Educational Institutions

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT OF SOUTH FLORIDA

  • Coconut Creek, FL
  • http://www.jasouthflorida.org

Mission Statement

The mission of Junior Achievement of South Florida is to inspire and prepare youth throughout Broward and south Palm Beach counties to succeed in a global economy.

Main Programs

  1. JA Fellows
  2. JA BizTown Camp
  3. JA Career Bound
  4. JA BizTown
  5. JA Finance Park
  6. JA In-Class Programs
Service Areas

Self-reported

Florida

Broward, Desoto, Glades, Hardee and Okeechobee Counties, cities of and surrounding unincorporated areas of Boca Raton and Delray Beach in Palm Beach County in southeastern Florida.

ruling year

1994

President/CEO since 2015

Self-reported

Ms. Laurie Sallarulo

Keywords

Self-reported

education, business, enterprise, leadership, soft skills

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Also Known As

JA of South Florida

EIN

59-0871446

 Number

1004032108

Physical Address

1130 Coconut Creek Blvd

Coconut Creek, FL 33066 1647

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Junior Achievement of South Florida just completed (June 30, 2016) the seventh year operating the largest outreach for capstone programs in the world. Since opening in the fall of 2009, over 260,000 students have studied and visited JA BizTown and JA Finance Park at JA World Huizenga Center at Broward College. In all, JASF has served almost 830,000 students since inception in 1959.

During the 2015-2016 school year, Junior Achievement of South Florida served 46,818 students with the help of 6,862 volunteers!

JA BizTown and JA Finance Park students showed a 43% and 34% increase in knowledge, respectively, last year.

“My child absolutely cannot say enough about his experience and I, as a parent, loved seeing how engaged the children of all demographics were. Some even dressed for their roles as CEOs. It is so inspiring and we're so grateful for what you're doing in our community" – JA BizTown Parent

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

JA Fellows

Innovation. Entrepreneurship. Passion. Invention. Work readiness. Financial literacy. These words illustrate JA Fellows: a student-led program to empower and develop tomorrow’s leaders.

Hear what one of last year's JA Fellows' students has to say: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAu_HKDg4OQ

JA is providing a solution to the workforce skills gap through a cutting-edge skills building program that empowers young people to find their entrepreneurial spirit and build upon their inner strengths.

JA Fellows is an in-depth, 18-session, highly intensive leadership and entrepreneurship program for high school students. Students gain real-world business experience by working in groups of 15-20, starting, capitalizing, and managing their own small businesses, while also developing communication and financial management skills. Mentors work in teams of 4-6, coaching students through the process of starting and running a small business. “Spark Tank” competitions are judged by local business celebrities. At yearend, companies participate in a local competition for scholarships and monetary awards. Some may even compete in a national competition in Washington, D.C.

Students are being recruited to form a goal of sixteen JA Fellows companies this year. That’s 320 local high school students creating their very own company! Each will be hosted at a different location including: Atlantic Technical, Calvary Christian Academy, McFatter Technical College, University School, Plantation High School, Stoneman Douglas High School, J.P. Taravella, and St. Andrew’s School.

Students will demonstrate the fundamental acumen needed in a successful business startup; create a personal action plan; and exhibit the necessary skills and proficiency with applicable tools needed to be competitive in today's global knowledge economy. JA Fellows will shape the leadership styles of these youth and build confidence in their abilities and opinions. They might not each grow up to build their own company, but each will have a solid foundation upon which to build their future.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

Program 2

JA BizTown Camp

JA BizTown Summer Camp helps each child build a foundation for making intelligent, lifelong, personal financial decisions through hands-on, realistic site-based experiences. Our goal is for each child to:
• Practice and receive feedback on the job application and job interview process.
• Practice opening, maintaining ledger for, and balancing a checking account.
• Increase his/her financial knowledge.
• Feel more confident in his/her ability to be successful.
• Feel more confident about making decisions that deal with money.
• Have fun!

Camp Schedule:
THROUGHOUT WEEK: A maximum of 100 campers is served each week, and we maintain a ratio of 5/6 campers per staff member. Campers have fun in a safe, educational setting, and practice problem solving for business challenges with the help of teachers and counselors. Campers win prizes through raffles/contests, and act out customer service skits. They also participate in hands-on science and art projects, and hear from engaging guest speakers.

