Community Improvement, Capacity Building

YOUTH FOR TECHNOLOGY FOUNDATION

  • Louisville, KY
  • www.youthfortechnology.org

Mission Statement

To increase access to technology and education for at-risk youth, girls, and women through the appropriate use of technology. YTF believes that access to technology and education should be a basic human right. YTF programs use technology as a medium to educate, fight poverty, solve critical problems, stimulate entrepreneurship, and create a generation of change leaders.

Main Programs

  1. YTF Academy
  2. Agric-P.O.W.E.R
  3. Nigerian Women Entrepreneurs Mobile Value Added Services (NWEMVAS)
  4. Mobile Financial Services for Women (MFSW)
  5. Africa Code Week
  6. Girls in ICT Day
  7. 3D Africa
  8. Girls Rock!
  9. 3D Printing Academy for Girls
  10. PeaceOpoly
  11. YTF’s Clinton Global Initiative Commitment to Action
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

At YTF, our beneficiaries are part of the solution, rather than the problem.  YTF partners with disadvantaged youth and women in low-income communities in the United States and in developing countries in Africa including Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, and Colombia.

ruling year

2001

President and CEO

Self-reported

Mrs. Njideka U. Harry

Keywords

Self-reported

STEM, Technology, Engineering, Computer Science, 3D Printing, Innovation, Girls in ICT, Women Entrepreneurs, Community Capacity Building, After-School Academy, Citizenship, Gender Equity

Notes from the Nonprofit

Additional Award/Recognition: YTF is an Advisory Board Member of the Alliance for Affordable Internet (World Wide Web Foundation) (2016)

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013.
Register now

Also Known As

YTF

EIN

91-2125886

 Number

8301765688

Physical Address

1701 W. Muhammad Ali Boulevard

Louisville, 40203

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Rural (S32)

Citizenship Programs, Youth Development (O54)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

YTF educates young people and the people who support them—when educating mothers, teachers, and communities, youth benefit even more. YTF envisions a world where technology breaks down barriers and allows youth even greater access to education, employment, and entrepreneurship—YTF programs train participants in a range of digital literacy skills (from basic to advanced) and teaches them how to use those skills to improve their lives and to reduce poverty, improve health, and increase business opportunities. YTF Academy has graduated over 315,000 young people since its beginning in 2001. The Women Entrepreneurs Mobile Value Added Services (NWEMVAS) in Nigeria has trained over 10,000 women entrepreneurs and has increased their rate of financial inclusion and expansion of their businesses. In 2014, YTF introduced 3D printing technologies into its curriculum to inspire Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education and careers.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

YTF Academy

YTF Academy is a core program of YTF and was established in 2001. The Academy includes five programs, is tailored to rural life, encourages a participatory approach, creativity, critical thinking, innovation, and problem solving. YTF Academy is comprised of five distinct programs:

• TechKids: ages 8-12; awareness of technology applications in everyday life, demonstrates how real science works. Courses include: computer fundamentals, digital media, productivity tools (presentation, spreadsheet, and word processing), keyboard mastery, and cyber-security/privacy
• TechTeens: ages 13-19 to pursue STEM fields; participants seek solutions to real-world problems in their communities. Courses include: computer fundamentals, digital media, productivity tools (presentation, spreadsheet, and word processing), keyboard mastery, cyber-security/privacy, Corel Draw, programming, and web development
• TechCommunities: ages 20-25; hands-on experiences and peer-to-peer learning empower employee- or job creator-participants to recognize issues and propose solutions. Courses include: computer fundamentals, digital media, productivity tools (presentation, spreadsheet, and word processing), keyboard mastery, cyber-security/privacy, Pagemaker, entrepreneurship, and life skills
• TechEnhancements: for individuals who are currently in the workforce but who need to develop or enhance their skills. This program is designed for civil servants. Courses include: computer fundamentals, digital media, productivity tools (presentation, spreadsheet, and word processing), keyboard mastery, database fundamentals, and cyber-security/privacy
• 3DAfrica: prototyping and engineering spaces designed to introduce participants to 3D printing technologies. Courses include AutoCAD, Human-Centered Design (HCD), Solidworks, and programming.

