Religion, Spiritual Development

ServLife International, Inc.

  • Indianapolis, IN
  • http://www.servlife.org

Mission Statement

ServLife International propels reconciliation and justice by building global community to plant churches, care for children and fight poverty.

Main Programs

  1. Planting churches
  2. Caring for children
  3. Fighting poverty

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

Areas Served Narrative

ServLife operates primarily in North India and Nepal.

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1993

Executive Director since 2012

Mr. Adam Nevins

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

Christian, Missions, Indigenous church, Relief & Development, Children, Pastor, Training, Equipping, Micro-Finance, Micro-Loan

Self-reported by organization

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2013.
Register now

EIN

76-0363452

 Number

1872602843

Physical Address

1000 W. 42nd Street Rm 132

Indianapolis, IN 46208

Also Known As

ServLife

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Protestant (X21)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Religious Leadership, Youth Development (O55)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

We are currently operating in India and Nepal and actively support 300 children, 170 pastors and their families, and assist an additional 30 impoverished families to create sources of sustainable income through micro-finance.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Planting churches

The local church is the incarnation of God’s love for the world. ServLife works with these local churches to raise up leaders to bless, serve and multiply the church. Leaders are equipped through our church planting training school and ongoing conferences.

Empowerment: The main agent of change in our world today is God working through the local church. We partner with these churches to share the love of Jesus. We operate our own church planting initiatives as well as serving other church groups.

Equipping: Many local pastors in regions where we work have no formal education or Bible training. To help these leaders become more effective in sharing Christ’s love with their people, ServLife helps equip them with learning venues ranging from a one year missionary/leadership training school in India to partnerships with other training schools and organizations that help train local church leaders.

Multiplication: We believe God intends for His church to multiply. With this in mind, ServLife provides financial support to church planters who are trained within one of our training schools. We commit to guide these workers for at least five years with the objective of church growth that will someday support them.

Category

Religion

Budget

Population Served

None

Program 2

Caring for children

We believe in helping rescue and rebuild the lives of children who have experienced abuse, neglect and injustice. Through our homes for children and schools, they live in a community environment where they are offered education, clothing, food and love.

ServLife currently operates six children’s homes throughout Nepal and Northern India. The children who come to these homes are both full-orphan (both parents are deceased) and half-orphan (only one parent has died). Sadly, nearly all of their stories are all replete with conditions of neglect, trauma and abuse that they have experienced.

These children live in a community environment where they are offered education, clothing, food and love. Knowing the limited options for them, we believe the homes in Nepal and India have rescued many from child labor, life on the street and the sex trade that is rife in the region.

Category

Education

Budget

Population Served

None

Program 3

Fighting poverty

The HOPE Fund is our micro-finance initiative for those who suffer from hunger and extreme poverty. This fund provides a small loan to help empower those in extreme poverty to start a new business. We work with local churches and appointed boards to identify applicants to receive the loans and manage the repayment.

The vicious cycle of hunger and poverty can be broken with just a small loan offered to help start a new business. Whether it’s five pigs, twenty chickens, a gas motor, fishing nets, or a sewing machine, billions on our planet cannot access loans for small business start up costs. The cost for an average loan from the ServLife HOPE Fund ranges in amounts from $100 to $1,000 depending on the nature of the business start-up.

Here’s how it works:

* Loans vary based on individual needs
* The potential borrower must go through an approval process with a locally appointed board
* Loans must be for a revenue-generating project
* All loans must be paid back in full in order for a future loan to be given to the recipient (unless other arrangements have been made)
* ServLife staff will meet with borrowers regularly to assist with business development and planning, as well as to do evaluation and assessment.
* Repaid loan funds will return to the fund to create a revolving loan program to help other people in the community

Category

Human Services

Budget

Population Served

None

Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

Self-reported by organization

1. Number of donors retained

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
2015 donor retention rate was 66%. Not counting 2014 new donors (which include a lot of donors funding their friend's mission trip), the retention rate jumps to 82%.

2. Number of new donors

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
The main bump in new donor activity in 2015 was from Nepal Earthquake Relief donors.

3. Number of clients served

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
This is the number of pastors, children and micro-finance families in the programs. It does not include church attenders for individual family members in the micro-finance program.

4. Number of overall donors

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Both the number of donors and the amount of revenue have doubled from 2012 to 2015.

5. Average number of dollars received per donor

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Despite doubling our donor base in 4 years, average giving per donor has continued to slowly climb.

6. Number of students enrolled

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
This is the number of children in the education sponsorship program.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Self-reported by organization

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    VISION AND MISSION
    ServLife International envisions the Gospel bringing spiritual and physical restoration and healing in the most marginalized regions in the world. Our mission is to propel reconciliation and justice by building global community to plant churches, care for children and fight poverty.

