Arts, Culture, and Humanities

Adventures in Preservation

  • Boulder, CO
  • http://www.adventuresinpreservation.org

Mission Statement

Adventures in Preservation's mission is to connect people and preservation through enriching experiential programs that safeguard heritage and foster community sustainability. The driving force behind our work is a passion for saving the world's architectural heritage for integrated community use.

By supporting community-based preservation initiatives, AiP celebrates distinctive cultural identity as expressed through tradition historic architecture and demonstrates that historic buildings are vital to economic and environmental sustainability.

We have become a leader in offering volunteer vacations directed toward saving distinctive historic architecture. The fact that historic preservation is innately “green", keeping original materials in use and out of the landfill, provides yet another compelling reason for saving historic buildings for uses varying from affordable housing to community centers.

AiP uses skills training to promote the use of traditional building techniques to save and maintain architectural heritage. Participation in our projects provides community members and out-of-town volunteers with basic skills training and supports the creation of jobs in the field of historic building maintenance and restoration.

AiP envisions a world where people use, understand, and appreciate historic buildings that are vital to economic and environmental sustainability and preserve cultural identity.

Main Programs

  1. Saving a World Heritage Site - One Tower House at a Time
  2. Linking Archaeology with Preservation - Edge Hill Service Station & Fairfield Plantation
  3. Economic Development in Accra, Ghana - Creating a Culinary School and B&B
  4. Saving Kullas in Kosovo
  5. Conservation of Edwardian Greenhouse in Scotland

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Service Areas

Self-reported

International

Adventures in Preservation, to date, has received requests for assistance from 38 countries around the world. We have worked with 11 communities across the US and continue to develop new projects. Outside of the US, we have worked in Italy, Slovenia, Albania, Ecuador, Mexico, Armenia, Kenya and Ghana, and are currently developing a new project in Scotland. Our goal is to increase the support we received from individuals, corporations and foundations so that we are able to respond to a greater number of calls for help.

ruling year

2002

President since 2002

Self-reported

Ms. Judith Broeker

Secretary since 2002

Self-reported

Ms. Jamie Donahoe

Keywords

Self-reported

historic preservation, cultural heritage, building conservation, architecture, historic buildings, history, volunteer vacation, skills training, hands-on education

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Also Known As

AiP

EIN

84-1608047

Physical Address

1557 North Street

Boulder, CO 80304

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Other Art, Culture, Humanities Organizations/Services N.E.C. (A99)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

International Cultural Exchange (Q21)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Adventures in Preservation projects are designed to create a positive impact on each project community by saving valuable architectural heritage. Each historic building we select for repair and restoration must be used for an integrated community use, such as affordable housing or community center, and be important to the history of the community. Our building conservation projects support growth of sustainable local and regional economies.

Our projects -
1. Provide hands-on training & on-site experience in traditional building skills taught by experts in building conservation. The experience bolsters participant resumes, increases job opportunities, and opens new careers options, while we save a valuable piece of the community's built environment.
2. Keep building materials in use and out of the landfill, a very "green" practice.
3. Create an atmosphere of international understanding & cultural awareness.

Over the past 14 years, AiP has been instrumental in -
Initiating affordable housing projects by utilizing restored historic houses to provide safe & affordable housing units;
Supporting economic growth through heritage tourism by stabilizing and restoring UNESCO category 1 and 2 structures
Providing masonry restoration skills training for low-income interns to improve job skills & increase job opportunities;
Making community members aware of the value of their vernacular architecture in building their economy and reducing the cost of new materials.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Saving a World Heritage Site - One Tower House at a Time

AiP has been involved in conservation skills training & hands-on work in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Gjirokastra, Albania, since 2008. Gjirokastra is faced with a crisis of massive proportions: the continuing collapse of the town’s historic Ottoman-era tower houses. Loss of these massive tower houses is reducing the town’s ability to build a sustainable economy based on heritage tourism, the only viable path to economic growth.

Concerned citizens have been working together since 2000 to save their cultural heritage and need support and assistance from around the world to succeed. In 2008, AiP volunteers, at the request of the City of Gjirokastra, documented historic inscriptions found on many buildings that are being lost due to renovation, demolition or collapse. These inscriptions provide information on the community's varied beliefs and backgrounds.

In 2011, AiP initiated a project to repair and restore the UNESCO Category 1 Skenduli house. AiP provided some of the funding for Cultural Heritage without Borders (CHwB) to bring teams of Albanian architecture students, who completed conservation of exterior lime plaster and the main entrance gate. AiP volunteers also worked with CHwB on conservation of the Babameto house, beautifully restored for use as a much-needed tourist hostel in 2012.

In September 2014, AiP’s team of 12 professionals learned cutting edge techniques, including 3D laser scanning, while documenting decorative painting in preparation for conservation. During conservation, traditional techniques in wall painting will be taught, an art rapidly being lost.