YTF Academy is primarily an after-school model, but also provides education, digital literacy, and STEM enrichment during the day and weekends. It serves in-school youth and out-of-school youth. All programs are co-developed with local communities, build capacity with local schools, and focus on human-centered and scientific inquiry approaches. Each community in which YTF Academy is located has a Local Management Committee which ensures that programs meet the unique, specific needs of its youth and the needs of the community.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Adults

Budget

$300,000.00

Program 2

Agric-P.O.W.E.R

Agric-P.O.W.E.R. (Agriculture Platform Offering Women Empowerment Resources) connects agricultural extension agents to rural women and widowed farmers to close the information gap that women farmers experience. It develops woman-to-woman farmer distribution networks while employing youth as agricultural information workers.

Agric-P.O.W.E.R. is an auxiliary program.

Category

Food, Agriculture & Nutrition

Population(s) Served

Female Adults

Female Young Adults (20-25 years)

Young Adults (20-25 years) -- currently not in use

Budget

$50,000.00

Program 3

Nigerian Women Entrepreneurs Mobile Value Added Services (NWEMVAS)

NWEMVAS provides training for women entrepreneurs throughout Nigeria. Training includes classroom business skills and financial capabilities workshops, industry tours, “Power Hour” networking with women business owners, and weekly SMS business strategies (Mobile Value Added Services). YTF has added training in the use of 3D printing to increase income generation and innovate products, online business strategies, use of global online markets to generate income, mentoring female employees, and workshops for women entrepreneurs’ female employees.

NWEMVAS is a core program.

Category

Community, Business & Industry

Population(s) Served

Female Adults

Female Young Adults (20-25 years)

Budget

$300,000.00

Program 4

Mobile Financial Services for Women (MFSW)

Lack of access to financial services and capital is a significant barrier for women entrepreneurs in Nigeria. Only 30% of Nigeria’s population is banked and with more than 159 million phone subscriptions, there is great potential for agent banking and other models which enable remote access to financial services in Nigeria. The primary goal of this program is to enable a greater number of women entrepreneurs to enter the electronic payment value chain in Nigeria—a sector that is set to grow tremendously in the coming months and years.

MFSW is a core program.

Category

Community, Business & Industry

Population(s) Served

Female Adults

Female Young Adults (20-25 years)

Budget

$300,000.00

Program 5

Africa Code Week

The focus of Africa Code Week is to empower future generations with the coding tools and skills they need to thrive in the 21st Century workforce and become key actors of Africa’s economic development. At YTF, participants are encouraged to develop technology-enabled solutions to meet local needs. Africa Code Week is a week-long after-school model.

Africa Code Week is an annual program.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Female Youth/Adolescents (14 - 19 years)

Budget

$10,000.00

Program 6

Girls in ICT Day

Girls in ICT Day is an annual event that is designed to encourage and inspire girls to pursue careers in Information and Communications Technology (ICT) fields. YTF’s Girls in ICT Day offers girls the rare chance to experience the latest technology, learn about ICT careers, and be inspired by women leaders in ICT.

Girls in ICT Day is an annual program.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Female Youth/Adolescents (14 - 19 years)

Budget

$10,000.00

Program 7

3D Africa

Nigeria has the highest number of students in the world leaving to study abroad with STEM (57%) and engineering (24%) being the top 2 study abroad fields. Only 6% of women in Kenya are engineers. The 3D printing industry is estimated to grow from $3.1B (2013) to $30B (2022)—one of the fastest-growing income generation opportunities for Sub-Saharan Africa. YTF is the only social enterprise leading the way by teaching youth, girls, and women to use 3D printing and global online marketplaces to create and grow their businesses.

3D Africa is a core program.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$300,000.00

Program 8

Girls Rock!

