Educational Institutions

Houston Community College Foundation

  • Houston, TX
  • www.hccsfoundation.org

Mission Statement

Incorporated in 1976, the mission of the Houston Community College Foundation is to provide outstanding service to our community, internal and external, through valued relationships, efficient financial investments and personal guidance to enhance the donor and student educational experience. We work to enhance the quality of life of our community and of our fellow citizens through fundraising efforts that improve access to higher education, support career and technology training, and advance student learning at Houston Community College. The HCC Foundation supports HCC's mission by fundraising and providing financial assistance in support of student scholarships and endowments, in addition to select projects that have the potential to advance student learning at HCC. As an outcome, the HCC Foundation and its supporters improve access to higher education, support career and technology training, and advance student learning at Houston Community College.

Main Programs

  1. HCC Foundation Scholarships
  2. HCC "Fulfilling the Dream" Workforce Scholarship Fund
  3. HCC Engineering Scholarships
Service Areas

Self-reported

Texas

HCC serves tthe greater Houston area, which covers more than 600 square miles and has a population of approximately 2.25 million people. HCC has campuses that are strategically located in each quadrant of the city,

ruling year

1976

Principal Officer

Self-reported

Ms. Carme Williams

Keywords

Self-reported

Educational Access Scholarships Diversity Adult Education Higher Education

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EIN

74-1885205

Also Known As

HCC Foundation

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Community/Junior College (B41)

Higher Education Institutions (B40)

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

HCC Foundation Scholarships

Every year, the HCC Foundation awards hundreds of scholarships to students attending HCC. These scholarships pay for students' tuition, fees, and textbooks. The scholarships range from merit scholarships, scholarships that target students pursuing specific career goals, and scholarships based purely on a student's financial need.

Category

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

Program 2

HCC "Fulfilling the Dream" Workforce Scholarship Fund

To ensure that Houston's economic growth continues to thrive, our community must have access to learn the skills needed to enter the workforce and build successful careers, raise families, and prosper. Middle skills jobs are well within reach for under- and unemployed workers, as long as they can attend training programs that prepare them to be job ready. HCC is a primary source for Houstonians eager for workforce training opportunities. HCC has strategic initiatives to bridge the skills gap and train "day-one job-ready" employees to fill high-demand, high-wage jobs like welding, machining, respiratory technician, and more. However, too many students miss out on educational opportunities because they cannot pay for it, no matter how modest the cost. HCC's "Fulfilling the Dream" Workforce Scholarship Fund will help students pay costs such as tuition, books, supplies, tools, immunizations, and other costs associated with attending college.

Category

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

Program 3

HCC Engineering Scholarships

The engineering and design firms in the U.S. forecast a significant shortage of engineering professionals as many of their workers near retirement. As we do for many business sectors, HCC is responding to these future workforce requirements while also serving the needs of its students by providing an affordable and clear pathway towards a degree and career. In 2012, The University of Texas at Tyler Houston Engineering Center at HCC opened, followed by the opening of The Texas A&M-Chevron Engineering Academy at HCC in 2015. These academies allow students to take lower-division engineering courses at HCC, leading to an Associate of Science in Engineering Science (ASES) degree. Upon completion, eligible students then enter into the upper division courses offered by UT Tyler at HCC's Alief campus or at the Dwight Look College of Engineering at Texas A&M. Scholarships will help a student's ability to attend HCC and progress on to a four-year university to complete their engineering degree.

Category

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Financial barriers are the primary reason that low- and moderate-income students don’t go to college, and financial uncertainty is why students drop out once they are there. Even HCC’s relatively modest tuition and fees, which are 70% less than that of Texas’s four-year institutions, are obstacles for many Houstonians. Approximately two-thirds of all HCC students receive some form of financial aid.

    One of HCC Foundation’s primary imperatives is to help the thousands of Houston students who qualify for some, but very little, financial aid. Lacking financial support and family resources, these students often go directly into jobs that offer few long-term opportunities. Those who do enroll in college often feel more pressure to drop out. The HCC Foundation seeks to remove the financial barriers facing these students and to encourage them to consider higher education as a real possibility.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    The HCC Foundation supports HCC’s mission in three main areas: funding student scholarships and endowments; capital projects and program support; and faculty grants and awards. Of these areas, our primary objectives are to fund student scholarships and special academic projects (such as funding for our Adult Education programs).