The scanning team form Italy volunteered their services not only at the Skenduli house, but at the Kabili house at the request of city officials. This Category 1 monument is in danger of collapsing if emergency intervention is not quickly undertaken. AiP professional have donated their time and expertise to prepare a stabilization plan, and we are currently working to secure funds to cover the cost, which will total approximately $45,000. Tenants without the option for moving continue to live in the building. Our hope is to complete stabilization by November 2015.

The Kabili house stabilization is priority one, but the Skenduli house has not been forgotten. Funds are needed for completion of roof repair, much needed electrical updates, restoration of detailed woodwork, and more. Estimated cost of roof repairs, electrical update and decorative paint restoration is USD18,000. Total repair and restoration of this 3-story, 28 room stone residence is estimated at USD180,000.

Currently, the Skenduli is open to tourists, allowing them to see the great need for ongoing repair and maintenance. The Skendulis provide space at no cost for drawing classes provided to volunteers who attend hands-on preservation sessions. Once conservation is completed, the Skenduli house will be available for community classes and meetings.

Category

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

General Public/Unspecified

None

Budget

$180,000

Program 2

Linking Archaeology with Preservation - Edge Hill Service Station & Fairfield Plantation

AiP's partnership with The Fairfield Foundation began in 2011 with the transformation of the 1930's Edge Hill Texaco Station into the Center for Archaeology, Preservation and Education (C.A.P.E.), a community resource center. This was an outstanding demonstration of the value of adaptive reuse. AiP volunteers donated their time during two work sessions and, combined with donated materials, provided a value in completed work of approximately $30,000.

This partnership between the archaeologists of The Fairfield Foundation and the historic preservation specialists at AiP has created great interest among volunteers and community members.

Our current project at Fairfield Plantation, near Gloucester, Virginia, began in 2013 with a hugely successful session filled beyond the listed capacity with 12 enthusiastic volunteers. The Fairfield Plantation manor house was built in 1694 and destroyed by fire in 1897, leaving only a substantial brick foundation and rubble-filled cellar. Volunteers work to uncover and preserve the plantation’s story, which involves the lives of five generations of the Burwell family, as well as many enslaved Africans and African-Americans, forced to labor for the Burwell’s financial success.

The goals of this project are two-fold: to provide an outstanding educational experience for volunteers in both archaeology and preservation; and to enhance visitor experience at the Fairfield Plantation by making its history clear. With more tourists visiting the site, its ability to help support a sustainable local economy is enhanced.

Work in 2014 brought 11 volunteers and continued stabilization of manor house foundation walls and proceeded with the archaeological dig. This is a valuable project for Virginia's Middle Peninsula and is provided at very low cost to volunteers in order to encourage participation of students and members of the community. The budget is approximately $8,000 per year.

Category

Historic Preservation & Conservation

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

None

None

Budget

$8,000.00

Program 3

Economic Development in Accra, Ghana - Creating a Culinary School and B&B

Sam Baddoo of Home Tours (Accra, Ghana) has dreamed for 10 years of developing an active preservation program to bring economic development to Accra’s historic core. The James Town historic district is a vibrant but impoverished neighborhood and one of Accra’s major tourist draws. But it lacks the type of guest accommodations and restaurants that encourage tourists to spend their travel dollars here.

In 2014, AiP began working with Mr. Baddoo structuring a project to establish a culinary school and bed & breakfast in the heart of James Town. This project will provide educational opportunities and jobs for community members as well as a draw for tourists. AiP successfully partnered with Mr. Baddoo and the University of Georgia (US) in Ablekuma, Ghana in 2007 to restore a Chief’s house for use as a community center. With adequate funding, this project will be equally as successful.

The structure selected for the bed & breakfast is the historic Naa Laingoye residence. The Naa Laingoye Culinary Institute and Bed & Breakfast will initially be housed in this colonial-era structure, believed to have been built in the early 1800's. The project will demonstrate the value of the preservation and continued use of historic buildings and, it is hoped, serve as a catalyst for additional conservation projects.

Current list of partnering organizations:
• Ghana Museums & Monuments Board
• Ghana Home Tours
• Ghana Ministry of Tourism
• Ghana Tourism Authority
• Accra Municipal Authorities
• Hotel Kitchen and Tourism Institute

Initial budget estimate for restoring the Naa Laingoye house and completing the upper floor for use as the B&B is USD 35,000-50,000. The cost for developing the culinary school is still being determined.

Category

Community Economic Development

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

None

None

Budget

$50,000.00

Program 4

Saving Kullas in Kosovo

AiP is partnering with Cultural Heritage without Borders to complete conservation work at a historic stone kulla. This is one of the few remaining traditional residences in Kosovo. It will be used as a B&B to support development of a sustainable economy in the region through heritage tourism.