GirlsRock! is an after-school technology and health education camp for internally-displaced girls in Soacha, Colombia, located in the rural outskirts of Bogotá. GirlsRock! integrates real and relevant issues in health, personal safety, and reproductive rights through the use of technology and teaches technology skills that empower girls to better understand issues that can negatively affect them. Participants learn to use technology to solve the health, early marriage, and community challenges they face in Colombia.

GirlsRock! is a core program.

Category

Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy

Population(s) Served

Female Youth/Adolescents (14 - 19 years)

Budget

$25,000.00

Program 9

3D Printing Academy for Girls

3D Printing Academy for Girls provides science, technology, engineering, and math inspiration for low-income girls in the United States through making, inventing, and designing the world that they envision for themselves. Not only are they introduced to all things 3D printing, but they have opportunities to be mentored by women in technology and engineering.

The program, envisioned by YTF’s founder to inspire young and adolescent girls to stay engaged with science and math through their precarious middle school years, is based on YTF’s 3D Africa program in Nigeria and Kenya. Youth are taught how 3D printing allows them to meet local needs, be the innovators of the future, and create sustainable livelihoods for themselves.

Research has shown that adolescent girls disengage from science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) during their middle school years and that enrichment programs, such as YTF’s 3D Printing Academy for Girls, are a positive influence not only for staying interested but in choosing STEM careers in their future. Currently, only 24% of those in computer sciences are women (only 8% of African American women and 7% of Latino women). Only 15% of those in engineering fields are women (just 5% of African American women and 8% of Latino women).

3D Printing Academy for Girls provides a comprehensive, industry-applicable study of 3D printing, 3D modeling, electronics, and programming and is taught heavily using the Socratic method of inquiry and discussion. Scheduling and projects are driven by individual student interest. Students are exposed to real applications of product development with electronics, 3D design and 3D printing, computer programming with Scratch, front-end development with HTML, CSS, and Bootstrap, and such work competencies as communication, empathy, and team work. In addition, girls are mentored by women in technology and engineering.

3D Printing Academy for Girls is a core program.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Female Children ( 5 - 14 years)

Female Youth/Adolescents (14 - 19 years)

Budget

$75,000.00

Program 10

PeaceOpoly

PeaceOpoly equips a cadre of youth leaders who are empowered to use technologies to monitor public services, gather data, evaluate, and mobilize their communities and leaders to act in efficiency of public service delivery. Youth use social media and data for peace and accountability. Youth leaders provide civic engagement training to 5,000 in-school and out-of-school youth, ages 15-24 years. PeaceOpoly partners with local youth-based organizations and local schools; teachers are trained in peace building skills.

PeaceOpoly is a core program.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Young Adults (20-25 years)

Budget

$250,000.00

Program 11

YTF’s Clinton Global Initiative Commitment to Action

In 2016, YTF became a Clinton Global Initiative member making a 3-year commitment on girls’ education, employability, and entrepreneurship in Nigeria. Human trafficking persists in Nigeria and has increasing by 48%, according to the Nigeria National Agency for Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons. It is the third most common crime in Nigeria yet it often goes unnoticed by many Nigerians and most of the world.

Through this commitment, YTF will train 6,000 out-of-school girls in five Nigerian states who are at risk for, or have survived, human trafficking in cutting-edge in-demand technology skills. Over the next three years, training will occur at the YTF’s digital hubs during the day or after school and will be led by master trainers, the majority of whom are women, including 3D printing experts, entrepreneur mentors, and local partners to teach sexual and reproductive health and rights. Girls will also be connected to local YTF-trained women entrepreneurs and online women entrepreneurs—particularly those in the textile and garment-making industry— for apprenticeships, internships, job shadowing, and mentorship.

YTF’s Clinton Global Initiative Commitment to Action is a core program.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Female Youth/Adolescents (14 - 19 years)

Budget

3,000,000

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Number of students who demonstrate an interest in furthering their education on the STEM track or pursuing STEM-related careers.

