Educational Institutions

Texas Hope Literacy Inc

  • Hurst, TX
  • www.texashopeliteracy.com

Mission Statement

The mission of Texas HOPE Literacy is to transform offenders through the HOPE Community Reintegration Models using peer driven education within an evidence-based framework in order for them to re-enter society as productive and contributing members of their communities.
The vision is to be the model program for prisons and jails everywhere.

Main Programs

  1. HOPE /Community/Classroom Reintegration Models
  2. Reentry and Community Resources

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Service Areas

Self-reported

Texas

No one truly knows a nation until one has been inside its jails. A nation should not be judged by how it treats its highest citizens, but its lowest ones. In 1997, a peer-driven literacy program began within theTexas prisons in to eradicate functional illiteracy and provide redemptive reintegration of this disadvantaged population.

Since prisons are built on reading failure of 4th graders and nearly 75% of inmates are either functionally illiterate or completely illiterate (19%) www.invisible children.org, it is no wonder that they face huge challenges to staying out of prison post-release. Many have undiagnosed lear

ruling year

2000

CEO

Self-reported

Ms. Lucy H. Smith

Keywords

Self-reported

Literacy, Education, Incarceration, Life Skills, Reintegration, Reentry, Criminal Justice

Notes from the Nonprofit

Awards 2000 Governor's Religious Volunteer Award
2001 Dallas Reads Champion Educator in Adult Literacy
2005 National Crime Prevention Council Recognition
2005 Governor's Most Innovative Program Award
2006 Governor's Community Capacity Builder Award
Products 501(c)(3) Non-profit organization
We provide services to disadvantaged incarcerated men and women during incarceration and post-release.

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EIN

75-2829515

 Number

0662938807

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

Remedial Reading, Reading Encouragement (B92)

Counseling Support Groups (F60)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Since 1997, Texas HOPE Literacy has provided educational peer-driven classes that remediates functional illiteracy as well as life skills Reentry services for over 100,000 inmates. During this time, we have designed, developed and field tested three HOPE Community Reintegration Models to provide highly structured environments for inmates within the prison and county jail systems. Within these models, we offer evidence-based curriculum to prepare inmates for their release back to our communities and to their families. Since 75 to 80% of children will go to prison, it is critical that we reach these inmate parents to break the cycle of the next generation going to prison. Packed within these models are leadership positions where inmates can practice appropriate actions, attitudes and behaviors prior to release.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

HOPE /Community/Classroom Reintegration Models

Since 1997, HOPE has trained 1000's of incarcerated men and women to tutor their functionally illiterate peers in a one-on-one setting so they can earn their GED prior to release; many have learning disabilities. Current focus is on incarcerated parents since they are the direct link to their children. Our organization is the originator of the HOPE Community Reintegration Model and programs for prisons and jails. All models have leadership opportunities where the inmates can practice positive behaviors and attitudes. We have field-tested them on prison and county jail sites. HOPE has received three Texas Governor's awards and national recognition. Our goals are to equip the inmates to be responsible citizens during their incarceration post-release so that they will be better parents to their children, our neighborhoods and communities will be safer, and recidivism lowered.

Category

Rehabilitation Services for Offenders

Population(s) Served

Adults

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Budget

Program 2

Reentry and Community Resources

Texas HOPE Literacy (HOPE) provides inmate reintegration programs in both jails and prisons. The HOPE reintegration models create safe communities where inmates can live, learn and grow together. These are specifically designed to target recidivism, remediate the functionally illiterate and give them the tools they need post-release. Training and modeling appropriate actions, attitudes, and behaviors that they practice prior to release is much more effective than warehousing. The integrated design of peer tutoring is unique within the jail/prison settings; even more powerful when it is in concert with facilitated life skills, education centers and spiritual development courses that employ a holistic approach. Transformative learning involves change, a change in a person comprehends, perceives and believes about their world and themselves. This is crucial to change. When transformation occurs on the inside first, the outside becomes healthy.

New Reentry Office - 2014
Texas HOPE Literacy opened a Reentry & Community Resource Office in Irving, Texas to assist HOPE alumni in their reentry needs after incarceration. HOPE is a family that begins on the inside and transitions with them to help them stay free. The same principles they learned in the program during their incarceration will be supported and reinforced as they reenter their HOPE Family community post-release.
Studies of County jail recidivism are few and far between. In 2003, the Montgomery County Department of Rehabilitation and Correction in the state of Maryland conducted a study to examine recidivism within a jail population.3 This was done to determine the research needs of a county jail system, and provide recommendations about how to deal with recidivism overall. Their definition of re-arrest/re-indictment was that of an offender, who was arrested by police, and then subsequently indicted for the offense by the State Attorney. This definition may differ from other studies where only an arrest occurred, but charges were not necessarily filed. They found that after one year, 41% of males/32% of females, were re-arrested/re-indicted for other offenses. When they added violations of probation, the percentages increased to 46% for males/38% for females.

