Arts, Culture, and Humanities

School for Advanced Research

  • Santa Fe, NM
  • http://www.sarweb.org/

Mission Statement

SAR supports innovative research and public education through seminars, lectures, and residential fellowships focused on the comparative, historically informed study of human societies; promotes Indigenous creativity through artist residencies; and stewards one of the world's finest research collections of Southwest Native American art.

Main Programs

  1. Resident Scholar Program
  2. Seminar Programs
  3. J. I. Staley Prize
  4. Indian Arts Research Center
  5. SAR Press
  6. Memberships and Public Programs
  7. Stewardship of Historic Property
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

The School for Advanced Research is deeply committed to the long-standing principle of academic freedom and will continue to accept applications from scholars world-wide for our fellowships and seminars.

ruling year

1942

President since 2014

Self-reported

Dr. Michael F. Brown

Keywords

Self-reported

Anthropology, Archaeology, Native Americans, Indigenous Arts, American Southwest, Social Sciences, Humanities, Literary Arts, Native Art, American Indian, fellowships, scholars

Notes from the Nonprofit

President's Message

Spring, 2016

It's been a cold and snowy winter in Santa Fe, but the sun is already higher than it was at the December solstice and the days are lengthening perceptibly. At SAR we're heading into our busy late winter/early spring event calendar, which includes three membership lectures, three Sparks talks, six scholar colloquia, and an exciting lecture series organized by the Indian Arts Research Center in collaboration with the Ralph T. Coe Foundation. We also expect to have our Spring 2016 member field trips announced soon.

The writer and anthropologist David Treuer (Ojibwe) has joined our resident fellows as this year's Katrin H. Lamon scholar. On February 24, Treuer will be giving a public colloquium on his writing project, a book titled The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee. The author of four novels—most recently, the widely reviewed Prudence—as well as two major works of nonfiction, Treuer joins a growing list of talented Native writers who have spent time at SAR, including last summer's Lannan Foundation Indigenous Writer-in-Residence, the poet and potter Max Early (Laguna Pueblo).

Four groups of scholars will be on campus this spring for groundbreaking and interdisciplinary advanced seminars, including research team seminars funded by the National Science Foundation. In late February, a team of engineers, economists, and anthropologists will meet to share findings that have emerged from their study of the “water-energy nexus." In early March, the topic is “New Geospatial Approaches in Anthropology." In April, we'll host an advanced seminar titled “A World of Walls: Why Are We Building New Barriers to Divide Us?" Finally, in mid-May, a dozen distinguished archaeologists will be on campus to offer new interpretations of the iconography of Spiro Mounds, an important Mississippian site in eastern Oklahoma. These seminars exemplify the relevant and influential work taking place currently at SAR.

We look forward to seeing you.

Cordially,

Michael F. Brown
President

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EIN

85-0125045

Physical Address

660 Garcia Street

Santa Fe, 87505

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (A05)

Humanities Organizations (A70)

Anthropology, Sociology (V21)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

10 Year Vision Statement
SAR illuminates questions of fundamental human concern through research and dialogue among exceptional social scientists, artists, and humanists. We provide them with increasing opportunities to exert significant influence on academic, professional and public audiences through discourse, publications, and emerging communications technology.
SAR extends its reach by building innovative partnerships to promote an array of local, national, and international initiatives. Ultimately, we invigorate academic education and life-long learning among our diverse constituents by pursuing an ideal to unite research and creative expression in a distinctive school of knowledge.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Resident Scholar Program

SAR awards nine-month Resident Scholar Fellowships each year to scholars who have completed their research and analysis in the social sciences and humanities and who need time to reflect, debate, and write. Two-month Summer Scholar Fellowships are awarded to scholars to pursue research or writing projects. Applicants may be scholars from fields such as history, sociology, art, law, and philosophy who are engaged in anthropologically informed research. Both humanistically and scientifically oriented scholars are encouraged to apply. The resident scholar selection process is guided by the School’s longstanding commitment to support research that advances knowledge about human culture, evolution, history, and creative expression. SAR views its mission, its scholars, and its attractive campus environment as the connective tissue that supports the kinds of research that underlie its national reputation.

Category

Social Science Research

Population(s) Served

Adults

Native Americans/American Indians

Budget

$250,000.00

Program 2

Seminar Programs

Advanced, short, and research team seminars at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) promote communication among scholars and practitioners who are at a critical stage of research on a shared topic. Each seminar consists of up to 10 scholars — including one or two who serve as chair/s — who meet at SAR's Santa Fe campus for two to five days of intense discussion. SAR's renowned Advanced Seminar program convenes a group of scholars for a five-day seminar, the proceedings of which are considered for publication by SAR Press. Advanced Seminars are selected each year through a highly competitive application process.

