Agriculture, Food, Nutrition

Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties

  • San Jose, CA
  • www.shfb.org

Mission Statement

Lead our community to ensure that anyone who needs a healthy meal can get one.

Main Programs

  1. Second Harvest Food Bank
  2. Brown Bag
  3. Family Harvest
  4. Produce Mobile
  5. Kids Now (Nutrition on Weekends)
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties

ruling year

1979

CEO

Self-reported

Kathryn Jackson

Keywords

Self-reported

Food Assistance, Hunger, Low-income People

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Also Known As

SHFB

EIN

94-2614101

 Number

2854942782

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Second Harvest Food Bank is the primary source of donated, surplus, and purchased food for nonprofit agencies in Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties.

Each month we serve over a quarter of a million people on average each month. The majority of people we serve are low-income families with children and seniors.  

Last year we provided 65 million pounds of nutritious food to low-income people in need in every zip code of our service area from Daly City to Gilroy, and from the ocean to the bay. We are one of the largest food banks in the country: about the size of three supermarkets and unlike most stores, we deliver.

We provide food efficiently through our direct service programs (see Food Bank Programs below) and by collaborating with a network of over 320 community-based organizations at over 850 different food distribution sites. Partner agencies include shelters, pantries, soup kitchens, children's programs, senior meal sites, and residential programs.

Last year volunteers contributed more than 310,000 hours of service valued at $6.6 million annually, more than doubling the size of our staff.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Second Harvest Food Bank

Second Harvest Food Bank operates several programs. Our most significant program is to provide food to hundreds of local nonprofit agencies that serve low income populations. Agencies who receive regular food allocations from us include soup kitchens, pantries, shelters, afterschool programs, senior centers, rehabilitation programs and other wrap around programs for low income households. In addition, we have specific programs that provide low income households direct access to food on a regular basis. These are outlined below. Our weekly Brown Bag Program provides 25 pounds of groceries to an average of 12,604 low-income seniors and disabled persons (age 55+) each week at 85 different distribution sites. The program also provides seniors with a social outlet and sense of purpose since participants have the opportunity to volunteer on a regular basis. Several volunteers deliver food directly to homebound clients, which affords them the opportunity to confirm that participants are safe, healthy, and well. Our Family Harvest Program provides 100 pounds of food for an average of 12,086 low-income individuals each month at 40 distinct distribution sites. Recipients are low income families with minor dependent children. The Produce Mobile Program is a farmer's market on wheels that provides fresh fruits and vegetables to approximately 4,000 low income households each month at 26 distribution sites. Our new Mobile Pantry program provides 100 pounds of food to 263 low income households each month who face significant barriers to accessing food in neighborhoods where no pantries or food assistance programs exist. Our Partners in Need Program provides weekly bags of groceries to an average of 374 low-income individuals each month, who choose to volunteer their time at our Santa Clara County or San Mateo County distribution centers. Our Food Connection Hotline provides nearly 32,000 referrals annually to individuals seeking food assistance. Hotline operators provide referrals in English, Spanish and Vietnamese. Our staff Nutritionists provide more than 400 classes each year on topics such as healthy eating, food safety, menu planning and diet related health conditions. In order to provide food to the community, we had the help of an impressive volunteer force that provided 187,294 hours of service last year, which equates to 90 full time employees - this is more than we employ.

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Program 2

Brown Bag

Provides food on a weekly basis to low-income seniors

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Program 3

Family Harvest

Provides monthly food assistance to families with dependent children.

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Program 4

Produce Mobile

Operates like a mobile farmer's market, providing fresh fruit and vegetables to communities for immediate distribution to low-income residents.

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Program 5

Kids Now (Nutrition on Weekends)

Provides weekly bags of healthy, kid-friendly food for children to take home every Friday.

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Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The mission of Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties (SHFB) is to lead Silicon Valley to ensure that anyone who needs a healthy meal can get one. Our vision is a hunger-free community. We don't believe that hunger is a foregone conclusion, and we can imagine a time when everyone has access to the healthy food they need. That vision is what drives all that we do.