    TARGET
    Our current operations focus in North India and Nepal. Special focus is given to impoverished regions and villages. Future countries of focus will be adjacent to existing countries of work and remain within the 10/40 window.

    FIVE YEAR GOALS
    1. PLANT CHURCHES
    a. Empower and equip 150 new pastors and plant as many churches in India and Nepal.
    b. Provide ongoing training and equipping for 500 pastors and lay leaders.

    2. CARE FOR CHILDREN
    a. Stabilize funding for the current 300 children (and 5 orphanages) in our programs to continue to receive food, shelter, care and education.
    b. Finalize funding for the two new orphanages and complete construction.
    c. Launch our first ServLife school in West Nepal.
    d. Add 200 new children to our programs to total 500 children.

    3. FIGHT POVERTY
    a. Provide support and oversight for the existing 30 micro-loans and ensure that they are paid off on time.
    b. Ensure that all paid off loans are renewed with new recipients.
    c. Raise funds and launch the micro-finance program in 5 new villages.
    d. Launch 100 new micro-loans ($300-800 typically).
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    FIVE YEAR STRATEGIES
    1. PLANT CHURCHES
    a. Our training center in India and our training center in Nepal will work together to train 25-30 pastors each year. This training rate has been sustained for the last 5 years and should prove conservative moving forward.
    b. At our annual conference, all trained leaders are invited to come together for 3-4 days of extended training and equipping. This training is led by leaders in India, Nepal and the USA, and provides practical training as well as inspirational encouragement.

    2. CARE FOR CHILDREN
    a. Funding for this program has been low the last 3 years but picked up in 2013. 160 of the 300 children are sponsored, with over 50 new sponsorships in 2013. A local church has also agreed to provide all the funding needed for a new orphanage in Nepal. Our newly launched online child sponsorship module (https://servlife.org/sponsorachild/) has helped to increase support.
    b. Two churches in the USA have agreed to provide the necessary funding for both of the new orphanages.
    c. Our Nepal Children's Director is working in a local community to launch our first independent school.
    d. Through events, advocate home events and online marketing we should easily sponsor 50 new children each year.

    3. FIGHT POVERTY
    a. New hires to oversee the micro-finance program should ensure timely loan payments and accurate field reporting.
    b. New staff will oversee that loans are paid off and renewed to new recipients.
    c. Existing and new partnerships in the USA will provide funding for launching the micro-finance program in 5 new villages in 5 years, raising $5,000 - $10,000 per village for launch.
    d. These new villages will be able to start with 8-12 loans each. After 2-3 years, as loans are paid off, new loans will be given in the same villages.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    RESOURCES
    1. FINANCIAL: Our funding in the last 3 years shows growth and positive trends. Our donor retention rate has gone from 35% to 50% to 75% in the last 3 years respectively. Our large donors over $10,000 increased from 10 in 2012 to 14 in 2013. We added 89 new donors in 2012 and 206 new donors in 2013. Our donations in 2012 totaled $489,000, and in 2013 totaled $659,000. These trends along with minimal budget increases should ensure our ability to grow and support all existing and future programs.
    2. ADVISORS: Our advisors have provided a wealth of knowledge and guidance for our small staff. Their advice on fundraising, legal matters, finances, networking and marketing has allowed our small staff (only one full-time and 3 part-time as of Jan 2014) to have exponential and focused impact.
    3. ADVOCATES: Our donors that have converted to advocates have galvanized existing and new donors around our goals and objectives. Through trips, events and meetings they have propelled our cause and increased awareness.

    CAPACITIES
    1. GENERAL: While this has been a significant challenge in the last 3+ years, we are actively prioritizing and addressing it.
    2. INTERNATIONAL: Our three international directors have had very lean staffing, with most of them only having 1-2 full time staff support in the headquarters office. In 2013 we added 2 more full time office staffers, and intend to increase this more in the years to come.
    3. USA: As of January 2014, our total USA staff was one full-time Executive Director and three part-time staff. In the next 1-2 years we plan to add a Co-Director to assist with development and donor relations, and a Communications Director to oversee media and communications. This will allow the Executive Director to shift more focus to international oversight, while still maintaining key donor relationships and casting vision for the organization.