MONDAY: Campers determine their career interest/skills and strengths, complete job applications, and interview for a position in a business during a Job Fair. The interview process is a great opportunity for the campers to learn how to use soft skills!

TUESDAY: Campers are introduced to their business purpose, products, and plans. For example, if they are in a retail location, they will discuss how many items they'll need to sell to their fellow campers to make their goal; or if they are a service business, how many customers they'll need to provide services too. They practice using a checking account, discuss charitable giving and create a presentation for the camp at large. They plan and create goods and services, and receive on-the-job training towards operating their business.

WEDNESDAY: Campers undergo additional training on how to run the business and manage the JA BizTown money they are paid for completing their assigned tasks.. They then follow their Business Planning Guide and Start Up Checklist to complete final tasks, including loan applications, paychecks, advertisements, product inventories and sales displays. Once all is finished, camp opens for business!!

THURSDAY: Campers balance their checkbook, deposit their paycheck, and shop in the businesses. As Business Entrepreneurs, campers create and sell goods and services, pay bills, make deposits and loan payments, use marketing and customer service techniques, and maybe even make a profit!

FRIDAY: Campers make and spend money while running their business one last time in hopes of paying off their business loan. Friday's Business Conference allows for time to evaluate and reflect. Then, as Philanthropists, campers run a Fund Raising Carnival!

https://jasouthflorida.org/programs/ja-biztown-summer-camp

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Program 3

JA Career Bound

JA Career Bound:
• Created to meet our community’s needs by bringing together JA’s tried and true curriculums, covering career success, entrepreneurism, business ethics, and career assembly, with the knowledge of our community’s leaders
• Provides hands-on experiences with problem solving, critical thinking, dependability, work ethic, and customer service
• Provides hands-on experiences completing job applications, job interviews, and public speaking
• Introduces kids to various industries and the people who work them
• Culminates with an internship opportunity to practice workforce skills and build confidence
• Brings kids together from various schools to work and learn together – to grow together

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

Program 4

JA BizTown

A BizTown is a fully interactive, true-to-life, simulated town experience where students learn the fundamental relationship between academics and life beyond school. Prior to visiting, the students engage in a comprehensive 16-hour in-school curriculum that leads them through the study of business principles, STEM career exploration, banking procedures, business decisions and economic terms. It also includes a job interview process. During their day at JA BizTown, the new employees go to work at one of the eighteen businesses, receive paychecks, spend money, and hopefully pay back their business loan by the end of the day.

JA BizTown offers a solid foundation to youth from which to grow. It provides them with opportunities to understand their responsibilities toward becoming the productive, effective, and ethical employees and employers the future is already demanding. It often is the first step to understanding the business world and their part in it, while increasing the potential completion of their education. While not every student can be the company CEO, every student becomes a member of each company's team with a shared goal to be successful (to pay back a business loan at the end of the day).

JA BizTown meets the needs of a diverse group of students by providing engaging, academically enriching, experiential lessons. It gives kids a chance to own, manage and grow their own business. JA BizTown students will:
• Understand a huge variety of occupations are available to them.
• Demonstrate a basic understanding of the free enterprise system.
• Build money management skills through a practical knowledge of economic concepts and
banking practices.
• Develop an understanding of basic business practices and responsibilities.
4
• Demonstrate the soft skills necessary for successful participation in the work-world.
• Discuss the roles they, as citizens, play in their community as workers and consumers and
relate these personal roles to the free enterprise system.
• Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of nonprofit organizations.
• Discuss the importance of citizen rights and responsibilities in a community.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Budget

Program 5

JA Finance Park

Before visiting JA Finance Park, the students engage in a comprehensive 16-hour curriculum, either at their school or at non-profit partners. Junior Achievement of South Florida provides training to all teachers prior to the curriculum being taught.

JA Finance Park students are challenged to manage a randomly assigned identity that includes marital status, number of children, annual income, education attained and job type. They prepare budgets and visit vendors to purchase housing, food, furniture, insurance, education, automobiles, and more. This true-to-life, interactive community offers the students a very strong understanding of the relevance between what they are taught in school and how it is used in life.

Income
Students recognize the fundamental role of income in managing their personal finances and the factors that affect income and take-home pay. They will understand the decisions they make about education and career will have an impact on their potential income and quality of life.