    Nearly one in 10 people in Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties receives at least some of their food from Second Harvest. The profiles of those in need are changing in ways that create new challenges in terms of both reaching and serving them. For example soaring rent costs in Silicon Valley not only leave families with less money for meals but sometimes force them to live in a garage or other atypical arrangement. Without access to a kitchen, some families often turn to a poor diet of fast-food specials to stretch their available food budgets. Along with facing greater risks around malnutrition, they also cannot make good use of unprepared foods. But whatever the living situation, high cost of living is increasing the challenges around creating a hunger-free community.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Second Harvest believes that creating a hunger-free community in Silicon Valley requires a smart, comprehensive and deeply ambitious effort. The scope of that endeavor is best represented in the goals of the new strategic plan, which include increasing the number of people served by 40 percent to 350,000 monthly and growing the number of meals provided by 15 million annually over the next three years. Although ambitious, these goals are also attainable.

    We are introducing five key initiatives to increase the amount and quality of the food assistance we and others provide, including:
    1. More Food – Expanding our operations and piloting new sourcing models to make food more available.
    2. Healthy Food – Increasing our clients' consumption of the nutritious foods that lead to a healthy, productive life.
    3. Better Access – Improving our clients' access to nutritious food by identifying and reducing barriers to getting it.
    4. Lead and Influence – Leveraging community partnerships to ensure more eligible people participate in public programs such as free school meals.
    5. Moonshot – Launching an innovative effort to reimagine traditional food banking and connect more people to food.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    For more than 40 years Second Harvest has provided food to low-income individuals who had nowhere else to turn to meet one of life's most basic needs: food. Our organization has received regional and national recognition for our ability to deliver on our mission.

    Executive Leadership: Kathy Jackson, CEO of Second Harvest, was named Feeding America 2014 Network Leader of the Year for her efforts to significantly increase the amount of food provided by Second Harvest and for streamlining operations to drive down costs.

    Supply Chain Expertise: Vice President of Operations, Ralph Maltese has more than 20 years of operations, logistics, inventory control, process re-engineering, and supply chain management expertise. Ralph joined the SHFB executive team in 2013.

    Service Delivery: Vice President of Programs and Services, Bruno Pillet has more than 25 years of experience leading key initiatives such as integration, globalization, and transformation of customer support and delivery processes and tools. Bruno joined the executive team in 2015 after serving as an Encore Fellow in 2014.

    Community Engagement: Vice President of Community Engagement and Policy, Cindy McCown has over 30 years' experience at Second Harvest, and now heads up a team focused on leveraging government and community resources to feed more people.

    Space: Second Harvest owns and operates three facilities located in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties: a 22,000 square foot warehouse and volunteer center in San Carlos; a 65,000 square foot warehouse in South San Jose; and a 75,000 square foot warehouse and volunteer center in North San Jose.

    Collaborative Program Model: We are truly a collaborative organization. We partner with more than 320 community-based organizations to distribute the food we source. We provide food to more than 850 distribution sites – from soup kitchens to food pantries.

    Efficient Sourcing: We only purchase food when absolutely necessary—nearly 75% of the food we collected last year was donated. We can provide meals at a very low cost by employing efficient food sourcing strategies: we rescue food that might otherwise go to waste from growers and retailers and negotiate low prices around large-volume, bulk purchases.

    Funding: Second Harvest receives generous donations from individuals, private foundations, corporations, and community groups. More than half of our funding comes from caring individual donors. Over 1,700 groups host food and fund drives each year—unique community efforts planned, produced, and promoted in partnership with organizations to collect food and money.

    Volunteers: Hundreds of volunteers help with all aspects of our operation, from food distribution to sorting produce to providing office support. Last year, we leveraged more than 310,000 volunteer hours, at a value of $6.6 million, the equivalent of almost 150 full-time employees.

    National Network: Member of Feeding America, a nationwide network of 200 food banks.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    We measure our success by the existence of hunger overall in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties.

    The following key performance indicator will help us gauge if we are on track:
    1. Number of meals distributed to hungry households (while maintaining or improving nutritional quality)
    a. Our FY2019 goal is to provide enough food for 15 million more meals, a projected 27.6 percent increase over FY2016.
    b. Our FY2019 goal is to serve an additional 100,000 people, a projected 40 percent increase over FY2016.

