Human Services

Colorado Parent and Child Foundation

  • Denver, CO
  • www.cpcfonline.org

Mission Statement

The Colorado Parent & Child Foundation promotes and supports high-quality early childhood programs and family initiatives which inspire parent involvement and facilitate school readiness.

Main Programs

  1. Program 1
  2. Colorado HIPPY
  3. Colorado Parents as Teachers
Service Areas

Self-reported

Colorado

State of Colorado

ruling year

1991

Executive Director since 2015

Self-reported

Ms. Heather Tritten

Keywords

Self-reported

HIPPY, PAT, Parents as Teachers, CPCF, home visit

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EIN

84-1169805

 Number

4396078010

Physical Address

800 Grant Street Suite 200

Denver, CO 80203

Also Known As

Colorado Parent and Child Foundation

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Family Services (P40)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Parents are their child's first teachers, and the home is a child's most influential early learning environment. Working in partnership with a network of programs across the state, the Colorado Parent & Child Foundation makes it possible for parents to receive the knowledge, tools, and support they need to facilitate their child’s school readiness. We provide advocacy, leadership and guidance to programs that are evidence-based and proven to positively impact Colorado's most vulnerable children and their families. Our programs currently reach 3,500 vulnerable families of young children, prenatal through age five.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

The Colorado Parent and Child Foundation achieves its vision that parents prepare their children for success in school and life through its work with two evidence-based early childhood home visitation models: HIPPY and PAT. HIPPY (Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters) is a home-based, peer-delivered, early intervention program that helps parents provide educational enrichment for their preschool aged children in order to help them realize success by beginning school ready to learn. Trained home visitors, themselves current or former parents in the program, provide weekly home visits to parents of preschool aged children (3, 4, and 5) over the course of 30 weeks each year. The program is targeted toward low-income families with limited educational attainment and is offered in both English and Spanish. The goal of the program is to empower parents as the primary educators of their children by giving them the tools, skills, and confidence they need to work with their children on a daily basis in the home. This is done through role play of a weekly curriculum, providing parents with activities to do with their children on a daily basis to promote language development, achievement of developmental milestones, parental attachment, strong home/school ties, and parent involvement. Colorado HIPPY also works to ensure that 100% of children are fully immunized. Currently, the program in Colorado reaches over 700 families in 8 Colorado Counties (Adams, Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, Denver, Jefferson, Rio Grande, and Saguache). CPCF works with 6 partner agencies to implement the direct programming. PAT (Parents as Teachers) is a parent education and family support program serving families throughout pregnancy until their child enters kindergarten, usually age 5. Highly trained and certified parent educators make monthly home visits to families (with higher frequency based on family need) beginning prenatally through age five. Home visits are designed to help parents understand what to expect in each stage of their child?s development and offer practical tips on ways to encourage learning, manage challenging behavior, promote strong parent-child relationships, and access community resources. Health and developmental screening is included in the program model. The goals of the program are to help children develop optimally during the crucial early years of life, building on readiness skills so that children enter school more able to succeed, and supporting parents as their child?s first and most influential teacher. Currently, the program in Colorado reaches over 2300 families in 34 Colorado Counties (Adams, Alamosa, Arapahoe, Bent, Boulder, Broomfield, Conejos, Costilla, Crowley, Custer, Delta, Denver, Douglas, El Paso, Fremont, Garfield, Gunnison, Jefferson, Lake, La Plata, Larimer, Montezuma, Montrose, Morgan, Otero, Ouray, Park, Pueblo, Rio Grande, Routt, Saguache, San Miguel, Summit, and Weld. CPCF works with 33 partner agencies to implement the direct programming.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Program 2

Colorado HIPPY

Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) is an evidence-based parent involvement, school readiness program that helps parents prepare their three, four, and five year old children for success in school and beyond. The program empowers parents as the primary educators of their children in the home and fosters parent involvement in school and community life to maximize the chances of successful early school experiences. HIPPY is a peer-delivered model wherein trained home visitors provide weekly home visits, working one-on-one with parents of preschool aged children (age 3, 4, and 5). The Age 5 curriculum follows the child through the kindergarten year, thus reinforcing learning through a very intentional home-school connection. In addition to weekly home visits, the program provides monthly group meetings.  Last year, HIPPY reached 898 children and their families through 6 programs in 8 counties, including: Adams, Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, Denver, Jefferson, Rio Grande, and Saguache.  HIPPY families received 19,701 home visits, and home visitors spent 24,626 hours mentoring parents. The program offer 112 group meetings for families, distributed over 9,139 books, and ensured that 100% of HIPPY children had up-to-date immunizations.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Infants/Babies (under age 5)

Budget

$659,590.00

Program 3

Colorado Parents as Teachers

Parents as Teachers (PAT) is an evidence-based parent education and family support program serving families throughout pregnancy until their child enters kindergarten. The program increases parent knowledge of early childhood development and improves parenting practices; provides early detection of developmental delays and health issues; prevents child abuse and neglect; and increases children’s school readiness and school success. The PAT model includes 4 components: personal visits during which certified parent educators share age-appropriate child development information with parents and engage the family in activities that provide meaningful parent/child interaction; monthly group meetings designed to relay important information about child development and offer parents opportunities to interact and support one another; health and developmental screening; and a resource network to connect families with resources that meet their specific needs. Currently, PAT reaches 2,689 children and their families through 34 programs in 35 counties, including: Adams, Alamosa, Arapahoe, Bent, Boulder, Broomfield, Chaffee, Conejos, Costilla, Crowley, Custer, Delta, Denver, Douglas, El Paso, Fremont, Garfield, Gunnison, Jefferson, La Plata, Larimer, Montezuma, Montrose, Morgan, Otero, Ouray, Park, Pueblo, Rio Grande, Routt, Saguache, San Miguel, Summit, Teller and Weld. PAT families generally  receive monthly home visits, though higher risk families receive visits every two weeks. Last year, the programs offered over 1,500 group meetings for families, 1,708 children received health and developmental screenings. Of those screened, 12% were identified with possible health and developmental problems and were referred for follow-up services, and  90% of PAT two-year olds had up-to-date immunizations.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Infants/Babies (under age 5)

Budget

$532,997.00

Service Areas

Self-reported

Colorado

State of Colorado

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Colorado Parent and Child Foundation
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Colorado Parent and Child Foundation

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Executive Director

Ms. Heather Tritten

BIO

Heather Tritten joined CPCF as the Executive Director in January of 2015. Heather is responsible for providing overall leadership of the organization and its programs, ensuring consistent achievement of the organization’s mission, implementation of its policies, goals and objectives, and management of its programmatic, financial, and administrative position. Prior to CPCF Heather served as the Vice President of Quality Programs at Qualistar Colorado where she was responsible for the quality improvement and assessment efforts of the organization. Heather came to Qualistar Colorado from the Office of Lt. Governor Joe Garcia where she served as Head Start State Collaboration Director and worked to build early childhood systems that align with Head Start efforts. Heather authored Governor Hickenlooper’s early literacy plan, Colorado Reads: the Early Literacy Initiative, provided leadership in the development of Colorado’s Race to the Top: Early Learning Challenge proposal, and coordinated efforts around improving early childhood program quality and increasing professional development opportunities. Before moving to Colorado, Heather was the Executive Director of Community Action Partnership of Utah where she focused on finding long-term solutions to the problems of poverty. Heather completed a Buell Early Childhood Leadership Fellowship this past year. She holds a B.S. in Sociology from Grand Valley State University and is an M.A. in Administration, Leadership and Policy Studies at the University of Colorado Denver.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Tara Rojas

IMA Financial Group

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


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BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?