    Our primary scholarship project is the Opportunity 14 Scholarship program. It is structured as an endowment to ensure that these resources are available in perpetuity to generations of Houston students. Our financial goal is to fully fund the $30 million endowment in the next few years. Ultimately, the Opportunity 14 Scholarship program will bridge the gap and serve as the final “safety net” of financial assistance for students who qualify for some, but insufficient, amounts of federal or state aid. It will help them to stay in school and increase the rate at which students receive Associates Degrees or workforce certificates.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    We are effective because we have a clear understanding of our students’ – and our city’s – needs, and we are relatively nimble for a large organization. We have piloted successful student programs that have earned national recognition. We can quickly craft special workforce programs based on a particular business sector’s needs.

    We are also strong financial stewards. Over the last few years, HCC has expanded its infrastructure to serve 40% more students, without substantially increasing administrative overhead, and has increased classroom efficiency to 92%.

    HCC is one of the most efficient producers of learning, having reduced the average cost per student from $4,100 in 2006 to $3,325 in 2011. Today we are educating more students at a reduced average cost per student of $550, and with far greater outcomes.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    At HCC, our measures of success are focused on how our students are doing. We have identified ten areas, which we continuously monitor: Access, Student Engagement, Financial Aid, Persistence and Retention, Completion, Transfer, Faculty Ratios, Placement, and Satisfaction. The most recent data on each of these dimensions are available to the public through an Academic Dashboard on our website, demonstrating our commitment to being the most relevant and transparent community college in the country.

    At the HCC Foundation, we measure and report on the impact of the academic and student support programs we fund. We also monitor the success of our scholarship programs, including the persistence and completion rates of our scholarship recipients. For example, we found that the 99% persistence rate of students in our largest scholarship program – Opportunity 14 – greatly surpasses HCC’s overall persistence rate for students in a similar cohort.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    HCC is ranked first in Texas and fifth in nation for granting Associate Degrees, and we are ranked #1 among Texas community colleges for placing students in jobs when they graduate. HCC has the top workforce program in Texas, with 25 programs recognized as exemplary. All five of HCC’s Early College High Schools earned an “exemplary” rating by the TEA.

    With one of the largest and more diverse student bodies in the country, HCC’s Associate Degree graduates earn an average of $59,700 annually, 35% more than students with a high school diploma. They enjoy a 14.9% average rate of return on their HCC investment.

    HCC was one of the first to receive a distinguished national “Leader College” designation by Achieving the Dream, which we still merit today.

    The HCC Foundation has also been recognized for our work, and is among the top 1% of community college foundations in the U.S.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Texas

HCC serves tthe greater Houston area, which covers more than 600 square miles and has a population of approximately 2.25 million people. HCC has campuses that are strategically located in each quadrant of the city,

Funding Needs

Our greatest need is in continuing to build our scholarship funds. With our success in meeting students' financial needs - particularly those who do not qualify for financial aid - we need to continuously replenish and build up those funds. We are trying to balance our growth between endowed scholarships (so that funds can be available in perpetuity) with traditional scholarships (in which the full value of the scholarship gift is available for use within a short timeframe).

Affiliations + Memberships

Association of Fundraising Professionals

Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE)

photos


External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

HOUSTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOUNDATION
Fiscal year: Sep 01-Aug 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Houston Community College Foundation

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone and website
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Ms. Carme Williams

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

"HCC is composed of 13 Centers of Excellence and many satellite centers that serve the diverse communities across Houston by preparing individuals to live and work in an increasingly international and technological society. HCC is one of the country's largest singly-accredited, open-admission community colleges offering associate degrees, certificates, workforce training, and lifelong learning opportunities. With open enrollment and tuition that is 80% less than that of Texas' four-year universities, HCC makes college education a reality for more than 70,000 students each semester. Even so, too many miss out on a higher education because they can't pay for it. That's where the HCC Foundation comes in: raising money to fund scholarships and other education initiatives. Experts see college as key to building our economy with a self-supporting population and reduced social costs. Graduates with an associate degree will earn $577,000 more in their lifetime than those with only a high school diploma. At a time when higher education is critical, the HCC Foundation is working to give Houstonians an opportunity that can impact all of our lives."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Shawn Taylor

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?