Target Population
Children and youth (0-19 years), At-risk youth

Connected to a Program?
YTF Academy
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Data showing the number of students furthering their education in STEM or STEM-related careers. YTF consistently attains high levels of interest in and attainment of STEM careers.

2. Number of women entrepreneurs who start/expand their businesses.

Target Population
Females, Adults

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Number of women entrepreneurs who have started or expanded businesses. Includes Mobile Financial Services for Women (MFSW) and Nigerian Women Entrepreneurs and Mobile Value Added Service (NWEMVAS).

3. Number of youth who pursue and complete post-secondary education.

Target Population
Children and youth (0-19 years), At-risk youth

Connected to a Program?
YTF Academy
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Data that shows YTF consistently attains high levels of post-secondary enrollment and completion--eliminating poverty in participants' lives.

4. Number of participants who gain employment

Target Population
Children and youth (0-19 years), At-risk youth

Connected to a Program?
YTF Academy
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
YTF graduates are highly sought and attain higher salaries, on average, than non-YTF Academy employees.

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    By 2020, YTF's goal is to be a household name for community technology across the world. To date, YTF has trained over 1.75 million youth and women in Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, Colombia, and the U.S. In developing nations, in particular, women and girls remain far behind in gender equity and education issues—YTF strives to equalize gender equity and ensure women and girls are as trained in advanced STEM skills as much as males.

    STEM remains a male-dominated field even in the U.S. YTF's goal includes training women and girls in low-income U.S. communities to attain a high level of technological proficiency—enough to ensure eradication of poverty in their lives.

    In 2016, YTF became a Clinton Global Initiative member making a three-year, $3 million Clinton Global Initiative Commitment to Action. With its partners, YTF will educate 6,000 girls who are survivors of human trafficking or who are at risk of human trafficking. The focus of this commitment is to increase the education empowerment of girls.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    YTF strategies for program effectiveness and ensuring high-quality programming include:

    • base programs on local, identified needs
    • forge partnerships with government, community-based organizations, schools, corporate organizations, businesses, and foundations to ensure success and sustainability of projects
    • establish Local Management Committees in each served community who develop program goals according to the needs of the community, establish strategies for sustainability, ensure high-quality implementation, and the attainment of goals
    • conduct focused, targeted outreach, recruitment, and marketing to those intended to serve
    • utilize traditional and social media to advertise programs and to build awareness of issues that programs address
    • hire high-quality staff and provide them with ongoing training
    • use human-centered, empathy-driven instructional strategies
    • integrate STEM skills, innovation, and scientific inquiry pedagogy
    • build capacity with local teachers by training them in YTF programs/skills and use as program tutors
    • integrate Monitoring & Evaluation strategies, measurement, and assessments
    • base instruction and student projects on participant interest
    • ensure a minimum of 60% participation in programs by females
    • establish sustainability strategies at the beginning of program implementation
    • make program revisions based on real-time monitoring and evaluation data and observations
    • use social entrepreneurship and innovation strategies to improve, replicate, and scale-up programs
    • incorporate use of new technologies and online opportunities
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    • YTF has established partnerships with a Monitoring & Evaluation (M& E) group and ensures integration of M & E instruments, measurement, tools, improvement strategies, and goal attainment in all programs
    • Staff are certified in technology and engineering, have appropriate certification to teach skills, and teach program trainers and tutors in effective implementation of programs
    • YTF's founder is an Ashoka Social Entrepreneur as well as a World Economic Forum Social Entrepreneur. As a result, YTF has visibility to a host of international forums such as the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum, is invited to moderate international panels, and contributes widely to Huffington Post and Forbes
    • Local Management Committees provide ongoing oversight of implementation, effectiveness, and success
    • Programs are developed in collaboration with local schools, communities, and leaders
    • YTF has established critical partnerships with state government agencies and officials in education, youth development, and women's affairs—these partnerships extend to local communities and officials representing these agencies at the local level
    • Experience in establishing programs in partnership with corporate and foundation funding
    • Engaged Board of Trustees—ongoing participation in program design and success
    • Programming adheres to pedagogical approach: human-centered, empathy-driven, scientific inquiry and ensures that participants are not only trained in digital literacy skills but are able to address issues and create education, employment, and entrepreneurial opportunities for themselves
    • YTF capacity includes the ability to develop programs based on unique, identified local needs (Example: Clinton Global Initiative Commitment to Action was developed based on a specific need in the local community. In response, YTF is providing a combination of YTF programs to provide education, employment, entrepreneurship, and empowerment in collaboration with a variety of local, national, and international partners)
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Education—increases in:

