Youth Development

Denver Urban Scholars

  • Denver, CO
  • www.denverurbanscholars.org

Mission Statement

Denver Urban Scholars facilitates academic achievement and positive social development among underserved urban youth, empowering them to fully engage in and contribute to our community. We ensure the success of youth through a holistic approach that addresses complex needs by coordinating teams of student, family, mentor and school.

Main Programs

  1. Milestones
  2. Stepping Stones Middle School Program
  3. Capstones College Program
Service Areas

Self-reported

Colorado

Of our 129 total students currently served, 88% (113) live in Denver, 6% (8) Jefferson, 4% (5) Arapahoe and 2% (3) Adams counties;

ruling year

1995

Principal Officer since 1995

Self-reported

Patrick Byrne

Keywords

Self-reported

mentoring, disadvantaged youth, high school graduation, education, dropout prevention

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EIN

84-1280659

Physical Address

3532 Franklin St., Suite T

Denver, 80205

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Adult, Child Matching Programs (O30)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Adult, Child Matching Programs (O30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Results during 2011-2012: 88% (23 of 26) of seniors graduated; 95% (23 of 24) of graduates are enrolled in college this fall (one student is joining the Air Force); 94% (113 of 120) of students completed the school year in the program; 90% (108 of 120) of students advanced to the next grade level on time; 46% (55 of 120) missed less than 10 days of school; 55% (66 of 120) maintained 90% attendance or better.
During 2012-13, we hope to reach 200 youth served. Our current objectives are:
--Objective: By June 2013, 90% of DUS seniors will increase their eligibility for college and the workforce by graduating from quality high schools, as measured by school records; --Objective: By June 2013, 95% of all DUS middle and high school students will progress to the next grade level on time, as measured by school records; --Objective: By June 2013, 50% of all DUS middle and high school youth will maintain a 90% or better school attendance rate, as measured by school records. --Objective: By June 2013, 90% of program participants will demonstrate satisfaction with the mentoring relationship, as measured by youth/mentor bonding survey. --Objective: By June 2013, 95% of high school graduates will be enrolled in institutions of higher learning (5% will progress to workforce or advanced training), as measured by case manager records; --Objective: By June 2013, 80% of 2012 high school graduates will increase educational achievement through completion of college credits, as measured by college grade/course completion reports.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Milestones

Our Milestones High School Program follows our
unique model in which at-risk youth who are identified through our school partners come under the care of a clinical case manager.
Clinical case management is a specialized professional field in which case
managers go beyond simply coordinating needed services; they evaluate and
address all aspects of their students’ physical and social environments as well
as collaborate with families, teachers and other service providers.

Case managers
match each youth with a one-to-one mentor after performing quality screening
and matching (we screen mentors using the most thorough background
checks through state and federal criminal and sex offender registries, driving
history and fingerprinting). Case
managers supervise the mentoring relationship, monitor student progress at
school and meet with families and teachers to address any needs students have.
We provide clinical case management and mentoring services year-round.

Mentors attend four hours of required orientation and
training per year; they have phone contact with their students at least once
per week and meet with them in person at least twice per month. Students also
meet with their case managers at least twice per month. We hold monthly group
mentoring activities of up to six hours to promote bonding between youth and
mentors.

Our strong partnerships with public charter schools allows
us to have a presence in the schools our youth attend through dedicated office
space or access to space in which case managers can meet with their students. Students
with a 2.5 GPA or lower have access to weekly (one-hour) tutoring services as
needed at their school or our offices. We
connect youth to other services such as learning disability testing and
counseling and provide stipends to cover academic expenses. Six clinical
(master’s-level) case managers have caseloads of between 16 and 25 each; we
also have two college (social work) interns who provide supplemental case management
during the academic year.

Our evidence-based program strategies include working with
smaller schools, which provides protective factors by fostering positive social
and academic settings13 and a greater sense of belonging.14
Our development of strong partnerships with public charter schools provides
youth with easy access to our program at their schools and helps us reach youth
who are most in need of support services within a promising learning
environment. Local studies show that programs promoting school bonding, clear rules
for behavior and mentoring are most needed in Colorado to protect against
multiple types of violence,15 drug use, truancy and academic
failure.16 Our
program is preventing dropout through adult advocates, parental involvement,
tutoring, life skills training and middle school intervention.17

(Sources cited available upon request)

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$456,391.00

Program 2

Stepping Stones Middle School Program

Our Stepping Stones Middle School Program also follows our unique clinical case management model and delivers programming that specifically addresses the needs of middle school youth living in disadvantaged circumstances.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Budget

$153,141.00

Program 3

Capstones College Program

We launched our Capstones College Program as a pilot program in 2012 and are serving 30 youth currently who have graduated from high school through our program. We continue to design the program to meet the unique needs of youth transitioning from high school to college and striving to succeed through at least their first two years of college.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Young Adults (20-25 years) -- currently not in use

Budget

$47,117.00

Service Areas

Self-reported

Colorado

Of our 129 total students currently served, 88% (113) live in Denver, 6% (8) Jefferson, 4% (5) Arapahoe and 2% (3) Adams counties;

Social Media

Funding Needs

Denver Urban Scholars is in need of funding to provide our elevated support services to a growing number of disadvantaged and underserved youth. Donated funds are applied to direct program services expenses (our founder covers all administrative and fundraising expenses each year) including program salaries for clinical case management, mentoring services, tutoring, academic stipends, bus passes for students to go to and from school, background checks on all volunteer mentors and college prep expenses. The economic downturn has increased our need for funding from additional donors in the community in order to maintain the high quality of services we provide to effectively address the complex needs of our youth.

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External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

DENVER URBAN SCHOLARS
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Denver Urban Scholars

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
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Principal Officer

Patrick Byrne

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

"The uniqueness of Denver Urban Scholars is that we partner with innovative schools that share our mission to help level the playing field for disadvantaged youth in both academic achievement and positive social development. Youth who become Urban Scholars have an opportunity to change the trajectory of their lives by engaging in school, in mentoring relationships and, really, breaking the barriers to their academic and social growth. Most of the youth who graduate through our program are the first in their families to do so."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Thomas May

Lockton Co.

Term: Feb 2013 - Jan 2015

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?