Three (Required) 45-minute Lessons
• Lesson One: Plan Your Future
Students will make the distinction between abilities, aptitudes, interests, work preferences, and values. They will explore various sources of income, including salaries and wages, interest, and business profit.
• Lesson Two: Careers
Students identify their career interests and goals as a way to earn future income. They set a career goal they will revisit at the end of the program.
• Lesson Three: Taxes and My Income
Students learn the three main sources of government’s tax on income and determine net monthly income by deducting federal income tax, Social Security, and Medicare deductions.

Saving, Investing, and Risk Management
Students explore savings and compare investments as a part of their overall financial planning. They also examine risk and how insurance may help protect savings.

Two (Required) 45-minute Lessons
• Lesson One: Saving and Investing
Students are introduced to various short and long term savings and investment options such as savings accounts, stocks, and mutual funds.
• Lesson Two: Managing Risk
Students recognize that insurance policies are a common way to minimize risk for accidents and unforeseen circumstances.

Debit and Credit
Students compare financial institutions and their services. Through discussion and a game activity they also weigh the advantages and disadvantages of debit and credit. Lastly, students examine the role of credit scores and credit reporting have on personal finances.

Three (Required) 45-minute Lessons
• Lesson One: Banking Partners
Students identify the types of financial institutions and the services they provide.
• Lesson Two: Personal Spending
Students become aware of the advantages and disadvantages related to debit and credit cards.
• Lesson Three: Savvy Shopping
Students participate in the Savvy Shopper game and see first-hand the costs and benefits of debit and credit.
• Lesson Four: Managing Credit
Students explore credit reports and credit scores and discover why they are important as well as how to build good credit.

Budget
Students discover the importance of spending money wisely and recognize a budget as a valuable tool. They create personal budgets based on savings and life-style goals and day-to-day situations.
Three (Required) 45-minute Lessons
• Lesson One: Think Before You Spend
Students define what good money management is and why it is important. They discuss how setting financial goals and being an informed consumer will help them better manage their money.
• Lesson Two: What is a Budget?
Students identify the components of a successful budget.
• Lesson Three: Who Uses a Budget?
Students practice budgeting and learn how this tool can help them responsibly manage their daily finances.

The Simulation and Debriefing
Students experience the JA Finance Park simulation, where they apply classroom learning by creating a family budget based on a hypothetical life situation. Students recognize the impact of credit history on budget planning and purchasing options.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

Program 6

JA In-Class Programs

Elementary School Program Overview
The Elementary School Programs include six sequential themes for kindergarten through fifth-grade students. Students learn the basic concepts of business and economics and how education is relevant to the workplace. The activities build on studies from each preceding grade and prepare students for secondary school and lifelong learning. Each program involves five lessons of approximately 30 - 45 minutes each.

- Ourselves® Kindergarten
- Our Families® First Grade
- Our Community® Second Grade
- Our City® Third Grade
- Our Region® Fourth Grade
- Our Nation® Fifth Grade

Middle School Program Overview
Each middle school program contains six lessons. Lessons are generally taught once a week for six weeks – 45 minutes to an hour for each lesson.
- JA Global Marketplace® is designed to provide practical information about the key aspects of the global economy, what makes world trade work, and how trade affects students' daily lives.

- JA Economics for Success® lays bare for students the heart of a successful economic life: choosing the right career and managing money properly.

- JA It's My Business® encourages students to use entrepreneurial thinking as they explore higher education and career choices. Students participate in fun, challenging activities such as an entrepreneurial quiz game, completing a blueprint for a teen club, participating in an auction of businesses, and creating entrepreneur profile cards.

- JA It's My Future!® offers practical information about preparing for the working world. Students explore potential careers, discover the four factors to consider in choosing a career, and recognize basic job-hunting tools.

High School Program Overview
The high school programs help students make informed, intelligent decisions about their future, and foster skills that will be highly useful in the business world. With a range of different programs, Junior Achievement teaches concepts regarding work readiness, financial literacy and entrepreneurship. Each high school program contains five to eight lessons. Lessons are generally taught once a week for six weeks - 45 minutes to an hour for each lesson.
- JA Personal Finance® focuses on earning money; spending money wisely through budgeting; saving/investing; using credit cautiously; and protecting one's personal finances.

- JA Job Shadow® offers students a unique opportunity: a visit to a professional work environment and insights into how to find and keep a fulfilling career.