    • digital literacy/ICT skills
    • advanced technology skills
    • school academic performance
    • school attendance
    • transition to secondary school/high school graduation
    • STEM careers
    • life skills/competencies (e.g., independence, self-confidence, communication, teamwork, conflict management/resolution, wellbeing, presentation, organization, ethics and creativity, future prospects/outlook on life)
    • postsecondary completion

    Employment—increases in:

    • full-time employment
    • skilled certifications
    • length of employment and time between promotions
    • employment in STEM careers
    • percent of female engineers

    Entrepreneurship—increases in:

    • business startups
    • product development
    • freelance technical skills
    • number of new employee hires
    • mentorship for other YTF participants
    • amount of annual revenue
    • use of innovation and technology skills in business implementation

    Empowerment—increases in:

    • personal safety and health issues
    • advocacy skills
    • collaboration and teamwork skills
    • personal competencies (e.g., problem solving, integrity, communication, self-confidence, leadership, etc.)

    Program implementation

    • successful replication and scale-up of programs
    • additional communities across Africa and the United States
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    YTF has accomplished many goals and believes its strategies are effective in meeting the needs of local communities. YTF sees every day that technology equalizes the playing field for disadvantaged populations and for females and that an educated, skilled person has the ability to reduce or eliminate poverty forever and to be empowered for life.

    However, there are many yet to be served and many communities who need YTF programs and strategies. Specifically, YTF intends to bring YTF programming to additional communities in Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda and Colombia and to implement programs in the United States.

    Currently at 315,000 graduates from YTF Academy, YTF's goal is to increase the number of graduates in YTF Academy to 500,000 by 2020. This will done through building the capacity of teachers, awareness-raising within communities, tailored life skills, entrepreneurship, and ICT training: YTF anticipates better attendance in YTF Academy programs. YTF will partner with more similar-minded organizations in the countries it works in through a Train-the-Trainer fashion where they implement YTF Academy programs in their communities. YTF Academy programming starts with the engagement of key stakeholders at the national and local level to raise awareness of the program and promote the benefits of educating youth. YTF and its partners host workshops with Ministry of Education officials before program implementation in each community to schools within the target counties and review the objectives of the program, including the M&E framework. This helps create program buy-in at national and state levels and advocate for innovative and improved education initiatives. A meeting with principals from schools will follow to orient them on the program and teachers to act as YTF Academy ambassadors in the schools. YTF organizes cluster-based sensitization workshops with school management committees (SMCs) and Parent-Teacher Associations to educate school administration and parents on the objectives and purpose of the program and to involve them in registration.

    Finally through YTF's social franchise model, it hopes to deepen its existing partnerships in the countries currently working in. To learn more about YTF's social franchise model see: http://www.youthfortechnology.org/become-a-social-franchise/
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

At YTF, our beneficiaries are part of the solution, rather than the problem.  YTF partners with disadvantaged youth and women in low-income communities in the United States and in developing countries in Africa including Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, and Colombia.

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

2017 top funding needs are: 1) 3D Africa 2) 3D Printing Academy for Girls (U.S. Expansion) 3) YTF Academy See below for amounts needed and explanations.

Affiliations + Memberships

United Way Member Agency

Videos

photos




External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Youth for Technology Foundation Inc
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31

Sign in or create an account to view this information

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

YOUTH FOR TECHNOLOGY FOUNDATION

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

President and CEO

Mrs. Njideka U. Harry

BIO

Njideka U. Harry is the President & CEO of Youth for Technology Foundation (YTF), an innovative 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization focused on using the power of technology to transform the lives of youth and women living in developing countries. YTF's strength lies in its ability to access market demands, design developmental programs, provide linkages that accelerate business opportunities, and administer customized ICT and entrepreneurship training programs that uplift youth and women from poverty.

