Environmental Quality Protection, Beautification

CONGRESS FOR THE NEW URBANISM

  • Chicago, IL
  • www.cnu.org

Mission Statement

The Congress for the New Urbanism is a movement in America aimed at re-establishing compact, walkable neighborhoods in well-planned cities and towns; revitalizing urban centers, reconfiguring sprawling suburbs; conserving regional environmental assets; and preserving our built legacy.

Main Programs

  1. Transportation Networks
  2. Emergency Response and Street Design
  3. Highways to Boulevards
  4. Urban Thoroughfares Manual

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1994

chief executive for fy 2004

John Norquist

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

new urbanism, urbanism

Self-reported by organization

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012.
Register now

EIN

65-0483737

Physical Address

140 S. Dearborn St Suite 404

Chicago, IL 60603

Also Known As

CNU

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Other Art, Culture, Humanities Organizations/Services N.E.C. (A99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Transportation Networks

CNU has long recognized transportation as a key determinant
of quality of urban form and community life. Transportation networks not
only accommodate a region's access and mobility needs but also helps determine
the location, type and form of land development. CNU seeks to create sustainable
transportation networks that are planned in coordination with community planning and work to reduce household
costs, traffic injuries and greenhouse gas emissions.

This CNU initiative aims to define and detail the characteristics
of urban transportation networks across all scales to
advance the creation of sustainable neighborhoods, cities, towns and regions.

Category

Public, Society Benefit

Budget

$17,000.00

Population Served

General Public/Unspecified

Program 2

Emergency Response and Street Design

In recent years, new urbanists and firefighters have discovered both
common interests and shared challenges in neighborhood street design.

The Emergency Response & Street Design Initiative, a
collaboration between the Congress for the New Urbanism, fire marshals
from across the United States, and the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency's Smart Growth program(http://www.epa.gov/livability/) , found solid common ground for ongoing efforts to reconcile narrower streets and good emergency access: Street
connectivity — specifically well-connected networks of traditional
street grids — is essential to good urbanism, shortens emergency
response times, and improves overall community life safety.

From that foundation, we are cooperatively working to change the International Fire Code with proposed amendments(http://www.cnu.org/node/2896)
empowering local fire code officials to be flexible on street designs.
Underlying this initiative are a few basic facts: Wider streets lead
to higher traffic speeds and greater chances for fatal collisions, as
shown by CNU member Peter Swift's study, Residential Street Typology and Injury Accident Frequency(http://www.newurbanengineering.com/) .
Depending on their context, they damage, if not destroy outright, any
sense of an inviting, walkable place. As communities sprawl outward and
homes are built further and further from firehouses, firefighters and
other emergency responders find it increasingly costly and difficult to
maintain acceptable emergency response times. Those times suffer, and
response distances increase when street networks are designed as poorly
connected mazes of cul-de-sacs.

To meet these challenges, new urbanists and firefighters are finding
that building compact neighborhoods with highly connected street
networks can provide a solution that keeps homes close to fire stations
and out of high-hazard areas.

Category

Public, Society Benefit

Budget

$6,000.00

Population Served

General Public/Unspecified

Program 3

Highways to Boulevards

America's twentieth century highway building era included elevated freeways
which cut huge swaths across our cities, decimating neighborhoods and
reducing quality of life for city residents. This massive concrete infrastructure
had devastating effects on urban economies. It blighted adjacent property
and pushed access to basic amenities further out. With the Federal and
State Departments of Transportation confronting shrinking budgets and
cities looking for ways to increase their revenues, it is an ideal time
to offer less expensive, urban alternatives to the reconstruction of urban
expressways.

New York City, Portland, San Francisco, Milwaukee and Seoul, South Korea
have confronted this problem by replacing elevated highways with boulevards,
saving billions of dollars and increasing real estate values on adjacent land. The Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU) believe that teardowns offer an attractive
option for cities struggling with aging highway infrastructure. The strategies
are proving themselves in adding value and restoring urban neighborhoods
decimated by highway construction.

Category

Public, Society Benefit

Budget

$100,000.00

Population Served

General Public/Unspecified

Program 4

Urban Thoroughfares Manual

Leading engineers, elected
officials, planners, and others are now using a new resource created by the
Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) and the Congress for the New Urbanism
(CNU) for local communities. Released in 2010, the recommended practice guide, Designing
Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, advances the
successful use of context-sensitive solutions (CSS) in the planning and design
of major urban thoroughfares for walkable communities. It provides guidance
and demonstrates how context-sensitive design principles and techniques may
be applied where community objectives support new urbanism and smart growth:
walkable, connected neighborhoods, mixed land uses, and easy access for pedestrians
and bicyclists. The manual is a partnership between the Institute of Transportation
Engineers (ITE) and CNU. Under contract to the Federal Highway Administration
(FHWA), the two organizations have created a context sensitive design guide
dedicated exclusively to major thoroughfares in cities and towns.
 
Since the manual's release, CNU and ITE have continued to collaborate on educational and outreach efforts across the country. The manual was used as a guide in 2010 when CNU was contracted out by the City of Elgin to assist in the development of a streets plan for the town.

Category

Public, Society Benefit

Budget

$19,000.00

Population Served

General Public/Unspecified

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

External Reviews

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits
Source: greatnonprofits.org

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

CONGRESS FOR THE NEW URBANISM
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Knowledge Base Search
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

CONGRESS FOR THE NEW URBANISM

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Knowledge Base Search
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

John Norquist

BIO

John Norquist's work promoting New Urbanism as an alternative to
sprawl and antidote to sprawl's social and environmental problems
draws on his experience as big-city mayor and prominent participant
in national discussions on urban design and school reform. John was
the Mayor of Milwaukee from 1988-2004. Under his leadership, Milwaukee
experienced a decline in poverty, saw a boom in new downtown housing,
and became a leading center of education and welfare reform. He has
overseen a revision of the city's zoning code and reoriented development
around walkable streets and public amenities such as the city's 3.1-mile
Riverwalk. He has drawn widespread recognition for championing the
removal of a .8 mile stretch of elevated freeway, clearing the way
for an anticipated $250 million in infill development in the heart
of Milwaukee. A leader in national discussions of urban design and
educational issues, Norquist is the author of The Wealth of Cities,
and has taught courses in urban policy and urban planning at the
University of Chicago, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of
Architecture and Urban Planning, and at Marquette University. Norquist
served in the Army Reserves from 1971 to 1977, earned his undergraduate
and master's degrees from the University of Wisconsin. He represented
Milwaukee's south and west sides in the Wisconsin Legislature. He
chaired the National League of Cities Task Force on Federal Policy
and Family Poverty and served on the Amtrak Reform Council.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ellen Dunham-Jones

Georgia Tech College of Architecture

Term: June 2012 - June 2014

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?