Mental Health, Crisis Intervention

CENTER FOR CHILD COUNSELING INC

  • Palm Beach Gardens, FL
  • www.centerforchildcounseling.org

Mission Statement

The Center for Child Counseling is building the foundation for playful, healthful, and hopeful living for children and families in Palm Beach County.

Our programs and expertise are grounded in research about early brain development and the impact of adversity and trauma on development. Violence, abuse, and neglect in the earliest years of life are forms of “toxic stress" that can fundamentally change the developing brain. Secure, stable, supportive relationships between children and caring adults in the family and community contribute significantly to children's healthy brain development by buffering the brain from the damage due to high stress while simultaneously creating environments that promote healthy social-emotional, cognitive, and health outcomes.

Efforts made at the earliest developmental stages yields the greatest likelihood for later returns on investment and achievement of strong, positive child outcomes. Early intervention is critical because:
• By 8 months of age, brain synapses have increased from 50 to 1000 trillion.
• A child's early experiences actually build the architecture of the brain.
• Young children who are not touched have brains that are 20-30% smaller.
• Adversity in early childhood can lead to lifelong physical and mental health problems.
• Supportive, loving caregivers can actually buffer the effects of toxic environmental stress.

Main Programs

  1. Childcare and Community Social-Emotional Wellness (CCSEW) Program
  2. Fighting ACEs -Community Capacity Building
  3. Institute for Clinical Training
  4. Child and Family Center
  5. Child First
Service Areas

Self-reported

Florida

Palm Beach County , Florida

ruling year

1999

Chief Executive Officer

Self-reported

Ms. Renée Layman

Keywords

Self-reported

early childhood, mental health, child counseling, training for professionals, volunteers and internship program, infant mental health, play therapy, family therapy, childcare centers, trauma

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EIN

65-0932032

 Number

8330045596

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (O01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The Center for Child Counseling's programs lead to long-term change for young children in our community by reducing the incidence and prevalence of social-emotional, behavioral, and learning difficulties; strengthening the well-being of vulnerable children and their caregivers; and promoting positive parent-child relationships.

As children cope with trauma, grief, and attachment issues, they are better able to learn and interact in a healthy way with peers, adults, and family members. This in turn leads to better performance in school and success throughout adulthood. Our programs help caregivers heal emotional wounds (from trauma to depression) in order to better serve the children as healthy caregivers with new skills as therapeutic agents. These adults become more personally successful, more nurturing with their families, and more productive members of the community. Both children and adults are better able to reach their potential. These changes positively affect the center and community environments. The natural helpers aid in sustaining these changes, remaining after Center services are decreased to continue their teaching and ongoing supportive activities.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Childcare and Community Social-Emotional Wellness (CCSEW) Program

Developed in 2004, the Childcare and Community Social-Emotional Wellness (CCSEW) Program provides multilayered prevention, early intervention, and targeted treatment (including classroom observation, onsite mental health consultation and workshops, Individual and Group Play Therapy, Filial Therapy, and parenting groups) for young children and caregivers in shelters, the community, and childcare centers in high-risk neighborhoods.

Category

Mental Health, Substance Abuse

Population(s) Served

Infants/Babies (under age 5)

Adults

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Budget

326,452

Program 2

Fighting ACEs -Community Capacity Building

"Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are the single greatest unaddressed public health threat facing our nation today." Dr. Robert Block, former President, American Academy of Pediatrics.

Mental, emotional, social, and physical well-being are directly linked to what happens in early childhood, with studies confirming that some of the worst health and social problems throughout the lifespan arise as a consequence of early abuse, neglect, and exposure to traumatic stressors.
Fighting ACEs, our approach that targets young children living in high-risk communities, provides multilayered interventions and support for families and caregivers. The model includes building the capacity of adult caregivers and professionals to effectively buffer the effects of toxic stress in young children, healing the intergenerational cycle of abuse and trauma, and building healthy parent-child relationships through an array of prevention and early intervention services.

In conjunction with our Childcare and Community Social-Emotional Wellness (CCSEW) Program, we are working on building the capacity of our community to address this issue.

Category

Community Development

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Infants/Babies (under age 5)

Budget

5,000

Program 3

Institute for Clinical Training

Recognizing a critical need for training of mental health professionals working with young children, the Play Therapy Academy was developed in 2006 to provide training in early childhood therapy, trauma, and other topics related to early childhood mental health. The Academy was expanded in 2012, through a grant from the Quantum Foundation, to provide a 78-hour Comprehensive training (including didactic and experiential opportunities) in Play Therapy for professionals.

