Human Services

Feed the Children, Inc.

  • Oklahoma City, OK
  • http://www.feedthechildren.org

Mission Statement

Providing hope and resources for those without life's essentials

Main Programs

  1. H.E.L.P. (Homeless Education and Literacy Program)
  2. Americans Feeding Americans
  3. disaster relief
  4. Hunger relief
  5. Child Sponsorship

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1967

chief executive

Kevin Hagan

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

Feed the Children, hunger, education, essentials, international, disaster relief, children

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

73-6108657

Physical Address

333 N. Meridian

Oklahoma City, 73107

Also Known As

Feed the Children

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

International Relief (Q33)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Since 1979, Feed the Children has grown into one of the largest U.S. based charities. By banding together to defeat hunger, Feed the Children distributed over $344 million in food, essentials, educational supplies, and medicine to over 10 million individuals in the United States and 18 other countries in fiscal year 2013.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

H.E.L.P. (Homeless Education and Literacy Program)

Feed the Children's H.E.L.P. works directly with NAEHCY (The National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth) to distribute backpacks full of supplies, book, and other essentials to homeless children in Title One public schools.

Category

None

Budget

Population Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

None

Program 2

Americans Feeding Americans

Established in 2009 to deal with the economic downturn in the U.S., the Americans Feeding Americans Caravan has provided help to more than 400,000 families to date.  The program provides food, personal care items and Avon products to families in cities that have experienced job losses, foreclosures, plant closings, high unemployment and increased poverty rates.

Category

None

Budget

Population Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Single Parents

General Public/Unspecified

Program 3

disaster relief

Feed the Children stays prepared to respond when disasters hit. In the United States and around the world, we respond quickly with food, shelter, supplies, and medical help.

Category

None

Budget

Population Served

General Public/Unspecified

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

None

Program 4

Hunger relief

For Feed the Children, hunger relief happens all around the world every day. Our four-pillar approach breaks the cycles of hunger and poverty, helping communities get back on their feet toward self-sufficiency.

Category

None

Budget

Population Served

None

None

None

Program 5

Child Sponsorship

Providing food, essentials and educational support for children in need in the U.S. and around the world

Category

None

Budget

Population Served

None

None

None

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Self-reported by organization

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Our goal is to measurably reduce child hunger by combatting malnutrition and food insecurity (and their root causes) for children in the United States and around the world.

    In the United States, we fight food insecurity by making nutritious foods more accessible to families with limited resources and help families to learn why and how to serve healthier foods.

    In the Global South (formerly called the Developing World) this means reducing stunting in children under the age of five, improving child survival, improving access to nutritious foods for children of all ages in the communities where we work directly, and working to empower families and communities to address food insecurity and to improve their overall well-being.

    We also meet immediate needs in additional communities and with other partner agencies by providing food and other life essentials in low-income communities in all 50 states in the U.S., and in 18 countries around the world.

    We have some big goals for the next five years. We will continue to serve at least 350,000 nourishing meals a day to schoolchildren in the Global South, and we will reduce malnutrition and child deaths by 25% or more in Global South communities with approximately 330,000 people (66,000 households).

    In the United States, we will work intensively within 3-5 low-income communities to eliminate food deserts (areas where groceries are not easily available) and measurably improve food security, child nutrition, and the proportion of children who have access to free or low-cost preschool. We will also continue to provide nearly 100 million pounds each year of food, educational materials, backpacks with educational supplies, and other life essentials to low-income communities in the U.S. through our network of over 1,200 partner agencies (food pantries, churches, and other service providers).
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    We believe that we need to collaborate with others working to defeat hunger, especially to promote strategies that we know will help children survive and thrive. Feed the Children program staff members - both in our country programs and in our headquarters teams - have supported dozens of organizations in using effective strategies around the world, along with on-going training of our own Feed the Children staff. We are always looking for improved strategies to help children survive and thrive.

    In the Global South, our main strategies are to reduce hunger by:
    • providing hot, nutritious lunches for low-income schoolchildren to improve their cognitive development and school attendance.
    • providing effective health and nutrition promotion to parents of young children and pregnant women through the Care Group strategy (www.CareGroupInfo.org).

    Studies show that the Care Group strategy consistently outperforms other methods in reducing child deaths and malnutrition across an entire community at very low cost. We will continue to expand this model in our programs and also partner with other organizations to scale up the model. Project staff members also partner with local communities to make lasting improvements in food/nutrition, heath/water, education, and livelihoods (our “four pillars”), and empower women.

    As part of our strategy, Feed the Children is increasingly conducting formative research (e.g., barrier analysis and positive deviant studies) in order to better understand the barriers and enablers of effective change in the communities in which we work. We also seek to identify the uncommon – but successful – behaviors and strategies that enable some poor families to find better solutions to a problem than their peers.

    In the United States, we will improve access to fresh, healthy foods for parents and children. In these communities (using a Care Group nutrition education program), we will train thousands of parents in child and family nutrition and the skills necessary to feed children healthy meals on a limited budget.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    For fiscal year 2014, Feed the Children’s budget included cash contributions, gifts-in-kind, and other revenues totaling $454 million. Taking into account all of our U.S. and internationalsubsidaries, we employ a staff of 660 people. Over 1,000 corporate donors provide food, other essential products and cash. In September 2014, 12,700 child sponsors provided $30 a month to our programs in the Global South. In the U.S., we operate five regional distribution centers which ship food and essentials to partners. FTC Transportation, our trucking division, uses their fleet of 40 semi trucks to ship the supplies. In FY 2013, we delivered 98 million pounds of food of food, essential items, and educational supplies to local food pantries, agencies and houses of worship in all 50 states who then distributed these items to people in need (FY 2014 numbers are not final at the time of this writing). We operate three “Teacher Stores” around the country where teachers in local title one schools can come and receive free supplies for their classrooms. We work closely with key partners to run our Summer Food and Education Program in Oklahoma.