Category

Social Science

Population(s) Served

Adults

Native Americans/American Indians

Budget

$75,000.00

Program 3

J. I. Staley Prize

SAR annually awards the J. I. Staley Prize, considered to be the “Pulitzer Prize of anthropology,” to a living author for a book that exemplifies outstanding scholarship and writing in anthropology. The award recognizes innovative works that go beyond traditional frontiers and dominant schools of thought in anthropology and add new dimensions to our understanding of the human species. The prize carries a cash award of $10,000.

Category

Social Science

Population(s) Served

Adults

Budget

$35,000.00

Program 4

Indian Arts Research Center

The Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) houses one of the world’s most significant collections of traditional Southwest Indian arts and artifacts, from pre-contact through the 450-year period of Spanish contact, to the present and numbering some 13,000 items. The collections and associated programs have made the IARC an outstanding cultural and educational resource for the Native American community, researchers, scholars, and the public.

The goal of IARC is to bridge the divide between creativity and scholarship by supporting initiatives and projects in Native studies, art history, and creative expression that illuminate the intersections of the social sciences, humanities, and arts. This is accomplished by providing fellowship opportunities for artists to engage in uninterrupted creativity; fostering dialogue among artists, researchers, scholars, and community members through seminars and symposia; nurturing future arts and museums professionals through experiential training; and promoting study of the IARC collection of Native arts.

In addition, up to three fellowships are awarded to advance the work of mature and emerging Native artists. Each fellowship includes a monthly stipend, housing, studio space, a supplies allowance, and travel reimbursement to and from SAR. These fellowships provide time for artists to explore new avenues of creativity, grapple with new ideas to further advance their work, and strengthen existing talents. SAR offers three artist-in-residence fellowships annually to advance the work of mature and emerging Native artists

The IARC also offers two nine-month internships to individuals who are recent college graduates, current graduate students, or junior museum professionals interested in furthering their professional museum experience and enhancing their intellectual capacity for contributing to the expanding field and discourse of museum studies. These internships, supported since 1997, provide stipends, travel, and housing and are funded through a national charitable trust and private donations.

SAR offers three artist-in-residence fellowships annually to advance the work of mature and emerging Native artists. Each fellowship includes a monthly stipend, housing, studio space, a supplies allowance, and travel reimbursement to and from campus. These fellowships provide time for artists to explore new avenues of creativity, grapple with new ideas to further advance their work, and strengthen existing talents.
The fellowships support diverse creative disciplines and can include sculpture, performance, basketry, painting, printmaking, digital art, mixed media, photography, pottery, writing, and film and video.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

Native Americans/American Indians

Other Named Groups

Budget

$615,000.00

Program 5

SAR Press

For over a century, SAR Press has published intelligent books on questions that matter. From scholarly works arising from SAR?s Advanced Seminar, Resident Scholar, and Native Artist programs to books of popular interest on the life and arts of peoples of the American Southwest, past and present, the exceptional quality and importance of SAR Press publications are widely recognized.

SAR Press also explores new digital formats for teaching public audiences on topics of anthropological importance. An example of such recent outreach efforts is Southwest Crossroads: Cultures and Histories of the American Southwest, a dynamic, interactive, on-line learning matrix of original texts, poems, fiction, maps, paintings, photographs, oral histories, and films. This engaging resource allows teachers and students in grades 7?12 to explore the many contentious stories that diverse peoples have used to make sense of themselves and the region.

Category

Social Science

Population(s) Served

Adults

Budget

$150,000.00

Program 6

Memberships and Public Programs

SAR members are entitled to a wide variety of privileges and opportunities, depending on the level of membership. Members have research and borrowing privileges at the Catherine McElvain Library; may take part in local, regional, and international field trips; have free access to special lecture series and campus tours; and 20% off the price of merchandise and SAR Press publications.

