Animal related

Big Cat Rescue, Corp.

  • Tampa, FL
  • http://bigcatrescue.org

Mission Statement

Big Cat Rescue, one of the world's most impactful sanctuaries for exotic cats, is a leading advocate in ending the abuse of captive big cats and saving wild cats from extinction.
 
Care of our cats. The narrow mission of Big Cat Rescue is to provide the best permanent home we can for the abused, abandoned and retired cats in our care. We do this by building enclosures in a very natural habitat with foliage and shelter on our 67 acre site, by providing the best nutritional and medical care possible, and by having active operant conditioning and enrichment programs to provide for their physical and psychological well being.

Education. The broader mission of the sanctuary is to reduce the number of cats that suffer the fate of abandonment and/or abuse and to encourage preservation of habitat and wildlife. We urge people to behave in a way that will support these goals by teaching people about the plight of the cats, both in the wild and in captivity. We accomplish this through educational guided tours, educational programs for young people, and by maintaining a website that is the world's largest and best resource for information about exotic cats.

Main Programs

  1. Care of the Cats
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

Based in Tampa, FL USA but serving throughout the US and abroad.

ruling year

1996

Principal Officer

Self-reported

Mrs. Carole Baskin

President

Self-reported

Mrs. Jamie Veronica Boorstein

Keywords

Self-reported

tigers, lions, cheetahs, jaguars, leopards, big cats, exotic cats, education, conservation, wildcats

Notes from the Nonprofit

Big Cat Rescue is the most impactful accredited sanctuary in the world dedicated entirely to abused and abandoned big cats. We are home to approximately 80 lions, tigers, bobcats, cougars and other species most of whom have been abandoned, abused, orphaned, saved from being turned into fur coats, or retired from performing acts. Our dual mission is to provide the best home we can for the cats in our care and educate the public about the plight of these majestic animals, both in captivity and in the wild, to end abuse and avoid extinction.

The sanctuary began rescuing exotic cats in Nov. 4, 1992.

The non profit 501c3 sanctuary is home to more than about 80 exotic big cats

The cats at Big Cat Rescue are here for a variety of reasons, including:

Abandoned by owners who wrongly thought they would make good pets
Abused by owners in order to force them to perform
Retired from performing acts
Saved from being slaughtered to make fur coats
Rescued as babies after hunters killed their mothers. See our Bobcat Rehab and Release work.

Big Cat Rescue has many species of cats, who are threatened, endangered or extinct now in the wild, including:
Tigers, Lions, Leopards, Cougars, Bobcats, Lynx, Servals, Ocelots, and Caracals.

Big Cat Rescue's dual mission is to provide the best home we can for the cats in our care and educate the public about the plight of these majestic animals, both in captivity and in the wild, to end abuse and avoid extinction.

The non-profit organization is:

Accredited by the Global Federation of Sanctuaries
Certified by Independent Charities of America as a “Best in America Charity"
Member of the World Society for Protection of Animals
Rated 4 Stars by Charity Navigator (their highest rating) and has one of the highest scores of any animal based charity
The sanctuary is situated on 67 acres in the Citrus Park area of north Tampa.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014.
Register now

Also Known As

B.C.R.

EIN

59-3330495

 Number

1418660936

Physical Address

12802 Easy Street

Tampa, 33625 3702

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

Wildlife Sanctuary/Refuge (D34)

Education N.E.C. (B99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Big Cat Rescue meets all 6 standards of high impact charities.
1. Since 1998 Big Cat Rescue has been involved in changing laws to protect big cats, in addition to caring for hundreds of wild cats, that we have rescued from abuse and neglect. See what we are working on now at CatLaws.com
2. We have found many for profit partners to work with, including Styx, C1 Bank and The Body Shop.
3. We give an inside look at all of our work through guided tours, to our weekly videos, to our many daily posts to social sites, to our live webcams.
4. We share our knowledge and resources with other accredited sanctuaries so they don't have to reinvent the wheel. We have created more than 20 “sanctuary in a box" Intranet sites with all of the training and operation manuals, as well as animal care documentation programs, to expedite the best possible conditions for captive wildlife. We also share that w/ free codes to use ZooCollege.com
5. We are able to operate leanly by having all animal care done by volunteers so that more than 80% of donations go to program services. With 16 paid staff, each person is their own. Each staff member is free to do whatever works best for them to get the job done, within the culture of Big Cat Rescue which is based on transparency, integrity and respect for all life. We all meet weekly to discuss issues we are working on to utilize the skills of each other to our best potential.
6. We work with many larger animal protection groups on joint efforts to create a world where all will cats live free.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Care of the Cats

Our primary program is to care for our 100+ big cats.

