Educational Institutions

Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida, Inc

  • Fort Myers, FL
  • www.JASWFL.org

Mission Statement

We are the world's largest organization dedicated to inspiring and preparing young people to succeed in a global economy.

Service Areas

Self-reported

Florida

ruling year

1994

Principal Officer since 2011

Self-reported

Ms. Anne Frazier

Keywords

Self-reported

Entrepreneurship, Financial Literacy, Work Readiness

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EIN

65-0503084

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Through age-appropriate curricula, Junior Achievement programs begin at the elementary school level, teaching children how they can impact the world around them as individuals, workers and consumers. Junior Achievement programs continue through the middle and high school grades, preparing students for future economic and workforce issues they'll face.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida's core purpose is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy. In everything Junior Achievement does, from raising funds to recruiting volunteers and implementing programs, the organization remains focused on the goal to impact more young people in Southwest Florida. We teach them real world lessons and prepare students for future economic and workforce issues. Through our educational programs, we: Inspire our youth to achieve, Involve volunteers in meaningful activities, and Invest in the future of the children in our Southwest Florida community. Through Junior Achievement programs, young people are prepared for the real world as they gain an understanding of American's free enterprise system, basic economic principles, work readiness skills and aptitudes, local economy composition, and personal finance. Specifically, the intended outcome(s) of Junior Achievement is to help young people develop: * Economic knowledge and understanding through experiential, hands-on learning. * Positive attitudes toward work and their contributions to a diverse society. * The desire to stay in school and develop their abilities and skills. * Mentor relationships with caring adults throughout the community. * Business and education partnerships that create a bridge between the classroom and the workplace. * Awareness of local businesses, industries and career opportunities. All students, to include at-risk, have the ability to understand that hard work results in the rewards of self-sufficiency and stops the cycle of dependence on government and other outside support. This involves understanding what it takes to create a business, produce a product, meet payroll, work to meet customer needs and expectations, repay bank loans, and serve the public through tax-supported services. Studies show that learning takes place when students participate in hands-on experiences, when they are active participants, and when they are involved in decision-making with consequences. Junior Achievement provides that type of experience. Junior Achievement intends on the expansion of K-12 programs in Collier, Lee and Charlotte counties. Our overall intended outcome is to serve supplemental economic education to more students. We want every child, when graduating, to have been served with Junior Achievement programming at least once during their academic career.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Our newly developed strategic initiative called 5-8-GRADUATE allows us to focus our attention and resources on 5th grade, 8th grade, and high school students enrolled in the public schools of Lee, Collier, and Charlotte counties. Kindergarten through high-school programming is still being offered to private school and after-school curriculum. Maximizing our investments and resources is vital in supporting our impact on our local youth, economy, and educational system. 5-8-GRADUATE allows us to focus our JA programming around our three main pillars (financial literacy, entrepreneurship, and work readiness) at key transitional times in the lives of our students. This will help to fulfill our long term goal of making JA available to more schools while impacting more students. Our strategy to continue to rely on volunteers and businesses to support the program stays in place. Our volunteers (community leaders, business owners, and entrepreneurs) deliver the JA curriculum while sharing their own experiences with the students. This helps fulfill our goal of transforming the key concepts of our lessons into a message that inspires and empowers students to believe in themselves and make a difference within their community and the world. Through an innovative partnership between the business community, educators, and volunteers; JA will accomplish our goal of helping young people connect with relevant learning and the importance of staying in school. JA programming inspires students to develop competitive skills and confidence. Students' success bolsters the local workforce and contributes to the economic growth within Southwest Florida.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Junior Achievements business and finance lessons are unique. No other agency provides the classroom programs with the tri-county region that are accredited by the Florida Sunshine State Standards. As we are the world's largest organization dedicated to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy, we are prepared to accomplish our mission. We currently have over 430 local volunteers trained and ready to provide programming. For 2013-2014 we were able to serve over 12,000 students in over 550 classes. This reflects are capability to serve the area, but more importantly the demand. AS the demand of financial literacy standards increases in our state amongst the Florida Department of Education, we are able to fill this demand with our programming. As we operate on grants, donations, and fundraising dollars; we are capable of meeting the state standards at the district level with the supplemental financial lessons that have been removed from most curricula.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    JA gages program efficiency by administering student Pre/Post Tests showing the students level of knowledge prior to the JA Program and then after the JA program. It measures student knowledge received and allows them to gain the confidence they need in order to succeed. Additionally, students will: * further develop and enhance their reading, writing and math skills as these components are built into each individual JA program. The lessons taught through our programs correlate to national common core standards as well as the Sunshine State Standards (SSS). * experience an increase in critical thinking, decision making, team work and problem solving skills. * experience a more positive self-concept and higher self-esteem, and will take more personal responsibility for their behavior. Assessments of the long-term impact of students participation in JA showed that students participating during their middle and high school years had a better understanding of the free enterprise system, were more likely to be employed and were more likely to enroll in postsecondary education than were other same-age students. 79% of 9th grade students in the evaluation reported that JA positively affected their attitudes toward working, with the most common responses being: 1. 1. JA made me want to work / get a job 2. 2. JA increased my awareness about what job / career I want. JASWFL measures the results of our programs by the number of volunteers recruited, number of classes completed and documented, and the number of students served by racial and economic categories. Success is measured through volunteer and teacher evaluations at the end o the program. Results are also measured with pre and post tests for all JA students. This information isforwarded to JA USA for further evaluation and program development. Junior Achievement must meet state mandated standards and expectations for student learning. Our office keeps detailed records of all documents concerning the students served in the three county region. Our benchmarks, under our 5-8-GRADUATE initiative, is to increase the rate of: 37% of 5th grade students understanding what skills are in demand by employers, 36% of 8th grade students understanding the advantages / disadvantages of credit, and 65% of our high-school students to understand investment choices and personal finance
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    For the end of 2013-2014 school year, we served over 112 school sites with JA programming. We would like to increase this number by 10 percent every school year moving forward. Increasing by ten percent would allow us to eventually touch every elementary school , middle school, and high school within the tri-county area. As funding is vital in implementing program,we strive to: create more awareness, community outreach and involvement, increase volunteer base, and increase the number of students being served. We are accomplishing our mission of preparing young people to own their economic success, but we want to serve more students. As our mission does not change, we strive to collaborate with other agencies in order to fulfill the mission of preparing young people to succeed in a global economy. We have not been in every 5th grade class, 8th grade class, and high school class. That is what we strive for, for every student enrolled in the tri-county area to say "I had Junior Achievement as part of my academic career".
Service Areas