Category

Mutual, Membership Benefit

Population(s) Served

Adults

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

Program 7

Stewardship of Historic Property

Over the 109 years of the School's existence, its offices have relocated from the Palace of the Governors to the Museum of Fine Arts in Santa Fe and, after 1959, to the Hewett House on Lincoln Avenue. In 1972 the School found a permanent home on Santa Fe's historic east side. Construction of the seven acre estate began in 1927 and was the home of Martha and Elizabeth White, wealthy New York business women who relocated to Santa Fe. The White sisters were avid patrons of Indian art, and together opened the first Native American art gallery in New York City. Elizabeth was a founding member of the Indian Arts Fund (IAF) in Santa Fe and sat on SAR’s Board of Managers for twenty-five years. When Elizabeth died in 1972, she generously left the estate, named El Delirio, along with other Santa Fe properties, to the School of American Research. In that same year, the IAF disbanded and deeded its collections of Southwest Indian art to SAR. The construction of the Indian Arts Research Center in 1978 gave the collections inherited from the IAF an appropriate home. Our library holds a priceless archival collection of photographs of the construction of the estate as well the elegant gatherings hosted by the White sisters and attended by well-known artists and writers who built Santa Fe's art community. The stewardship of this collection, the historic buildings, and extensively landscaped grounds continue to be a primary concerns and goals for SAR.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

Adults

Budget

$853,000

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    SAR aims to become the preeminent institution that simultaneously nurtures innovative social science and Native American artistic creativity.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    We are pursuing this goal by (1) continually increasing the competitiveness of our selection process; (2) supporting research focused on critical issues of human concern, including sustainability, public health, intercultural communication, and heritage protection; and (3) and committing ourselves to building ever stronger relationships of trust and collaboration with New Mexico's Native American and Hispanic communities.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Our longstanding residential programs for scholars, museum interns, and Native American artists are a cornerstone of our efforts. Also of critical importance is SAR Press and the ongoing efforts of the Indian Arts Research Center to integrate Native American values and knowledge into the management of its collections.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    One important metric of success is the steadily growing number of applicants for our residential fellowships. Another is the intensity and quality of collaboration between the Indian Arts Research Center and the Native communities that are source of its remarkable collections. A third is the number of SAR members and donors, whose growing support is a measure of our success in communicating the uniqueness of our mission.

  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    In recent years we have expanded our resident scholar program by adding two scholar positions in Latino Studies. We have increased publicity efforts to make sure that regional and national audiences are more aware of SAR's key contributions to anthropology, archaeology, and Native American studies. The IARC's program of community collections review is fast becoming the best-practice standard for repositories that steward Indigenous art. Where we still have progress to make is in achieving a closer integration of our scholar and Indian arts programs, which currently run on mostly independent tracks.
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

The School for Advanced Research is deeply committed to the long-standing principle of academic freedom and will continue to accept applications from scholars world-wide for our fellowships and seminars.

Social Media

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

SCHOOL FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

School for Advanced Research

Leadership

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  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2015 and 2014
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
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President

Dr. Michael F. Brown

BIO

Raised in upstate New York, Dallas, Texas, and Kansas City, Missouri, Michael Brown received his AB degree from Princeton and a PhD in cultural anthropology from the University of Michigan. His research has covered a broad range of topics, including the indigenous peoples of Amazonia, new religious movements, and the global challenge of protecting indigenous cultural property from misuse. He has been awarded research fellowships by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Institute for Advanced Study. At SAR, he has been a resident scholar and a participant in two advanced seminars.

In addition to scholarly articles, Brown is the author of six books, including The Channeling Zone: American Spirituality in an Anxious Age (1997), Who Owns Native Culture? (2003), and Upriver: The Turbulent Life and Times of an Amazonian People (2014). He has also published general-interest articles and reviews in Natural History, Smithsonian, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the New York Times Book Review. A list of his publications, many downloadable as full-text PDF files, is available on the SAR website.

STATEMENT FROM THE President

"It is a great privilege to lead the School for Advanced Research, an institution with a long and distinguished history in Santa Fe. Over the 110 years of its existence, SAR has continually broadened its mission to become what it is today: a major center of academic research and artistic creativity that bridges social science scholarship, Native American arts, and public education. I am especially proud of the Indian Arts Research Center's pioneering work with the Native American communities that are the source of its remarkable collections. Beginning in 2016, and with the welcome support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, we have launched a new initiative that adds research in Latino Studies to the roster of activities in which SAR is actively engaged. I firmly believe that New Mexico's cultural diversity offers an optimal setting for innovative work in the arts, sciences, and humanities, leaving SAR well situated to continue contributing innovative ideas to a nation that can only prosper if the best thinking is brought to bear on the problems of our time.

Michael F. Brown, President
School for Advanced Research
June 2016"

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Dorothy Bracey

No affiliation

Term: 2007 - 2016

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?