Now known as the Institute for Clinical Training, the program offers extensive training on Social-Emotional Wellness for Young Children, Infant Mental Health, Play Therapy, Impact of Trauma on Brain Development, and a variety of workshops for at-risk populations and other related topics for mental health, early childhood, school, legal, and pediatric professionals.

In 2015, weLEARNplay launched, creating an online learning experience for busy professionals interested in expanding their knowledge in the area of Play Therapy and Early Childhood Mental Health.

Through the Institute for Clinical Training, the Center for Child Counseling is a practicum provider for 16-18 Master's level interns each year.  Professionals and  interns receive both didactic and  hands-on training of skills creating a cadre of professionals able to effectively provide assessments and interventions for very young at-risk children.  They work with skilled therapists in shelters and childcare centers treating at-risk children thus providing critical services while educating the professionals.  Pre and post measures at workshops, supervisor evaluation and self evaluation using videotaped therapy sessions track progress.  The Center for Child Counseling provides Play Therapy and State of Florida continuing education credits.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Adults

None

Budget

20,000

Program 4

Child and Family Center

The Child and Family Center provides prevention, early intervention, and mental health counseling in a warm and supportive environment, helping young children and their caregivers develop resilience, positive relationships, and work through issues related to physical and sexual abuse, violence, grief, and traumatic experiences that impact mental health.

Our senior therapists are all licensed professionals who are Registered Play Therapists, Infant Mental Health Specialists, and Collaborative Problem Solving Clinicians with extensive training and education  They work with parents and children to assess potential problems and explore solutions in order to create healthy, happy relationships.

Our Child and Family Center offices are located in Palm Beach Gardens, with additional space at 5205 Greenwood Ave, West Palm Beach, FL 33407 in the Palm Healthcare Foundation Pavilion on the St. Mary's Medical Center campus.

Category

Mental Health, Substance Abuse

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Crime/Abuse Victims

Mentally/Emotionally Disabled

Budget

500,000

Program 5

Child First

Child First is a national, evidence-based, two-generation model that works with very vulnerable young children and their families, providing intensive, home-based services. Implementation in Palm Beach County is being supported by the Children's Services Council of Palm Beach County.

When young children grow up in environments where there is violence, neglect, mental illness, or substance abuse, the stress can be toxic to their developing brains. With effective intervention, this damage can be prevented.

Research demonstrates that these adverse experiences damage the developing brain of the young child. Therefore, Child First works in the home with a two-pronged approach: (1) Care coordination that provides wrap-around services and supports for the whole family, decreasing “toxic” stress, and (2) Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), an attachment-based, trauma-informed, dyadic intervention which protects the brain from the impact of stress and trauma. In this way, Child First is able to decrease the incidence of serious emotional disturbance, developmental and learning problems, and abuse and neglect among young children (prenatal to age six years). This intervention has been designated by Health and Human Services (HHS) as one of the 17 national, evidence-based home visiting models under the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Initiative (MIECHV).

Category

Mental Health, Substance Abuse

Population(s) Served

Infants/Babies (under age 5)

Adults

Budget

885,000

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Number of youth and families for whom a strengths-based assessment is completed

Target Population
Infants to preschool (under age 5), Children and youth (0-19 years)

Connected to a Program?
Child and Family Center
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

2. Number of training workshops

Target Population
Children and youth (0-19 years), Caregivers, Students

Connected to a Program?
Institute for Clinical Training
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

3. Number of clients served

Target Population
Children and youth (0-19 years), Caregivers, At-risk youth

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Overarching Goal: Enable at-risk children and their caregivers to become productive, caring, and resilient members of our community through quality services and training of mental health professionals