    In the Global South, we partner closely with government departments of health, local school systems, and other non-governmental organizations to implement our Child-Focused Community Development (CFCD) strategy. Funding comes primarily from U.S.-based individual, church, and corporate donors. Less than one percent of our total budget comes from the U.S. Government. Feed the Children and our subsidiary, World Neighbors, employ more than 400 experienced community development, health, education, and livelihoods professionals in 21 countries.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Indicators measured quantitatively at baseline and at final by assessing program participants and also via qualitative evaluations (e.g., focus groups).


    Summer Food and Education Program
    1. # of meals served to children/families over the summer in areas where majority of children receive free/reduced school lunch during the school year

    Food and Essentials Program
    2. # of lbs of food, educational materials, essentials distributed
    3. Estimated # of children assisted by delivery of food, educational materials, essentials
    4. # of backpacks distributed to homeless children in public schools
    5. Dollar value of products provided through the Teacher Stores

    Global South
    (Food/Nutrition, Health/Water, women’s empowerment):
    1. % underweight, % stunted of children 0-5 years of age [will soon assess children 0-2 yrs instead of 0-5 yrs]
    2. % of mothers/caregivers (of students at Feed the Children schools) who volunteer time/other resources for community child feeding plan
    3. % of households using improved clean water source; with access to improved sanitation facility; with soap & water at hand washing stations
    4. % of children 12-23 m of age fully immunized against common communicable disease
    5. Child dietary diversity score
    6. % of children 6-23 m of age with minimum acceptable diet (per World Health Organization’s guidelines)
    7. % of mothers/pregnant women who suffer from depression (depression is one of the highest burdens of disease for women, linked with child stunting)
    8. Prevalence of gender-based violence (measured by proxy as prevalence of accepting attitudes towards gender-based violence)
    (Indicators on Livelihoods and Education available upon request)
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    In the United States last year, we distributed 103 million pounds of food, educational materials, and other life essentials directly and through more than 1,243 partner agencies. We also distributed 65,000 backpacks for homeless children who attend public schools.

    We tested an innovative hybrid model of summer feeding program in 2014 and began research to identify what keeps children from participating in summer feeding programs. This research is not complete yet, so we will expand both the program and the research in 2015 in our efforts to measurably increase the number of school children who receive sufficient nutrition during the summer months.

    We are at the beginning stages of moving into more proactive long-term work to identify the roots of poverty in the U.S. and to address those. The Community Food and Education Oasis Projects described in other sections above will provide us with the setting and resources to begin the research and program testing necessary to inform future projects and ensure that the work we do measurably and effectively reduces poverty and hunger in the U.S.

    In the Global South, we have made progress in the following areas:

    • In Malawi, we have improved early childhood development and nutrition programs by strengthening 847 community-based child care centers and have reached pregnant women and mothers of children under the age of 2 years with key nutrition and health messages in 847 communities using the Care Group model.
    • We have established Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLA) and federations of VSLA in the Philippines and in Malawi.
    • In all the countries where we work, we have supported village schools by providing 350,000 hot, nutritious meals every day, and providing school supplies, Vitamin A and deworming medicines. We have established VSLA and agricultural/livestock-based household income-generating activities.
    • We have trained staff members in Malawi, Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania in the Care Group model

    We have plans to train staff members in Haiti, Central America program countries (El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua) and Philippines in the Care Group model in the near future.

    We have not yet implemented Care Groups and staff training on statistical surveys and program design in all of communities where we work. In 2015 we will reduce maternal and child malnutrition by rolling out new Care Group projects in 24,000 households in Kenya, Haiti, and the Philippines, and will continue our Care Groups project that reaches approximately 60,000 additional households in Malawi with nutrition and health education and behavior change. We will continue to promote VSLA and improved agricultural practices as well as other income-generating activities in urban areas of Malawi, as well.

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

Blog

The organization's Blog

Social Media

@feedthechildren

@feedthechilden

@feedthechildrenorg

@feedthechildrenorg

Funding Needs

We need donations to transport food, personal care items, school supplies and emergency disaster relief to our recipients.  You can sponsor an entire truck of food and supplies for $8,200.  You can also create special projects to raise funds through your community, your church and your school.

Videos

photos




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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

FEED THE CHILDREN INC
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Feed the Children, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Kevin Hagan

BIO

Kevin Hagan brings an impressive background in food distribution and operational management to his role as president and CEO of Feed The Children. He also comes with a keen passion to help those in need around the world. Most recently, he served as chief operating officer for Good360, an Alexandria, Virginia-based nonprofit organization dedicated to fulfilling the needs of nonprofits with corporate product donations. While there, he was responsible for day-to-day operations including customer service, human resources, security and compliance, and distribution logistics. Before Good360, Kevin honed his industry expertise at U.S. Foodservice, Inc., the second largest broadline foodservice distributor in the country with more than $20 billion in revenues. Kevin also spent time in the government sector at the U.S. Postal Service headquarters, an organization with more than 800,000 employees. For nearly 10 years he worked as an innovative national level manager overseeing several transformational initiatives and organizational restructures to increase operational efficiencies.Kevin received his bachelor’s degree in History, Political Science, and German from Mercer University in Georgia and earned his master’s degree in International Affairs from The American University in Washington, DC.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Rick England

England Ford

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

No

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?