    CONNECTIONS
    1. PHILANTHROPISTS: In the last year our Executive Director has been mentored by 3 of the top 4 philanthropists in the Indianapolis area. They are contributing time, wisdom and funding, but also connecting us to other donors, organizations and advisors.
    2. DEVELOPMENT: Our development consultant has introduced us to organizations, development education programs and even donors. One of our donors is also a successful development director at a large organization, and volunteers with us to provide insight, call donors and connect us to potential donors.
    3. BOARD: We are planning to double the size of our board in 2014, with 2 confirmed for January and 2 more planning to join in the second quarter. These new board members bring new connections and potential donors to our organization. We have already begun to plan new potential donor meetings arranged by these new (and existing) board members.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    FINANCIAL AND RELATIONAL
    1. TRACKING REPORTS: Monthly, Quarterly and Annually we track funds raised, funds spent, number of gifts, average gift amount, new donors, recovered donors, new child sponsorships, new pastor sponsorships, new micro-loans, grants applied for, foundations added, new cultivations, new USA churches added (donors), and donors that have moved from one (of four) tier to a higher tier.
    2. BOARD: Our board meets 5 times a year and looks over these tracking reports and strategizes and brainstorms next steps for improvement.

    FIELD WORK
    1. OVERSIGHT: Each of our international directors provides a monthly report with field stories, program changes, constituent changes and additional information. Our Executive Director stays in weekly (sometimes daily) contact, and meets with them face to face 2-4 times per year. Program growth is tracked and regularly discussed. Every January the international directors are provided with an annual review to cover areas of success and weakness.
    2. PROGRAMS: Each of our programs are tracked regularly. To meet our 5 year goals, these indicators will show that we are on track:
    a. 20-30 pastors trained each year and as many churches planted each year.
    b. 50 new children added to our program each year.
    c. 10-20 new micro-loans launched each year. As they are paid off (2-3 years), new loans will be issued.

    ORGANIZATIONAL HEALTH
    If all of these indicators are on track but our organizational health is deteriorating, then it will likely be impossible to attain our goals, much less survive as an organization. Per Patrick Lencioni's book, The Advantage, our Board and Executive Director will track our health in four key areas:
    1. A cohesive leadership team. Build trust, eliminate politics and increase efficiency.
    2. Creating clarity. Minimize the potential for confusion.
    3. Over-communicate clarity. Align employees around organizational clarity by communicating key messages through repetition, simplicity, multiple mediums and cascading messages.
    4. Reinforce clarity. Ensure consistency in our hiring, managing performance, rewards and recognition and employee dismissal.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    1. PLANT CHURCHES
    a. 25 pastors were trained in 2013, and 25 churches were planted.
    b. Over 150 pastors and many of their wives attended our 2013 Pastors' Conference.

    2. CARE FOR CHILDREN
    a. 50 children received new sponsorship in 2013, and funding for the orphanages and programs increased in 2013.
    b. 80% of the funding for the India orphanages has been received. Funding for the new Nepal orphanage has been committed and is expected to be received in April 2014.
    c. Our Nepal Children's Director is finalizing plans for the new children's school in West Nepal.
    d. 100 children have been added to our orphanages and programs in the last two years.

    3. FIGHT POVERTY
    a. As of January 2014, our new HOPE Fund Director is providing support and oversight for the existing 30 micro-loans and ensuring that they are paid off on time.
    b. This new director is also ensuring that all paid off loans are renewed with new recipients.
    c. In 2013 we raised funds for a new micro-finance village that was launched in January 2014.
    d. We have averaged over $5,000 per year raised for micro-finance, allowing us to start 8-12 new loans per year). As loans have been paid off (2-3 years), new loans have been offered.

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

Areas Served Narrative

ServLife operates primarily in North India and Nepal.

Self-reported by organization

Blog

The organization's Blog

Social Media

@servlife

@servlife

@114319887773126077091

@servlife-international-inc-?trk=biz-companies-cym

@servlife3

@servlife

@servlife

Videos

photos


External Reviews

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits
Source: greatnonprofits.org

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

SERVLIFE INTERNATIONAL INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

ServLife International, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Executive Director

Mr. Adam Nevins

BIO

Adam Nevins is the Executive Director of ServLife International, based in Indianapolis and working in India and Nepal to plant churches, care for children and fight poverty. A volunteer since 2003 and employee since 2012, Adam has a passion for seeing Jesus minister to the spiritual and physical needs of humanity.

A graduate of Taylor University, Adam has a Bachelor's Degree in Mass Communications with a Music Minor. With strengths in both the creative and administrative realms, Adam's mission of conveying hope in the midst of hopelessness has found expression as a worship pastor, nonprofit founder, singer/songwriter and project manager.

Adam and his wife Christin have been married for 17 years and are blessed with three children: Carolyn, Emily and David. They had the joy of adopting their son from India in 2006, and the entire family visited India and Nepal with ServLife in 2013.

In his first four years at ServLife as Executive Director, Adam led the charge to double programs, revenue, staff, and donors. His drive for excellence and organizational health continues to propel the organization forward to new levels of effectiveness and efficiency.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Rex Fisher

No Affiliation

Term: Dec 2015 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?