    Agency Objectives:
    Provide Individual, Group, and Family counseling for at-risk children and their families and caregivers using best practice interventions;
    Provide Psychoeducational workshops for parents, medical professionals, teachers, childcare workers, and other caregivers that promote social-emotional health and wellness;
    Provide continuing education workshops for mental health professionals that promote the enhancement of skills and use of effective therapeutic techniques with children, adolescents, and their families to enhance the system of care;
    Provide In-home, childcare center and school-based services that promote healthy relationships in the child's natural environment using best practice interventions by well-trained staff;
    Utilize outpatient-based individual, family assessments, and therapy using effective interventions, including Play Therapy, Filial Therapy, Trauma-Focused Play Therapy, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Positive Parenting Program (Triple P©), Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) by well-trained clinicians; and
    Provide a Clinical Internship program that focuses on developing therapists that are able to effectively work with children, ages 0-18, and their families.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Utilize the media, social media, and public relations to continually highlight programs, community need and issues.
    Enlist key business and community leaders to become champions of the cause to continue to build a base of support in the community for issues related to at-risk young children.
    Collaborate and partner with other community organizations to creatively utilize resources.
    Streamline and closely manage funder mix, budget-to-actual, and financial reports to optimize revenue mix and agency sustainability.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Since being founded, the Center for Child Counseling has focused on meeting the social-emotional needs of at-risk infants, toddlers, young children, and their families. As a result of our expertise and passion in the area of early childhood, we have earned the following experience, awards, and recognition over the past fifteen years:
    * Childcare and Community Social-Emotional Wellness Program: Developed in 2004, CCSEW provides multilayered prevention, early intervention, and targeted treatment (including classroom observation, onsite mental health consultation and workshops, Individual and Group Play Therapy, Filial Therapy, and parenting groups) for children attending childcare centers in high-risk neighborhoods.
    * Florida Blue Foundation Sapphire Award 1st Place Winner: Recognizing Community Health Excellence, we earned this prestigious award for excellence in service for babies and young children in 2008.
    * Easter Seals Service Excellence Award: For achievement in providing exceptional services to strengthen and enhance services for people with disabilities in 2005.
    * Institute for Clinical Training: The Institute provides an array of educational experiences for pediatric and mental health professionals, with a unique combination of classroom instruction and live supervision in high-risk childcare centers.
    * Chapter in “Play Therapy for the Very Young Child" Published: Staff co-wrote a chapter about the Childcare and Community Social-* Emotional Wellness Program.Published Teacher/Parent Manual: “A Way of Being with Children: Managing Feelings and Behavior" is a guide for parents and teachers.
    * 2013 and 2014 Extraordinary Charity in Palm Beach County.
    * Top-rated nonprofit by by GreatNonprofits 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015.
    * Town of Palm Beach United Way partner agency.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Professionals
    Impact: There will be a large cadre of Mental Health Professionals providing appropriate assessment and intervention services for thousands of at-risk young children and their caregivers over the course of their careers and teaching this knowledge and skills to others.

    Outcome: Professionals will be able to properly assess and diagnosis young children, have increased knowledge of early childhood social and emotional wellness, and be more able to effectively use play therapy skills and child-parent therapy skills to treat at-risk young children and their caregivers.

    Children
    Impact: Children will attain social-emotional wellness allowing them to reach their potential in school and society.

    Outcome: Children will be more resilient (measured by attachment, initiative and self-control) and have improved behavior, as measured by the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (DECA).

    Families

    Impact: Children and adult caregivers will attain social and emotional wellness, to facilitate increased family cohesiveness and productivity.

    Outcome: Parents will report a significant decrease in symptoms. Counselors' family sessions notes will show an increase in parents' ability to be responsive to the children's needs, set positive limits, use encouragement, choices and natural consequences and develop a positive relationship. Healthy well functioning parents will be more able to reach their potential as parents, in the workplace or school, and as community members. Parents will have improved nurturing relationships with their children, and families will increase their cohesiveness.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Over the past two years, the Center for Child Counseling has trained hundreds of mental health professionals and interns through Early Childhood Mental Health Training workshop s, providing over 200 hours of didactic training and more than 2,000 hours of supervised clinical experience. In the past year alone, we have provided workshops to over 550 professionals (mental health, legal, law enforcement, and medical) on a variety of topics, including the Impact of Trauma in Early Childhood. Through our training program, we have made a significant impact on the system of care for young children in Palm Beach County by influencing an entire network of professionals from agencies throughout the community.

    The best “side-effect" of the Early Childhood Mental Health training program has been the early mental health interventions provided for the hundreds of high-risk toddlers and young children. As part of their training, interns and trainees work with licensed therapists to provide thousands of hours of therapy to over 400 children in childcare centers and the community.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Florida

Palm Beach County , Florida

Additional Documents

Social Media

Funding Needs

Every month, roughly 50 children in Palm Beach County under the age of six are removed from their homes due to abuse or neglect. Over the past four months, referrals to our Child and Family Center, which provides a safe place for children to heal, have more than tripled to meet this need. We are dedicated to providing the best possible care for young children who have endured experiences no child every should. The need for financial support for Trauma Counseling is ongoing as we continue to increase our capacity to meet this need in our community. Our prevention and early intervention efforts for children living in shelters or attending high-risk childcare centers is at the core of our mission. We are dedicated to helping young children and their caregivers develop social-emotional health and resilience, which makes not only families but our community happier and healthier. We need individuals to invest in our children and families today. Invest and join our Fighting ACEs (Adverse Childhood Experiences) initiative today! In addition, general funding is needed to support quality mental health counseling for children and families who have experienced traumatic circumstances such as physical and sexual abuse, domestic violence, and neglect. The funding needs, as outlined, will fill critical gaps in meeting the needs of the most vulnerable children and families in Palm Beach County.