Individualized case management begins with a needs assessment to identify and link them to services specific to their needs. Reentry calls for a broad systems approach to managing inmates returning to the community. The establishment of Reentry and community Resources Office makes it increasingly possible to successfully link to community partners, families, justice professionals and others. When managed well, alcohol and drug treatment alone saves $7 in incarceration costs for every $1 spent. When education and reentry life skills are includes, the savings is greater.In addition to case management assistance, the office plans to offer a schedule of appropriate classes to assist in decreasing recidivism.

Category

People/Families with of People with Developmental Disabilities

Population(s) Served

Substance Abusers (Drug/Alcohol Abusers)

Adults

Offenders/Ex-offenders

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Texas HOPE Literacy, Inc meets all descriptors of Texas Senate Bill 345, as defined in Texas Government Code 501.009 for volunteers in Texas prisons. These are as follows: Literacy and education programs, Life skills programs, Job skills programs, Parent training programs, Drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs, Support group programs, Arts and crafts programs, Other programs determined to aid inmates in the transition between confinement and society and to reduce incidence of recidivism among inmates.

    Short Term Goals: Beginning 2014 - Open 3 Texas prison sites, expand program at Dallas County Jail, provide Reentry classes for former program inmates outside of prisons and jails.
    Long Term Goals: Open 2-3 Texas prison sites annually, open a new County Jail, expand to open a juvenile facility.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Increase public awareness
    Build strong collaborations
    Promote volunteerism
    Set up aggressive social media campaigns
    Develop and utilize technology for program expansion
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Cost effective program delivery: Utilization of inmate peer educators to tutor, large Volunteer Base, professional volunteers deliver evidence-based life skills curriculum, minimal staff requirements compared to inmate population reached, Board of Directors is engaged with our mission and vision, Donors are supportive of mission and vision, our organization has an excellent reputation with the criminal justice systems, especially since we were the first peer-driven inmate program in Texas, and now Texas prison system leads the nation in inmate peer-driven programs because if our efforts, we maintain strong accountability with our services and monies donated.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    We track inmate students who are studying for their GED through earned achievement scores and results of GED testing.
    Inmates with leadership positions are required to attend leadership coaching, and are evaluated in their positions.
    Inmates apply to be in the program, attend orientation, and are required to demonstrate positive actions, attitudes and behaviors.
    We monitor and work with those who demonstrate negative behaviors, consequence or remove them from the program if necessary.
    We maintain files on site for all inmate members
    We set up a tracking device for them post release.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Our plans were to expand quickly. Our challenges have not been inmate related, instead they have been environmental. After 10 years on one site, a change in Wardens necessitated our closing the program.
    Another site was closed by the legislature in 2013. It was here that we designed, developed and field-tested the HOPE community model over a ten-year period. This was a very challenging environment since many of the unit staff was antagonistic towards our program.
    What we have accomplished is the development of three highly structured models along with evidence-based courses that meet criminal justice criteria for inmates. We have three Texas Governors awards (one of these was awarded to our founder), 2001 Champion Educator in adult literacy, awarded to our founder, a Verizon sponsored award, 2003 House Bill 28 became a law giving inmates the right to tutor during incarceration, and 2005 national recognition from the Crime Prevention Council in Washington, D. C. In 2012, we assumed leadership of a pod of females at the Dallas County Jail, a first in this environment. Considering all the challenges that we have had in starting a brand-new concept, having to work with space availability on different units, staff opposition, unstable and unstructured inmates with a myriad of behaviors, mental health issues, severe trauma from abuse and sexual abuse, addictions, constantly having to guide inmates to not cross the authority line between their leadership positions and exercising authority over one another, we probably are on target time-wise with expansion; not to mention the fact that many officers have the same issues and behaviors as the inmates, we are probably on target with expansion.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Texas

No one truly knows a nation until one has been inside its jails. A nation should not be judged by how it treats its highest citizens, but its lowest ones. In 1997, a peer-driven literacy program began within theTexas prisons in to eradicate functional illiteracy and provide redemptive reintegration of this disadvantaged population.

Since prisons are built on reading failure of 4th graders and nearly 75% of inmates are either functionally illiterate or completely illiterate (19%) www.invisible children.org, it is no wonder that they face huge challenges to staying out of prison post-release. Many have undiagnosed lear

Social Media

Blog

External Reviews

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Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Texas Hope Literacy Inc

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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CEO

Ms. Lucy H. Smith

BIO

Lucy Smith is a Licensed Dyslexia Therapist under the Texas Department of State Health Services, #1206. She earned a Masters in Education with a Concentration in Learning Therapy from Southern Methodist University in 2005. She also is a Certified Academic Language Therapist, Qualified Instructor, Dyslexia Teacher Trainer.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ms. Lucy H Smith

Texas HOPE Literacy, Inc.

Term: Dec 2011 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?