- JA Finance Park Virtual has three components that tie it all together and make it engaging and relevant to students: 1) in-class curriculum, 2) mentors and 3) a virtual simulation activity in which the students budget for life based on a randomly assigned life scenario, based on our JA Finance Park® program below.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Number of volunteers

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

2. Number of clients served

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

3. Number of children who attended JA BizTown Summer Camp

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
JA BizTown Camp
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

4. Number of high schoolers who completed the JA Fellows (formerly JA Company) program

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
JA Fellows
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Junior Achievement of South Florida's goal is to provide every K-12 student with the financial, entrepreneurial, and work readiness knowledge and education they will need to be responsible citizens and contribute to our community.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Junior Achievement of South Florida continues to serve 100% of the Broward County public school 5th and 8th graders through JA BizTown and JA Finance Park. We strive to increase our high school and south Palm Beach County impact through new and strengthened partnerships.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    A strong Board of Directors, a strong support base in the community, and exceptional collaborations with local colleges and universities provide resources needed.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Junior Achievement of South Florida will know we are making progress on our new high school initiative if:
    Funds raised for the initiative exceed $1,000,000
    Number of high school students served exceeds 500
    Partnerships are engaged for the high school initiative to achieve sustainability
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    JASF has accomplished the following for the high school initiative:
    $250,000 committed
    Partnership has been established with one college and one university
    Board of Directors committee is focused on high school initiative development
    Programs offered starting fall 2014
    $750,000 still to be raised
Service Areas

Self-reported

Florida

Broward, Desoto, Glades, Hardee and Okeechobee Counties, cities of and surrounding unincorporated areas of Boca Raton and Delray Beach in Palm Beach County in southeastern Florida.

Social Media

Funding Needs

JA World Program Funding - the cost per student to provide the JA BizTown and JA Finance Park in-class curriculum and one-day simulation is $65 (not including in-kind). During 2015-16, through these two programs alone, 38,666 children were served at a cost of $2,513,290. Technology - JA World opened its doors in 2009 and JA BizTown and JA Finance Park both incorporate much technology. All of the televisions, computers, hardware and software are in need of upgrades at an estimated $250,000. Volunteers - Last year's 6,500+ volunteers represented over 350 local companies and organizations! Trained corporate and community volunteers deliver relevant, hands-on experiences that provide students knowledge and skills in financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship. The JA model gives school children exposure to adults who can bring their work experiences to the classroom and connect school lessons to the business world. All volunteers go through a background screening in accordance with school board policy. Each year volunteers must be recruited and recognized in order to continue a history of very engaged, qualified volunteers. Our volunteers rated their overall experience as 4.9 on a 5.0 scale, but they also provided anecdotal feedback that we have used to improve our sign-up process and training. We count on volunteers for honest feedback about their experiences so that we can continually improve our processes. Current value of volunteer time is $22.08 in Florida and the average time spent by our volunteers is 8 hours. Last year we utilized

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External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT OF SOUTH FLORIDA INC
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT OF SOUTH FLORIDA

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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President/CEO

Ms. Laurie Sallarulo

BIO

As Junior Achievement of South Florida expands programming and rolls out innovative technology, the non-profit organization named veteran executive and longtime children's advocate Laurie Sallarulo as president and CEO in May 2015.

With an extensive background in management, strategic and financial planning, fundraising, organizational development and program operations, Sallarulo significantly increased revenues and membership while heading the non-profit Leadership Broward Foundation, where she created successful initiatives including a women's leadership program. Previously, she managed PNC Bank's community relations and Foundation operation team for the southeast Florida region. Earlier in her career, she was CEO of the SHAPE youth leadership program and a key executive with 211 Broward and Habitat for Humanity of Broward.

As a dedicated advocate for children – especially those at risk or with special needs – she serves as the Governor-appointed chair of the Early Learning Coalition of Broward, and of the Florida Early Learning Advisory Council to the Governor. She has served two four-year terms as a Governor-appointed member of the Children's Services Council of Broward. She is also vice-chair of the Broward County Children's Services Board and a member of the Greater Fort Lauderdale Alliance Board.

“Laurie's track record for shaping change in South Florida's corporate and non-profit sectors -- and her tireless work to improve the lives of our community's children -- make her an ideal fit for our mission," said John Ray, chair of the Junior Achievement of South Florida Board of Directors. “She's built exceptionally strong, innovative partnerships for more than two decades to benefit our area's families, working closely with the region's business executives, non-profit leaders and elected officials."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ms. Amy Allen

Avison Young

Term: July 2016 - June 2017

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?