Videos

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External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

CENTER FOR CHILD COUNSELING, INC
Fiscal year: Jun 01-May 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

CENTER FOR CHILD COUNSELING INC

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Renée Layman

BIO

Renée E. Layman, MS, LMHC is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor with over twenty years of experience in mental health, sixteen specific to children's mental health, social emotional issues, and parenting. Over the past ten years, she has gained significant experience in the areas of program development, leadership, and non-profit management. In her various roles, Renée is a passionate advocate for child and family health, bringing high quality services for some of the most pressing issues facing at-risk children and families in Palm Beach County.

In addition to her experience in the nonprofit sector, Renée has successfully worked with children and families in private practice, specializing in childhood trauma, loss, and developmental difficulties utilizing Play and Equine Assisted Therapies. She has training in Filial Therapy, EMDR, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Child-Parent Psychotherapy, and is an accredited provider of the Triple P Parenting Program.

In recognition of her work in the area of child and family wellness, Renée received Delta Sigma Theta Sorority's Women of Excellence: Health & Wellness Award in 2011. She is currently the Co-Chair of the Palm Beach County Chapter of the Florida Association for Infant Mental Health, serves on the School District of Palm Beach County's ESE and SHAC Mental Health Advisory Committees, and is a board member of the Nonprofit Chamber of Palm Beach County. She is a graduate of Leadership Palm Beach County's Class of 2010 and continues to be an active member of the organization, currently serving as the Co-Chair for the Engage Program. Renée earned a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Florida Atlantic University and a Master's Degree in Mental Health Counseling from Nova Southeastern University. She lives with her family in Palm Beach Gardens.

PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE:
2000 - Licensed Mental Health Counselor – Florida – MH6542


STATEMENT FROM THE Chief Executive Officer

"At the Center for Child Counseling, we are dedicated to providing early intervention and treatment for young children impacted by trauma, violence, and abuse through quality counseling at local childcare centers in at-risk neighborhoods, shelters, schools, and our Child & Family Center in Palm Beach Gardens and West Palm Beach.

The foundation of our mission is Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health - providing support to the youngest, most vulnerable children in Palm Beach County. Our programs and expertise are grounded in research about early brain development and the impact of trauma and toxic stress. By helping to heal emotional trauma early in life, we are helping to pave the way for young children and their caregivers to fulfill their potential as productive and resilient members of our community.

Since 1999, we have provided therapy to thousands of at-risk children and families, with significantly positive outcomes. In the past year, we served over 1,200 children in high-risk neighborhoods, childcare centers, and shelters for victims of domestic violence. Through seed funding from the Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea, we developed groups for women and children at Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse (AVDA), which now continue through funding from the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence (FCADV). A core part of our strategy is place-based services - co-locating at other agencies to enhance access. We are pleased to partner with agencies such as Florence Fuller Child Development Centers and The Lord's Place to provide on-site services for some of the most vulnerable members of our community. With Boys Town, Families First, NAMI, and FAU Community Health, we are implementing the Children's Behavioral Health Collaborative, funded by Palm Beach County and Quantum Foundation. This model is helping the change the system of care for children's mental health in Palm Beach County.

Through continued support from the Quantum Foundation, private family foundations, and philanthropy our Childcare and Community Social-Emotional Wellness (CCSEW) Program provides an array of critical services for children and their caregivers. This year, we are pleased to launch an initiative that we call #FightingACEs (Adverse Childhood Experiences) and look forward to working with our community partners to build the capacity in Palm Beach County to address the needs of babies and young children who face the biggest hurdles to becoming successful adults. With visionary leadership, the Children's Services Council of PBC has brought Child First to our community, which we are implementing with support from Darcy Lowell, MD and her team in Connecticut.

These programs and initiatives will not only improve children's lives but also make our community better. We ask you to contact us, get involved, and learn more about how you help us continue our mission of supporting the youngest, most vulnerable children and families in Palm Beach County."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Bill Lynch

GEI Consultant, Inc

Term: June 2013 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Race & Ethnicity
Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
Yes
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
Yes
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
Yes
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
Yes
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan