Animal related

Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals, Inc.

  • New York, NY
  • www.AnimalAllianceNYC.org

Mission Statement

Organizational Overview

The Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals, a 501(c)(3) non-profit charity, is the sole umbrella organization for animal welfare in NYC. Since 2003, we have been working with our coalition of 150+ rescue groups and shelters to find homes for thousands of New York City's dogs and cats. Our goal is to transform New York City into a more humane community, where no dogs or cats of reasonable health or temperament are killed simply because they do not have homes.

While we work collaboratively with the City of New York, we are a 501(c)(3) charity and do not receive any government funding, nor are we a city agency.

Our Mission

The Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals is committed to seeing the day when no New York City dog or cat of reasonable health and temperament is killed merely because he or she does not have a home.

Main Programs

  1. Wheels of Hope for NYC's Homeless Pets
  2. Picasso Veterinary Fund
  3. New York City Feral Cat Initiative
  4. Helping Pets and People in Crisis

service areas

New York

Self-reported by organization

Areas Served Narrative

Primarily serving the five boroughs of NYC, with ties to the NY Metro area and beyond. Creating a community-based model being replicated in other areas of the country.

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

2002

Principal Officer since 2002

Jane Hoffman

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

Cats, dogs, animals, pets, New York City, adoption, spay, neuter, microchip, TNR, euthanasia, no kill, Hurricane, wheels of hope

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

73-1653635

Physical Address

244 Fifth Avenue Suite R290

New York, 10001 7604

Also Known As

the Alliance

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (D01)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (D12)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

The impact of the Mayor's Alliance,
working with the 150+ rescue groups and shelters participating in the Alliance,
includes: Lives Saved:  Three out of every four animals taken in by our city shelters is
now saved.  When the Alliance was formed in 2003, less than one in three was
saved.  Lives saved since the Alliance was formed (2003-2012)
total more than 237,000 animals. Euthanasia Decreased:
 2012 projected euthanasia is 76% less than during our baseline year of
2003. In 2012, euthanasia fell to below 8,000 dogs and
cats as compared to more than 10,000 in 2011 (and 31,700 when we started in 2003).

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Wheels of Hope for NYC's Homeless Pets

Each year, Wheels of
Hope for NYC's Homeless Pets, the Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals transport van program, picks up thousands of animals from Animal Care & Control of NYC (AC&C) shelters and transports them to non-profit shelters and rescue groups that participate in the Mayor's Alliance and have the resources to find new homes for them.   
Our transport program
allows AC&C to move animals out of the cages at their shelters more quickly — reducing both the numbers of cats and dogs euthanized for lack of space and
the chance that these pets contract upper respiratory infection and kennel
cough. (This is important to lessen both the suffering of the animals and the
vet bills of the non-profit rescue groups that care for them as they wait for a
new home.)

A major function of
our transport program is to supplement the resources of the Mayor’s Alliance
groups and shelters — allowing them to focus on what they do best: 
finding caring, permanent homes for pets. Transport costs, including the
vehicle (often operating seven days a week), insurance, gas, and the salaries of
our dedicated drivers, are paid for by the Mayor’s Alliance.

Category

Animal-Related

Budget

Population Served

Other Named Groups

Program 2

Picasso Veterinary Fund

The Picasso Veterinary Fund provides financial
assistance to help pay for medical care for homeless animals
taken in by Animal Care & Control of NYC (AC&C), who are then transferred for adoption to groups and
shelters participating in the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC's Animals.
Many of the animals
benefiting from medical care paid for by the Fund are brought to our attention
by the AC&C staff, the people who get to know and often fall in
love with these dogs and cats while they are at the city shelter. Pets selected for this help face a
variety of medical conditions, but otherwise are adoptable.

In addition to providing life-saving care, the
Picasso Veterinary Fund serves a second key role in helping to achieve the goal
of the Mayor’s Alliance: the day
when no New York City dog or cat of reasonable health and temperament is killed
merely because he or she does not have a home.  

All of the groups participating in the Mayor’s
Alliance are non-profit rescue groups and shelters, and many cannot afford to
pay significant vet bills. By
assisting with these costs, the Picasso Veterinary Fund helps these rescue groups
and shelters focus on their core
mission: finding caring, permanent homes for pets.

As an umbrella organization, the Alliance also has
had the ability to negotiate discounted fees with the veterinarians we work
with, allowing contributions to the Fund to help more pets get the vet care
they need and start a new life.

Category

Animal-Related

Budget

Population Served

Other Named Groups

Program 3

New York City Feral Cat Initiative

The New York City Feral Cat Initiative is a joint program of the Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals and Neighborhood Cats, two private non-profit organizations. Our mission is to solve the feral cat overpopulation crisis in New York City through the humane, non-lethal method of Trap-Neuter-Return, or TNR for short.

The Problem: Too Many Cats Living on the Streets

Tens of thousands of street cats live in the alleyways, backyards, and outdoor spaces of New York City. They are the offspring of lost or abandoned pet cats and, unneutered, they go on to spawn new generations. The cats group themselves together in packs called colonies. Many of their nuisance behaviors can be attributed to mating behaviors that would likely cease if they were sterilized. These behaviors include noise from fighting and mating, and the smell from the spraying of pheromone-laced urine.