    In addition to reporting out on the amount of food we distribute and our operational efficiency, we monitor the nutritional quality of the food we are distributing. Our board of directors closely monitors a variety of measures on a regular basis. Organizational metrics span all areas of our operation: financials, inventory turns, food waste, types of food collected, etc.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Major Accomplishments

    Recognized: We've been a “Top Rated Nonprofit" by GreatNonprofits for the past three years, and earned a four-star rating from Charity Navigator for ten consecutive years.

    Meeting the Rising Need: We provide food to more than a quarter of a million people each month (approximately one in 10 local residents). We provide more than 65 million pounds of food to a network of more than 320 community-based organizations at more than 850 sites across both counties.

    Efficient: We improved our supply chain and partnership strategies to improve efficiency and maximize impact.

    Committed to Nutrition: We are committed to good health. More than half of the food that we distribute is fresh produce. We distribute more fresh produce than any other food bank in the United States.

    A Leader: Over the past five years, we have evolved from primarily being a traditional food bank focused on distributing food through a supply chain to more broadly defining ourselves as leaders in hunger relief and finding the most efficient and effective ways to get food to hungry people. We have focused on increasing food stamp participation and forged new partnerships to raise awareness about hunger and connect people to the food they need. Every food stamp dollar received generates $1.79 in economic activity in our region.

    Collaboration: We are one of only a few food banks in the country that does not charge community-based organizations for the food we provide. Why is that important? By not charging, we directly leverage our partners' efforts to address homelessness, to provide job training and other services, and to improve educational outcomes, all of which help to alleviate hunger.

    Opportunity

    While we are, and have been, doing significant work to reduce local hunger, it is clear that our existing food-banking approach leaves gaps in both meals provided and people served. We need to do something different to close these gaps. We intend to launch a “moonshot" innovation effort to identify, design, and implement a new model(s) of connecting food to those who need it, explicitly outside the traditional food-banking model. We believe there is potential to:
    • More effectively intercept food that would otherwise go to waste;
    • Take better advantage of developments in information technology;
    • Increase client involvement in program design;
    • Leverage the rise of the sharing economy; and/or
    • Investigate and develop other ideas to address barriers to accessing food.

    We are also leading efforts to inform and partner around hunger issues.Only through greater awareness, commitments, and partnerships can we build a hunger-free community.

    Second Harvest is creating transformative solutions to end hunger. We can't just “food bank" hunger away. We need to be creative. Hunger is a complex problem that requires innovative and long-lasting solutions.
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties

Social Media

Accreditations

Charity Navigator

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External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK OF SANTA CLARA AND SAN MATEO COUNTIES
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
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CEO

Kathryn Jackson

BIO

Kathryn Jackson joined the Food Bank in August 2009.  With experience in non-profit board management and more than 20 years in the financial services industry, Kathryn has a proven track record of success in leading and growing large and small non-profit and for-profit organizations. Prior to joining the Food Bank, Kathy served on the Board of Directors for the Foundation for the Future, acting as Annual Campaign Chair (2006 - 2007) and President (2007- 2009). In the corporate world, Kathryn managed various line businesses as a senior-level executive with finance-based corporations specifically Bank of America Leasing and Capital, GATX Capital Corporation and D'Accord Incorporated. Kathryn has an MBA in Marketing, Finance and Accounting from the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Stanford University.

STATEMENT FROM THE CEO

"Despite the economic challenges that gripped the nation and our two counties in fiscal year 2010, by working together we made progress in fighting local hunger. We have literally quantified the annual number of “missing meals" that keep us from having a well-fed local population where no child, senior or family would face a nutritional shortfall. Our strong financial results underscore the care that we take with every dollar that you entrust to us. In stewarding those dollars and utilizing them in a highly efficient way, we strive to leverage our resources for the benefit of the community. Charity Navigator has recognized our financial stability, operational efficiency and impact by awarding Second Harvest Food Bank a four-star rating, a feat attained by a small percentage of charities nationally. Thank you for all that you do to help us breathe life into our mission. The Food Bank's story is about people...people like you, who transform our vision of a hunger-free community into a meal, one person and one day at a time."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Dan Cooperman

DLA Piper, LLP

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


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BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?