Category

Animal-Related

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

$1,362,043.00

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Number of people influenced to undertake conservation action

Target Population
General/Unspecified

Connected to a Program?
Care of the Cats
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
37,692 people took action on our big cat alerts at CatLaws.com Our Facebook fans have become our primary advocates, which is harder to measure, but FB fans increased 936,795 in 2015.

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Our goal is to end a need for sanctuaries like ours. We plan to end the trade in exotic cats that causes a need for rescue facilities by educating people about why wild cats belong in the wild and not in cages and by encouraging them to take action to that end by asking for more restrictive laws and not patronizing places that breed wild cats for life in cages.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    We carry out this education through personal guided tours of the sanctuary, a virtual tour app for iPhone and Android and through outreach (that never takes wild animals along as props) and through our online website, social sites, a learning management system at ZooCollege.com and 9 live webcams at explore.org.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    We have the volunteer force necessary to give the daily educational tours and have a full time Director of Outreach who arranges for outreach programs. We have a two full time people dedicated to our videos when have received over 149 million views and to answering questions on our social sites. We have more than 2 million Facebook fans and interact with them daily on big cat issues. Our website gets 3.5 million unique visitors per year and has over 10,000 pages of educational content that explains why wild animals belong in the wild and not in our homes and back yard cages.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    We will know that we have achieved our goal when the phone quits ringing with people asking us to take their lions, tigers and other inappropriate pets. We know that the passage of the Big Cats and Public Safety Act will eliminate 98% of the breeding and discarding of big cats in this country. Once that bill becomes law there will be a need to shelter the cats who are displaced, but we will see the cats in private hands die out of old age over the next few years and the problem will be solved. We are fortunate to be advocating for a cause that can actually succeed through common sense legislation and better education.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    2003 - The Captive Wildlife Safety Act made it illegal to sell a big cat across state lines

    2003-2013 Nine more states have passed bans or partial bans on the private possession of big cats

    2012 The Big Cats and Public Safety Protection Act was introduces and gained 60 bi partisan co sponsors before the session ended

    2014 The Big Cats and Public Safety Protection Act was re introduced and and gained 120 bi partisan co sponsors by Dec 2014

    2015 Working with Mexico to build their first sanctuary for big cats displaced after the passage of a ban on the use of all wild animals in performances.

    2016 The federal bill now has 70+ cosponsors and is progressing toward a committee hearing. The USFWS rescinded the "generic tiger" loophole that allowed unregulated breeding of tigers, and USDA is now enforcing a ban on public contact with cubs under 4 weeks old. This has been due to our work as part of the Big Cat Coalition.

    Many countries have also passed bans in this time frame and many countries have passed bans on circus acts that use wild animals. Countless states, counties and cities have passed bans and partial bans and with these bans we are already seeing a huge drop in the number of displaced big cats each year. Dropping from 312 abandoned big cats in 2003 to around 10-15 a year now.
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

Based in Tampa, FL USA but serving throughout the US and abroad.

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

Our most recent rescues include 4 Tigers and a leopard who were seized by the government as illegal pets. Each big cat costs us $10,000 a year in food and vet costs. We are getting more calls for bobcats who need to be rehabbed for release back to the wild and are about to start raising money for a $250,000 capital campaign to handle the increased demand for services. Caring for the cats can be done via Sponsorships $25 to $5000. This is our form of “membership". Choose a particular cat to have your donation associated with and provide ongoing annual support for that cat at a level you choose.  Federal Employees Combined Federal Campaign.   Our thanks to the over 400 Federal Employees and Military Personnel who donated to the cats through the CFC in our second year as national members. Our CFC Number is 10766. Company Matching Donations - Please check with your employer to see if they have a matching program. This is a great way to double your impact at no cost to you.   http://bigcatrescue.org/donate

Affiliations + Memberships

Chamber of Commerce

Chamber of Commerce

Videos

photos




External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

BIG CAT RESCUE CORP
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

Sign in or create an account to view this information

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Big Cat Rescue, Corp.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Principal Officer

Mrs. Carole Baskin

President

Mrs. Jamie Veronica Boorstein

BIO

37 years experience with exotic cats and an entrepreneurial background enable the founder to be uniquely qualified for the mission at hand.

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

"30 years experience with exotic cats and an entrepreneurial background enable the founder to be uniquely qualified for the mission at hand."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Jamie V Murdock

Big Cat Rescue

Term: Jan 2008 - Dec 2016

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?