International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project

  • New York, NY
  • http://www.thp.org

Mission Statement

The Hunger Project is a global, non-profit, strategic organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger.

In Africa, South Asia and Latin America, The Hunger Project seeks to end
hunger and poverty by empowering people to lead lives of self-reliance,
meet their own basic needs and build better futures for their children.

The Hunger Project carries out its mission through three essential
activities: mobilizing village clusters at the grassroots level to
build self-reliance, empowering women as key change agents, and forging
effective partnerships with local government.

Main Programs

  1. Epicenter Strategy

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

Areas Served Narrative

Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Mozambique, Senegal, Uganda, India, Bangladesh, Mexico, Peru

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1978

Principal Officer since 2010

Ms. Mary Ellen McNish

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

global,hunger,nutrition,empowerment, mobilization, self-reliance,women,international

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

94-2443282

 Number

2703539226

Also Known As

THP

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security N.E.C. (Q99)

Women's Rights (R24)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

THP's programs in 12 developing countries reaches over 35 million people in over 24,000 villages

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Epicenter Strategy

In Africa,
THP’s methodology is implemented through epicenters, clusters of rural villages
where women and men are mobilized to create and run their own programs to meet
basic needs. Through the Epicenter Strategy, THP builds the capacity of rural
women and men so they can successfully achieve lives of self-reliance and
dignity.

Over an approximately five-year period, an epicenter
becomes self-reliant, meaning it is able to fund its own activities and no
longer requires financial investment from THnutrition, education, adult literacy,
empowerment of women, improved farming and food storage methods, microfinance, income
generation, and water and sanitation. The strategy builds community spirit
through a momentum of accomplishment involving the entire population.

The Epicenter Strategy is sustainable. The primary resources are
the local people themselves and more effective use of local government
services. Income generation is built into the strategy from the start.
Moreover, an emphasis is placed on protecting the environment. People at our
epicenters learn composting and small-scale, environmentally sound irrigation
and fertilization techniques, as well as strategies for soil conservation,
reforestation and water management.

 

Government officials are
involved at every stage of the Epicenter Strategy. The first step is for THP to
meet with government representatives to apprise them of our approach and gain
their support. After the villagers build the epicenter multifunctional
community facility and nurses’ quarters, the local government provides
teachers, nurses, and supplies for the pre-school, adult literacy classes and
health clinic.

 
A
key component of the Epicenter Strategy is our Microfinance Program. The goal
of the Microfinance Program in each epicenter is to gain government recognition
for the microcredit facility to operate as a licensed Rural Bank, owned by
community members and managed entirely by women. The recognition of the bank is
a milestone event that signals the transition of the community into
self-reliance as the Rural Bank provides the epicenter community with
sustainable access to savings and credit facilities. To date, 19 epicenters in
seven countries have gained government recognition and function as Rural Banks.

Category

Community Development

Budget

Population Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

Areas Served Narrative

Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Mozambique, Senegal, Uganda, India, Bangladesh, Mexico, Peru

Self-reported by organization

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

THE GLOBAL HUNGER PROJECT
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Ms. Mary Ellen McNish

BIO

Mary Ellen McNish joined The Hunger Project (THP) as President and CEO in September 2010.
She came to THP after serving 10 years as General Secretary of the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC). At AFSC, Mary Ellen led the day-to-day operations of the organization, which had a budget of $47 million, a staff of 500 and 67 offices in the U.S. and overseas. Among many other accomplishments, Mary Ellen led them in creating its first strategic plan, directed development efforts including a successful $30 million capital campaign and served as the principal spokesperson for the organization, speaking out on behalf of human rights, economic justice and conflict transformation. Mary Ellen has led peace delegations to North Korea, Iran, China, Israel/Palestine, Brazil and seven African countries.
Mary Ellen has 35 years of progressive leadership experience in non-profit business settings, including as Executive Director of Development at Weill Medical College of Cornell University and New York Presbyterian Hospital, and Executive Vice President of Planned Parenthood of Maryland. Earlier in her career, she worked as a teacher and parent educator, and managed children's and women's programs, including spouse abuse prevention. She has a B.S. in Education from East Stroudsburg University and a M.S. in Business from Johns Hopkins University.
She said, "Changing people's lives from hopelessness to hopefulness, from poverty to abundance, from marginalization to full participation and from supplication to transformation is the bedrock foundation upon which The Hunger Project is built. I am grateful to have the opportunity to be part of this incredible effort."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Steven Sherwood

CWS Capital Group Inc

Term: Oct 2009 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?