Because these cats are not socialized to humans, they are not candidates for adoption. The breeding of these street cats results in more kittens entering the shelters — taking away homes that would otherwise go to the adult cats already there. Most adult feral cats taken in at city shelters are euthanized (killed) because they are not adoptable as house pets. As a result, the city must shoulder higher costs for municipal animal control.

The Solution: Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR)

Our New York City Feral Cat Database shows that in neighborhoods throughout New York City, TNR is proving effective in humanely managing feral cat colonies and reducing their numbers over time. TNR is a two-step approach to feral cat overpopulation:

Step One: TNR

Stray and feral (wild) cats are humanely trapped, evaluated, given a rabies vaccination, left eartipped, and spayed or neutered (sterilized) by a veterinarian, and then returned to the familiar habitat of their original colony. Tame (friendly) cats and kittens young enough to be socialized are removed for adoption placement in permanent indoor homes.

Step Two: Ongoing Feral Cat Colony Management

Volunteers called colony caretakers provide ongoing care of the cats, including daily food, water, and clean-up of the area, shelter, and monitoring of the cats' health. This ongoing surveillance ensures that any new cats that find their way into the colony will be removed if they are tame, or TNRed (rabies vaccinated, left eartipped, and sterilized) if they are feral. This allows the number of cats in the colony to diminish over time through natural attrition, as cats get old and die from natural causes.

Category

Animal-Related

Budget

Population Served

Other Named Groups

Program 4

Helping Pets and People in Crisis

A pilot program of the Mayor's Alliance, Helping Pets and People in Crisis relies on volunteers who care for pets in their homes while the pet's family is experiencing difficult times (including domestic violence, eviction, or illness).

Category

Animal-Related

Budget

Population Served

General Public/Unspecified

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Self-reported by organization

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals is the sole umbrella organization for animal welfare in NYC. Since 2003, we have been working with our coalition of 150+ rescue groups and shelters to find homes for thousands of New York City's dogs and cats. Our goal is to transform New York City into a no-kill community, where no dogs or cats of reasonable health or temperament are killed simply because they do not have homes. While we work collaboratively with the City of New York, we are a 501(c)(3) charity and do not receive any government funding, nor are we a city agency.

    As we embark upon our second decade of saving lives in New York City, we continue to rely upon the essential collaboration of our dedicated rescue groups and shelters; crucial funding support from the ASPCA, Maddie's® Fund, and other generous grantors and individual donors; and the generosity and caring of the thousands of New Yorkers who adopt from shelters or rescue groups. Together, we are transforming New York City into a community where homeless animals will have the promise of a safe and loving home.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    The Alliance implements programs that address critical animal welfare needs in NYC. The nature of these initiatives includes supporting partner rescue groups and shelters by coordinating mega-adoption events, providing crucial transportation services, and promoting spay/neuter and the practice of Trap-Neuter-Return for feral and community cats. Below is a description of our three most critical initiatives as we move forward into our second decade of saving lives.

    The Alliance’s Wheels of Hope transport program is the only free animal transportation program in NYC (where most people rely on public transportation), and the only program with the ability to transport dozens of animals at once. Providing this transportation service to no-kill shelters and rescue groups means these organizations can save more animals and focus their resources on finding homes. This program also allows NYC’s city shelter Animal Care & Control (AC&C) to move animals out of their facilities at a faster pace, creating space for arriving animals and reducing the chances for illness, which lessens animal suffering and reduces medical costs.

    The Alliance’s New York City Feral Cat Initiative (NYCFCI) is committed to solving the city’s feral cat overpopulation crisis through the humane, non-lethal method of Trap-Neuter-Return, or TNR for short. Tens of thousands of street cats live in NYC, and because these cats are not socialized to humans, they are not candidates for adoption. Many of their nuisance behaviors can be attributed to mating and the breeding of these street cats results in more kittens entering the shelters — taking homes that would otherwise go to adult cats already there. Most adult feral cats taken in at city shelters are euthanized because they are not adoptable as house pets. The NYCFCI provides advice to the general public and support to TNR caretakers by phone and e-mail; feline educational information via its website, e-mail list, and printed materials; community outreach and education, including training workshops in bottle-feeding and taming feral kittens; free equipment loans; transport of traps to and from TNR sites and transport of cats to and from spay/neuter appointments; and limited funding for TNR projects through specialized grants.

