Disease, Disorders, Medical Disciplines

Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc., National Office

  • Dallas, TX
  • http://www.komen.org

Mission Statement

Nancy G. Brinker promised her sister that she would do everything in her power to end breast cancer forever. That promise is now Susan G. Komen for the Cure®, the global leader of the breast cancer movement, having invested more than $2.2 billion since inception in 1982. As the world’s largest grassroots network of breast cancer survivors and activists, we’re working together to save lives, empower people, ensure quality care for all and energize science to find the cures. Thanks to events like the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure® and the Susan G. Komen 3-Day for the Cure®, and generous contributions from our partners, sponsors and fellow supporters, we have become the largest source of nonprofit funds dedicated to the fight against breast cancer in the world.

Main Programs

  1. Research & Scientific Programs

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1992

chief executive

Dr. Judith Salerno M.D.

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

Our promise: To save lives and end breast cancer forever by empowering people, ensuring quality care for all and energizing science to find the cures.

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

75-1835298

Also Known As

Susan G. Komen

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Cancer (G30)

Cancer (W30)

Cancer Research (H30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Since 1982, Komen for the Cure has played a critical role in every major advance in the fight against breast cancer – transforming how the world talks about and treats this disease and helping to turn millions of breast cancer patients into breast cancer survivors. We are proud of our contribution to some real victories:

More early detection – nearly 75 percent of women over 40 years old now receive regular mammograms, the single most effective tool for detecting breast cancer early (in 1982, less than 30 percent received a clinical exam).
More hope – the five-year survival rate for breast cancer, when caught early before it spreads beyond the breast, is now 98 percent (compared to 74 percent in 1982).
More research – the federal government now devotes more than $900 million each year to breast cancer research, treatment and prevention (compared to $30 million in 1982).
More survivors – America’s 2.5 million breast cancers survivors, the largest group of cancer survivors in the U.S., are a living testament to the power of society and science to save lives.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Research & Scientific Programs

A significant portion of Komen research funding goes toward the new and exciting fields of cancer biology and genetics. Some Komen-sponsored programs already are making an impact for patients, and early results from other grants show potential for the development of future cures. Current treatments work best when breast cancer is detected early. Komen continues its investment into early detection, devoting research funds to the development of better screening methods and improving the precision and accuracy of existing screening tools. Komen works to ensure that all people, regardless of race, income, geographic location, or insurance status, have access to screening, and if diagnosed, to quality, effective treatment.

Category

Cancer Research

Budget

Population Served

Adults

Other Minorities

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Self-reported by organization

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Since 1982, Komen has played a critical role in every major advance in the fight against breast cancer – transforming how the world talks about and treats this disease and helping to turn millions of breast cancer patients into breast cancer survivors. Susan G. Komen is the boldest community fueling the best science and making the biggest impact in the fight against breast cancer. We have invested over $2 billion to fulfill our promise, working to end breast cancer in the U.S. and throughout the world through ground-breaking research, community health outreach, advocacy and programs in more than 50 countries.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Research Fast Facts: Common Chemotherapeutics, BRCA Gene Mutations, Clinical Trials, Complementary Medicine, Early Detection, HER2 Breast Cancer, Metastasis, Prevention, Triple Negative Breast Cancer, Vaccines
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Research: Common Chemotherapeutics, BRCA Gene Mutations, Clinical Trials, Complementary Medicine, Early Detection, HER2 Breast Cancer, Metastasis, Prevention, Triple Negative Breast Cancer, Vaccines; Education; Screening funding; Treatment funding
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Progress in the fight against Breast Cancer: - More early detection and effective treatment - More hope - More research - More survivors
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    More early detection and effective treatment – Currently, about 70 percent of women 40 and older receive regular mammograms, the single most effective screening tool to find breast cancer early. Since 1990, early detection and effective treatment have resulted in a 33 percent decline in breast cancer mortality in the U.S. More hope – In 1980, the 5-year relative survival rate for women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer (cancer confined to the breast) was about 74 percent. Today, that number is 98 percent. More research – The federal government now devotes more than $850 million each year to breast cancer research, treatment and prevention (compared to $30 million in 1982). More survivors – Currently, there are about 3 million breast cancers survivors, the largest group of cancer survivors in the U.S.

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

Social Media

@SusanGKomen

@SusanGKomen

@komenforthecure

@SusanGKomen

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance

External Reviews

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits
Source: greatnonprofits.org

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

SUSAN G KOMEN BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION INC
Fiscal year: Apr 01-Mar 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc., National Office

Leadership

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  • Address, phone, website and contact information
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  • Board Chair and Board Members
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CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Dr. Judith Salerno M.D.

BIO

Before joining the IOM, Dr. Salerno was Deputy Director of the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She oversaw the Institute’s research into aging, including research on Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases, frailty and function in late life, and the social, behavioral and demographic aspects of aging. As the NIA’s senior geriatrician, Dr. Salerno was vitally interested in improving the health and well-being of older persons, and designed public-private initiatives to address aging stereotypes, novel approaches to support training of new investigators in aging, and programs to communicate health and research advances to the public. Before joining the NIA in 2001, Dr. Salerno directed the continuum of Geriatrics and Extended Care programs across the nation for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Washington, D.C. While at the VA, she launched widely recognized national initiatives for pain management and improving end-of-life care. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Salerno was Associate Chief of Staff at the VA Medical Center in Washington, D.C. where she developed and implemented innovative approaches to geriatric primary care and coordinated area-wide geriatric medicine training. Dr. Salerno also co-founded the Washington D.C. Area Geriatric Education Center Consortium, a collaboration of more than 160 educational and community organizations within the Baltimore-Washington region. A board-certified physician in internal medicine, Dr. Salerno earned her M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School in 1985 and a Master of Science degree in Health Policy from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1976.

STATEMENT FROM THE CEO

"Led by more than 100,000 survivors and activists, we are the world's largest and most progressive grassroots network fighting to end breast cancer forever. As the face and voice of the global breast cancer movement … We are local activists in more than 120 cities and communities, mobilizing more than 1.7 million friends and neighbors every year through events like the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure® Series—the world's largest and most successful awareness and fundraising event for breast cancer. We are advocates at the local, state and federal level, fighting for the screening and treatment programs that save lives and the research that brings us closer to the cures. We are global citizens working with local health groups around the world and through our Web site, komen.org, to help millions of women in nearly 200 countries overcome the social, cultural and economic barriers to breast health and treatment."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ms. Linda P Custard

Custard/Pitts Land & Cattle Co.

Term: Apr 2013 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?