Educational Institutions

Junior Achievement of Southeast Texas

  • Houston, TX
  • www.jahouston.org

Mission Statement

Junior Achievement's mission is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy.

Main Programs

  1. JA BizTown
  2. JA Company Program
  3. JA Finance Park
  4. JA Inspire
  5. JA Traditional Programs - Elementary
  6. JA Traditional Programs - Middle Grades
  7. JA Traditional Programs - High School
Service Areas

Self-reported

Texas

Junior Achievement delivers programs in greater Houston and surrounding areas. Headquartered in Houston, JA has offices in Beaumont, TX and Lake Charles, LA.

ruling year

1994

Principal Officer

Self-reported

Mr. Richard W Franke

Keywords

Self-reported

education, business, enterprise

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EIN

74-1153957

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Junior Achievement empowers young people to own their future economic success by enhancing the relevancy of education. During the 2014-2015 school year JA of Southeast Texas will provide work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy programs to approximately 310,000 students.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

JA BizTown

JA BizTown encompasses important elements of work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy, providing students in grades four through six with a solid foundation of business, economics and free enterprise education. Furthermore, the program content augments students' core curriculum in social studies (e.g., citizenship, government), reading, writing and mathematics. Throughout the program, students are encouraged to use critical thinking skills to learn about key economic concepts as they explore and enhance their understanding of free enterprise. Through daily lessons, hands-on activities and active participation in a simulated community designed to support differentiated learning styles, students develop a strong understanding of the relationship between what they learn in school and their successful participation in a local economy. JA BizTown helps prepare students for a lifetime of learning and academic achievement.

Category

Educational Programs

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

None

None

Budget

Program 2

JA Company Program

JA Company Program provides basic economic education for high school students by allowing them to organize and operate an actual business. Students not only learn how businesses function, they also learn about the structure of the U.S. free enterprise system and the benefits it provides. Volunteer consultants from the local business community employ a variety of hands-on activities and technological supplements to challenge students to use innovative thinking. The business skills that students learn in this after-school program will prove valuable as they begin to consider higher education and career choices. Each JA Company Program kit contains a plethora of resources, including a handbook for teachers and volunteers and interactive, take-home materials for students. Materials are packaged in a self-contained kit that includes detailed activity plans for the volunteer and enough materials for 24 students. All JA programs are designed to support the skills and competencies identified by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills. JA programs also correlate with state standards in social studies, English, and mathematics, and to Common Core State Standards.

Category

Educational Programs

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

None

None

Budget

Program 3

JA Finance Park

JA Finance Park gives middle and high school grade students an opportunity to develop personal money management skills, acquire personal finance knowledge, and prepare for the financial decisions and challenges of their adult lives. JA Finance Park introduces students to personal finance and career explorations through classroom instruction complemented by a day-long, hands-on experience in which they apply learned concepts in a life-like community. During this one-day experience, students assume randomly assigned family and income scenarios and visit businesses to gather information for their personal financial decision-making. Participating students use bank services, contribute to charities, purchase housing, transportation, furnishings, food, health care, and other expenses, make investment decisions and work to balance their personal budgets. Real-life members of the community, such as parents and local businesses, are actively involved in the JA Finance Park experience. JA Finance Park students develop knowledge of economic and personal finance concepts, understand budgets and the importance of financial planning and gathering information, become familiar with the use of financial services, utilize financial decision-making processes, and become better prepared for their future roles as consumers, investors, and workers.

Category

Educational Programs

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

None

None

Budget

Program 4

JA Inspire

Our largest and most aggressive campaign to address work readiness needs is JA Inspire, which was launched in Spring 2014. JA Inspire was the largest student gathering in the near 100 year history of the organization involving more than 8,000 eighth grade students of all demographic backgrounds. The job awareness fair enabled students to interact with business representatives and see displays from many Southeast Texas companies. Students learned about the skills and education required for these jobs; many of which fall into the category of "middle skills." Students then developed individual career maps through materials and instruction provided by JASET and participating companies. This program was a huge success and is continuing to be expanded. During the 2014-15 school year JA Inspire will be repeated in Cy-Fair ISD with another 8,000 students and expanded to east Harris County and approximately another 10,000 students.

Category

Educational Programs

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

None

None

Budget

Program 5

JA Traditional Programs - Elementary

JA’s elementary school programs are the foundation of its K-12 curricula. Six sequential themes, each with five hands-on activities, as well as an after-school and capstone experience, work to change students’ lives by helping them understand business and economics.

Category

Educational Programs

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

None

None

Budget

Program 6

JA Traditional Programs - Middle Grades

The middle grades programs build on concepts the students learned in Junior Achievement’s elementary school program and help teens make difficult decisions about how to best prepare for their educational and professional future. The programs supplement standard social studies curricula and develop communication skills that are essential to success in the business world.

Category

Educational Programs

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

None

None

Budget

Program 7

JA Traditional Programs - High School

As high school students begin to position themselves for their future, there are many unanswered questions about what lies ahead. Junior Achievement’s high school programs help students make informed, intelligent decisions about their future, and foster skills that will be highly useful in the business world.

Category

Educational Programs

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

None

None

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    JA's goal is to impact the lives of tomorrow's workforce by providing a connection between what is learned in school and the real world. JA programs are designed to bridge the gap between education and reaching career goals.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    JA places a significant focus on economically disadvantaged schools and communities and strives to provide programs where the need is the greatest. Last year, approximately 56% of JASET’s participants were considered economically disadvantaged based on their participation in the free/reduced lunch program (source: Texas Education Agency).
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    JA of Southeast Texas delivers volunteer led hands on experiential learning programs to students. These age appropriate programs are developed nationally by Junior Achievement USA. These programs focus on the three pillars of JA: work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    JA alumni are capable of setting education and career goals and attaining such goals. It is JA's primary focus to prepare a more capable workforce of tomorrow which in turn enriches the community.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    By building lasting relationships with corporate, foundation and individual donors, Junior Achievement of Southeast Texas has sustained impact of its meaningful programs for many years. As students complete JA programs they are given the tools needed to set education and career goals and in turn become contributing members of the community.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Texas

Junior Achievement delivers programs in greater Houston and surrounding areas. Headquartered in Houston, JA has offices in Beaumont, TX and Lake Charles, LA.

Social Media

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Junior Achievement of Southeast Texas Inc
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Junior Achievement of Southeast Texas

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone and website
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Principal Officer

Mr. Richard W Franke

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. James L Gallogly

LyondellBasell

Term: July 2013 - June 2015

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?