Self-reported

Florida

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA INC
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida, Inc

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone and website
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Ms. Anne Frazier

BIO

Previously, Anne Frazier served as the Executive Director of Drug Free Collier. Prior to moving to Naples in June, 2010, she was the Executive Director/Chief Professional Officer of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Blue Ridge in Martinsville, VA. Anne has been working in the nonprofit sector since 1999. She holds two degrees from Virginia Tech and continued her professional development by completing the ""Certificate in Non Profit Management"" Course from Duke University. Additionally, she is a graduate of Boys & Girls Clubs of America's Advanced Leadership Program. Modeled on the theory of social capital, she is a 2009 graduate of the prestigious LEAD VIRGINIA program that educates proven leaders about regional differences, opportunities and challenges across the Commonwealth of Virginia. She is a graduate of the Leadership Collier Foundation's ""Best Classes"" - the 2011 Class of the Growing Associate's in Naples (GAIN) program and the 2012 Class of Leadership Collier. She currently serves on the board of the Leadership Collier Foundation and on the Leadership Collier Alumni Leadership Lunch Speaker Series committee. She also serves on the executive committee for Special Olympics of Collier County, is a on the board of the Greater Naples Area Planned Giving Council and serves on the Advisory Board for the Gulfshore Business Magazine. Her proven ability to manage effectively, build social capital and be outcomes focused awarded her the honor of being named one of Virginia's Influential Women of 2010 by Virginia Lawyer's Media. She was honored by Gulfshore Business Magazine as one of their ""40 Under 40"" in September, 2012 and by the Business Observer, the weekly newspaper for business leaders on the Gulf Coast of Florida from Tampa Bay south to Naples, as one of their top ""40 Under 40"" in October, 2013. Recently she was recognized as a ""Rising Star"" under the Southwest Florida Power Players in the April 2014 issue of Gulfshore Business Magazine.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Tom Pitser

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?