A social entrepreneur, Mrs. Harry serves as a consultant to several social enterprises, for-profit businesses with a social mission and international agencies on matters related to technology for development, entrepreneurship, girls/women's welfare, and economic empowerment. She has moderated and served on hundreds of panels in international forums and her work has been featured in world renowned journals, books on Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and development and in Forbes and the Huffington Post.

Mrs. Harry has a global reputation as a key thought leader in the area of ICTs and as an advocate for the awareness of and participatory development through gender and technology. She earned her BBA from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and an MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. She completed her post-graduate studies at Stanford University where she was a Reuters Digital Vision Fellow. Mrs. Harry is an Ashoka Fellow and in 2013 was awarded 'Social Entrepreneur of the Year' by the Schwab Foundation and the World Economic Forum.

STATEMENT FROM THE President and CEO

"YTF believes in the extraordinary potential of marginalized youth living, working and schooling in disadvantaged communities in the developing world and in low-income communities in the United States.  We envision a world in which our beneficiaries are equipped with adequate tools and resources, preparing them to confidently compete for 21st century global opportunities. YTF's theme is "Delivering to the Community... Bridging the Digital Canyon".  This theme was borne out of an aspiration to help communities in developing nations and in low-income communities in the U.S. embrace technology knowing that technology is not going to solve the problems of the developing world, but can be used as a tool. We envision the use of technology as a medium to educate, fight poverty, solve critical problems, stimulate entrepreneurship, and create a generation of change leaders."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Dr. Lee Rother

McGill University

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Race & Ethnicity
Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
Yes
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
Yes
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
Yes
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
Yes
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
Yes
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
Yes
We have a diversity plan
Yes
We use other methods to support diversity
Diversity notes from the nonprofit
Youth for Technology Foundation (YTF) knows that that its work rests on the fundamental assumption that the work in the nonprofit community is enriched and made better by having a diversity of voices, viewpoints, backgrounds, and skill sets. For YTF, diversity is looked at in terms of: • Race • Ethnicity • Age • Gender • Sexual Orientation • Physical Ability • Philosophy and viewpoint • Class background • Parental status • Geographical representation Together, these factors form a rich community of opinion and skills that a homogenous community cannot compete with. The YTF Board of Directors adopted the following diversity policy in 2015: • At YTF, we aspire to develop, promote, and sustain an organization culture and reputation in the communities that we serve as a high-performing organization that values, nurtures, and leverages diversity and inclusiveness in all that we do. Our team is hired locally from the countries we work in and is reflective of the local community. For instance, we primarily work in African countries of Nigeria, Kenya, and Uganda. As a result our full-time and part-time/seasonal workers are primarily of African heritage. • We define diversity in terms of race, gender, religion, culture, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, physical abilities, age, parental status, and socio-economics. • YTF exists to bring together people, ideas, and resources to break down barriers to the creation, promotion, and sustainability of a healthy and just society. • YTF is committed to ensuring the diversity of its board, staff, volunteers, and programming. We accomplish this through leadership, values, policies, and practices. We respect different experiences and cultures across this diversity and work to create a culture in which diverse people feel supported, recognized, and rewarded in making their best contributions to the mission of our organization. • We continuously review our policy to ensure that our talent pipeline shall be made up of smart, talented, engaged, and knowledgeable women and men from diverse racial, ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, cultural, professional, and class backgrounds. The board will develop and implement ongoing plans for its sustainable visibility, outreach, and recruitment to diverse communities. The board shall monitor and report its progress toward these goals annually. The board and staff will adopt appropriate benchmarks to measure annual progress. In the event that YTF does not meet the benchmarks, we evaluate what additional and more aggressive steps must be taken to meet the benchmarks.