    The Alliance sponsors or co-sponsors several annual mega-adoption events, all with the common mission of eliminating the euthanasia of healthy and treatable dogs and cats in the city's shelters by promoting adoption. Many of the Alliance’s 150+ partner rescue groups do not have access to a physical location where they can show animals available for adoption and instead rely on a network of foster homes. These rescue groups rely on the mega-adoption events to move their animals into adoptive homes, and make space for new dogs and cats from the city shelters. These public events provide pet adoption, low-cost spay/neuter, low-cost microchipping, and/or other services, and promote responsible pet ownership.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Having operated as the sole umbrella organization for animal welfare in NYC since 2003, the Alliance is uniquely positioned to effectively coordinate between stakeholders and to implement a multi-faceted approach to reduce euthanasia and promote adoption at our city shelters. Thanks to our strong partnership with 150+ rescue groups and shelters, AC&C, the ASPCA, Maddie’s Fund, and other animal welfare organizations, we have made great strides since 2003 in saving the lives of NYC’s homeless cats and dogs. Euthanasia of healthy and treatable cats and dogs at AC&C has decreased every year, dropping from 32,000 in 2003 to 6,000 in 2013 – an all-time low. Our key life-saving programs, implemented by a dedicated staff of animal welfare professionals, have been honed and tested over a decade, with proven results. As we move forward towards our goal, we will continue to rely on our partners and the community collaboration that has made these achievements possible.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Aside from tracking the decrease in euthanasia at AC&C, which is the most basic quantitative indicator of our progress since 2003, the Alliance also monitors the individual progress and results of our specific initiatives. The combination of these efforts have resulted in steady progress towards our goal of a New York City where no dogs or cats of reasonable health or temperament are killed simply because they do not have homes.

    Wheels of Hope
    More than 14,700 dogs and cats — representing more than one-half (51 percent) of the animals entering AC&C shelters in 2013 — were transferred to partner shelters and rescue groups for adoption in 2013. Transfers from AC&C have increased by more than 166 percent, from 5,519 in 2003 to 14,732 in 2013. This increase in transfers has a direct correlation to the reduction of euthanasia are our city shelters, and the Alliance's Wheels of Hope transport fleet was instrumental in many of these transfers, moving more than 13,700 animals in 2013.

    New York City Feral Cat Initiative (NYCFCI)
    In 2013, the number of cats euthanized at the city shelters dropped significantly (34 percent), to 3,523, down from 5,414 in 2012. In 2003, nearly 20,000 cats were euthanized. The Alliance’s New York City Feral Cat Initiative (NYCFCI) continued its support of feral cat caretakers by providing them with information, assistance, giveaways, and specialized training in TNR, bottle-feeding, taming kittens, and neighborhood relations. The Alliance spoke with and educated New York City Council members and other community leaders about TNR and the New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene continued to disseminate TNR information on its website. Additionally, the Alliance also increased funding to promote the practice of TNR in New York City through specialized grants acquired from the ASPCA, the Petco Foundation, and a private foundation. The results of these combined efforts serve to reduce the number of feral and community cats who enter our city shelters, and therefore reduce euthanasia.

    Mega-Adoption Events
    In 2013, community-wide adoptions were robust, and adoptions at AC&C increased by 27 percent, to 6,104. Adoptions, transfers, and return-to-owners by community partners, totaled more than 30,000 animals. Alliance adoption events in 2013, including Adoptapalooza, Maddie's ® Pet Adoption Days, and Whiskers in Wonderland, yielded a significant number of adoptions. The Maddie's® Pet Adoption Days free adoption event in NYC, sponsored by Maddie's Fund®, resulted in 3,098 adoptions in a single weekend. Seventy shelter and rescue organizations participated in the two-day event.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Since 2003, euthanasia at AC&C has been reduced by 81% and New York City now has the lowest euthanasia rate for shelter animals per capita of any major city in the United States. The highlights from our recently published 2013 progress report are included below.

    2013 Progress Highlights
    • 8 out of every 10 lives saved
    • More than 60,000 spay/neuter surgeries
    • More than 14,700 transfers from AC&C
    • More than 13,700 animals transported through Wheels of Hope
    • More than 250,000 lives saved since 2003

    http://www.animalalliancenyc.org/about/progress2013.htm

    Our goal is now in sight, but in order to maintain the achievements of the past decade we must continue implementing the Alliance’s critical programs and facilitating partnerships within the animal welfare community to achieve our common mission of a no-kill New York City.

service areas

New York

Self-reported by organization

Areas Served Narrative

Primarily serving the five boroughs of NYC, with ties to the NY Metro area and beyond. Creating a community-based model being replicated in other areas of the country.

Self-reported by organization

Funding Needs

We remain on track to achieve “no-kill” in NYC by 2015, but are significantly challenged by the end of a multi-year, structured grant that has constituted the majority of our funding to date. 30,000+ dogs and cats enter city shelters in NYC each year.   While 2011 projected euthanasia is 73% less than during our baseline year of 2003 and lives saved since the Alliance was formed (2003-2010) total 150,776, there is still significant work to be done before our core mission is achieved.   Funding is greatly needed to support our life-saving programs, to allow us to achieve our humane goal of making NYC a no-kill community by 2015 and to sustain that success going forward.

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

MAYOR'S ALLIANCE FOR NYC'S ANIMALS INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals, Inc.

Leadership

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Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
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  • Board Chair and Board Members
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Principal Officer

Jane Hoffman

BIO

Jane Hoffman is a lawyer and outside of her work at the Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals, has served as the Chair of the Committee on Legal Issues Pertaining to Animals at the New York City Bar Association. At the 2007 American Bar Association national conference in San Francisco, Jane was honored with the inaugural Excellence in the Advancement of Animal Law Award.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Jane Hoffman

Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


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BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?