Category

Community Development

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

$10,000

Program 5

Conservation of Edwardian Greenhouse in Scotland

The focus of this conservation experience is on the rescue and restoration of an Edwardian-era greenhouse. This greenhouse is playing an outsize role in history. It is central to efforts to establish an arboretum of trees from around the world in order to preserve their genetic legacy. The original section of the Burgie Estate greenhouse was built 1912 by James Walker of Aberdeen. It, and the later additions, are deteriorating and in dire need of conservation. Its survival is key to continuing the development of the arboretum.

Category

Environment

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

$85,000

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    1. AiP's primary goal is to help communities save their valuable architectural heritage. Our projects originate from community requests, which average 12 per year. When community partnerships are strong and the project financially feasible, we assist in saving a meaningful piece of history that would otherwise be lost.

    2. Our secondary goal is to provide quality hands-on training in building conservation skills,reinforced by on-site experience. We aim to make the training a valuable education experience for students and professionals in related fields.

    3. Our ultimate goal is to see our projects support sustainable economic growth in each project community. In most of our communities, heritage tourism is the key to a sustainable economy and historic architecture is the primary draw for tourists.

    4. The growth of heritage tourism can bring lasting and meaningful change, as seen in Gjirokastra, Albania, where AiP has worked since 2008. Gjirokastra is beginning to see increased income for existing businesses, the development of new businesses and the creation of jobs to support the needs of tourists. Tourists come to see the old town's amazing historic architecture and to stay in restored tower houses while they are immersed in the unique visual history.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    1. Encourage students and professionals in fields related to historic preservation to attend our project work sessions by offering university credit and professional continuing education credit for the skills training and work experience they gain. Continue to improve our integration of academic and professional requirements into our hands-on project sessions.

    2. Establish long-term partnerships with corporate interests to create financial sponsorship for each project.

    3. Develop strong, active Board of Directors and Advisory Committee

    4. Maintain long-term presence, 3 or more years, in each project community to assure potential funders of our ability to positively impact communities

    5. Use social media marketing to increase outreach
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    AiP is led by a talented staff of professionals, who volunteer their time to build the organization and run the projects. Staff and Board include architects, preservationists, professors, project managers, marketing and client relations specialists and writers working together to support AiP's progress.

    The strong partnerships we build with individuals and organizations within each of our project communities greatly enhances our ability to achieve our goals. We have also built a strong network of professionals and supporters around the world, we can go to for advice and assistance.

    We are beginning to establish partnerships with university programs, whose students will gain experience and receive credit attending projects and completing much needed work.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Not available.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Not available.
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

Adventures in Preservation, to date, has received requests for assistance from 38 countries around the world. We have worked with 11 communities across the US and continue to develop new projects. Outside of the US, we have worked in Italy, Slovenia, Albania, Ecuador, Mexico, Armenia, Kenya and Ghana, and are currently developing a new project in Scotland. Our goal is to increase the support we received from individuals, corporations and foundations so that we are able to respond to a greater number of calls for help.

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

AiP's funding needs include the following items prioritized in order of importance: Funds to purchase building materials and tools for building conservation work; Funds to provide scholarships to community members wishing to participate and international volunteers without the resources to attend; Funding for AiP project experts to complete on-site building assessment and develop prioritized work plans.

photos




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Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Adventures in Preservation

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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President

Ms. Judith Broeker

Secretary

Ms. Jamie Donahoe

BIO

Judith Broeker is co-founder of Adventures in Preservation, which was preceded by her own company, Preservation UnLtd. She is a materials conservation specialist with both research and hands-on experience gained at historic structures in the United States and abroad. Judith holds a Master's degree in History with an emphasis in historic preservation. She responds to all AiP requests for preservation assistance and works with community members to develop each project.

STATEMENT FROM THE President

"Adventures in Preservation has become a leader in offering volunteer vacations directed toward saving distinctive architecture that defines a region's history and culture. The fact that well-designed heritage tourism initiatives are often the only means available to a community to bring economic development makes our work vital. In addition, historic preservation is innately “green" providing yet another compelling reason for restoring historic buildings for integrated community use, from affordable housing to community centers.

AiP envisions a world where people use, understand, and appreciate historic buildings that are vital to economic and environmental sustainability and preserve cultural identity. A goal set at our founding and still in place today is to take on projects that could not find other sources of assistance. This often takes us to countries such as Albania and communities around the world with little business and industry in their region, making our efforts to fund projects through corporate sponsorship and local grants extremely difficult.

Individuals donors can make a large impact when combined with funders who value saving the world's resources by keeping materials found in historic structures in use and out of the waste stream. Our projects preserve and restore as much of each historic structure as possible and when practical and strive to keep these buildings playing a vital role in community activities."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Judith Broeker

No affiliation

Term: Mar 2002 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
No
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity