Human Services

Project Hope Alliance

  • Costa Mesa, CA
  • www.projecthopealliance.org

Mission Statement

Project Hope Alliance is committed to ending the cycle of homelessness, one child at a time. We aren't just giving homeless children hope, we are giving them a basis for hope, through education, housing and by demonstrating in a real way that their futures are not limited by their parents' economic circumstances.

Main Programs

  1. Education
  2. Family Stability Program
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Orange County has more homeless children per capita than LA or San Diego Counties. To meet this tremendous need, Project Hope Alliance serves children throughout Orange County.

ruling year

2003

CEO since 2013

Self-reported

Jennifer Friend

Keywords

Self-reported

Education, homelessness, youth, housing, assistance, project hope, project hope school, project hope alliance, family stability, motel, homeless, children, rapid rehousing, rehousing, blended learning, STEAM, STEM, school, motel kids, motel

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Also Known As

Project Hope Alliance

EIN

75-3099628

 Number

3270834626

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Student Services and Organizations (B80)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

In 2014 we ended homelessness for 151 kids representing 59 families. Since the launch of our Family Stability Program (in 2012), our organization has ended homelessness for 319 children or 129 families--more than 60% of the way towards our goal of ending homelessness for 500 children in Orange County! Project Hope Alliance doesn't stop there. By following each child through high school graduation, our community is not only ending the instance of homelessness through housing, but also ending the cycle of homelessness through education.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Education

Homeless children have to defy unique odds in order to meet the standards of the classroom. The education program at Project Hope Alliance is committed to helping these students overcome the obstacles posing threat to their academic success. Focused on creating a positive learning experience, our programs seek to close the significant performance gaps separating homeless children from their housed peers. We hope to re-instill the value of education through improved student attendance and preparedness as well as enhanced confidence in the classroom. Throughout the last 25 years, this program has served thousands of children in the Orange County area. Our strategy is proven effective and is currently at work in 21 cities, 39 different schools, and in the lives of over 300 children.

Category

Education, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Homeless

Other Named Groups

Budget

$450,000.00

Program 2

Family Stability Program

Educational success is only a part of the solution. Project Hope Alliance has launched a related program to support families in obtaining secure and consistent housing. Our staff works to build a collaborative relationship with parents helping them to meet the immediate needs of their families while continually pursuing financial independence. Since the creation of this program, over 100 families representing more than 300 children have been moved out of homelessness and into long-term housing. With an impressive success rate (more than 83%), housing stability efforts have victoriously confronted the most basic issue of homelessness; providing a home.

Category

Housing, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Other Named Groups

Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)

Homeless

Budget

$450,000.00

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Hours children spent on learning curriculum

Target Population
Children and youth (0-19 years)

Connected to a Program?
Education
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Each child in the Bright Start and Soaring to Success Education Programs receive a laptop with Internet access and the Waterford Early Learning Program.

2. Number of mentoring sessions with children

Target Population
Children and youth (0-19 years)

Connected to a Program?
Education
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Youth in all Education Programming are paired with a supportive volunteer mentor or staff Promotore (for the Promotor Pathway Program), who act as a mentor, coach and motivator.

3. Number of individuals served

Target Population
Families

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
PHA rapidly rehouses (HUD best practice) homeless families and provides intensive educational supports for the children to ensure their future self-reliance.

4. Percent of children showing improved academic progress

Target Population
Children and youth (0-19 years)

Connected to a Program?
Education
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Children in the Bright Start Program advanced 3/4 of a school year in english and almost a full school year in math and science.

5. Percent of parents who affirm that the Education Programs contributed to academic gains and socio-emotional growth for their child(ren).

Target Population
Children and youth (0-19 years)

Connected to a Program?
Education
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Metric is for Bright Start Program

6. Percent of families moved out of homelessness and have maintained permanent, independent housing for at least six months

Target Population
Families

Connected to a Program?
Family Stability Program
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

7. Percent of families that maintain economic self-sufficiency, either through the maintenance of current income level and/or increased income level over the course of a year's time

Target Population
Families

Connected to a Program?
Family Stability Program
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

8. Hours of mentoring

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years)

Connected to a Program?
Education
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
A caring adult is critical to a youth's ability to succeed, the Promotor Pathway Program focuses on cultivating and maintaining a lasting, trusting relationships with the youth served.

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    For more than 25 years, Project Hope Alliance has been ending the cycle of homelessness, one child at a time. With you, we can end homelessness today and prevent homelessness tomorrow.…Our team is ending homelessness today by rapidly rehousing working-poor families and guiding them into financial independence and self-sufficiency.… Our team is ending homelessness tomorrow by providing homeless children with the tools and opportunities they need to achieve an exceptional education and a brighter future.With more than 30,000 homeless children attending Orange County schools, your support is more crucial than ever.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Project Hope Alliance supports homeless students and their families, meeting the unique academic and psychosocial needs of these children. Project Hope Alliance take a two-generational approach to ending homelessness: The organization ends homelessness today through innovative rapid rehousing programs--providing stable housing and financial independence to homeless families; Their team is ending homelessness tomorrow with one-of-a-kind academic empowerment programs uniquely tailored to the needs (and strengths) of homeless children.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    This year, Project Hope Alliance stands more poised than ever to accomplish its mission of ending homelessness, one child at a time. In recent months, we have increased our capacity by making additions to staff and programming. Along with an additional 3 full time case managers, we have welcomed a new Director of Programs, Nicole Delaney. Coming to us from Teach for America, Ms. Delaney brings with her a wealth of knowledge regarding strategies and procedures for giving the children we serve access to an exception education. In Fall 2015, Project Hope Alliance will be launching several new initiatives and programs that will allow us to reach more students throughout Orange County. These programs include:

    1. BRIGHT START: For children experiencing homelessness, continuity in classroom instruction tends to be a great challenge, as their home life experience does not always afford them the opportunity to continue in the same learning environment/ classroom for an entire school year. This program will bring each child a structured, assessment- and researched-based learning experience; the love, mentorship, and support of a caring volunteer; and will serve to empower their parents with skills and strategies to best meet the needs of these early learners. This program specifically focuses on children who require additional assistance in reading, math and science. The primary objective is improvement in the area of literacy through the subject areas. Each child receives a personalized laptop with the Waterford Early Learning Program installed (which addresses reading, math and science), as well as wireless Internet access and take home materials. The student completes 30-minute sessions, five times per week. Parents (and any interested classroom teachers) will receive an overview of the program, motivational tips and strategies specifically intended for young learners, Internet safety information, and guidance on data interpretation and programmatic features.

    2. Project Hope Alliance will soon be launching an additional program for high school students. Assigned Case Managers will act as youth development workers, mentors, and intensive case managers and will work intentionally and deliberately to build transforming relationships with disconnected youth. The Case Manager is responsible for providing services and referrals, support and follow-up over an extended period of time to a high-risk youth population between the ages of 14-24. The Case Manager will provide mentoring, skill development, guidance, and advocacy so that each youth achieves the goals of increased academic success, transition to work, and improvement in healthy behaviors. This position will be placed inside an Orange County High School and the Case manager will work collaboratively with the school site staff.

    Thanks to our increased capacity, we are also on schedule to end homelessness for over 200 children through our Family Stability Program.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Family Stability Program: Services provided through our programs are documented and outcomes tracked through the county-wide Homeless Management Information System, (HMIS). Our case managers monitor the progress of program participants during monthly meetings, & are documented in case management reports. Case managers utilize Sales Force software system (deemed the number one in CRM and Analytics), allowing measurement and program efficacy insight from intake to services to outcome.

    Education Program: Direct measures of progress begin with our MSW PPSC Case Managers that meet and guide our families, and work in partnership with the Orange County Department of Education in three meaningful categories: 1) Teachers 2) Principles 3) McKinney-Vento Homeless Liaisons. Our statistical Education outcomes are tracked through the county-wide Homeless Management Information System and our Sales Force Outcome Tracker that tracks and reports children's school attendance, academic progress & emotional health.

    In the aim to end generational homelessness we have partnered with researchers at UC Irvine to design a one-of-a kind assessment that tracks academic and quality-of-life markers of Orange County homeless students, with hopes to glean insight as to why some excel while others fail.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Evidence procured from the aforementioned measurements shows that in 2014 we ended homelessness for 59 families (including 152 children). A total of 86.6% of our families achieved financial stability within 12 months.
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Orange County has more homeless children per capita than LA or San Diego Counties. To meet this tremendous need, Project Hope Alliance serves children throughout Orange County.

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

Tutors... Over 25 years of service, PHA has observed the impact of homelessness on academic performance first-hand. Even after a child is moved from homelessness and into stable housing, they are often still behind in school with limited resources to get caught up. As we aim to match every child with a tutor, we are always in need of more individuals who can commit one hour per week to tutoring a child we serve. Your service gives the children an opportunity to get caught up and regain academic confidence. Donations... Our family stability program seeks to end homelessness for working poor families in Orange County by assisting with budgeting, job placement, and advocacy. Today, the cost of ending homelessness is less than $1,200 per child! Every donation, no matter the size, brings us closer to moving another child out of homelessness and into stability.

Accreditations

Affiliations + Memberships

United Way Member Agency

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

PROJECT HOPE ALLIANCE
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Project Hope Alliance

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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CEO

Jennifer Friend

BIO

Prior to becoming the CEO of Project Hope Alliance, Jennifer Friend enjoyed a successful career as a partner at a large law firm managing a litigation team and a substantial personal book of business representing national and international clients throughout the civil courts of California. While practicing law, Ms. Friend served as the President and Secretary of the Project Hope Alliance Board of Directors and was actively engaged in the organization's expansion and strategic growth. In this capacity, she also shared with the community her personal story of growing up in Orange County and experiencing significant financial struggles which found her family of six forced from their home at various times during her childhood and living in different motels in Orange County. Ultimately, Jennifer found her calling in advocating for and advancing the needs of homeless children in Orange County and elected to resign from her partnership and make her avocation of making sure that every child in Orange County has a fair chance to realize and fulfill their potential, her vocation.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Lynn Hemans

Taco Bell

Term: Sept 2010 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?