Agriculture, Food, Nutrition

THE ALAMEDA COUNTY COMMUNITY FOOD BANK INC

  • Oakland, CA
  • http://www.accfb.org

Mission Statement

Alameda County Community Food Bank passionately pursues a hunger-free community.

We serve 1 in 5 county residents by distributing healthy food through a network of 240 food pantries, soup kitchens and other community organizations across Alameda County - from Berkeley to Fremont, Oakland to Livermore.

Main Programs

  1. Food Distribution
  2. Emergency Food Helpline
  3. Nutrition
  4. Advocacy
  5. CalFresh Outreach
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Alameda County

ruling year

1985

Principal Officer since 2001

Self-reported

Ms. Suzan Bateson

Keywords

Self-reported

food bank, food distribution, hunger, food security, safety net, children and families, seniors, nutrition, community health, advocacy

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Also Known As

ACCFB

EIN

94-2960297

 Number

0647081818

Physical Address

7900 Edgewater Drive

Oakland, CA 94621

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Other Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition N.E.C. (K99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Since 1985, Alameda County Community Food Bank has been a pioneer in hunger-relief efforts, in California and nationwide. With a strategic plan hailed by Feeding America as one the boldest ever created by a food bank, we aim to provide 90 million meals to our community by 2018 – providing one meal per day to every food insecure resident of our county. Through an innovative and comprehensive approach – food sourcing and distribution, nutrition education, CalFresh outreach, and advocacy for systems change – we are a lifeline for the 116,000 neighbors turning to us each and every month.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Food Distribution

Alameda County Community Food Bank distributes more than 30 million pounds of healthy food – the equivalent of 28 million meals – to our community annually. Farm-fresh fruits and vegetables – cornerstones of a healthy diet, yet scarce in low-income neighborhoods – make up more than half of the food we provide. Our food distribution programs are as follows:

A countywide network of 240 member agencies – food pantries, soup kitchens and other community organizations – nourish our community through the distribution of fresh produce, healthy staples, and hot meals.

Our Mobile Pantry Program travels to schools and libraries offering farmer’s market-style distributions where families handpick the foods that best meet their preferences and needs (without paying, of course!)

Our Children's BackPack Program provides children who rely on free and reduced-price school meals with bags of nutritious food to sustain them over the weekends. When they return to school on Monday, they’re ready to learn and play.

Our School-Based Pantry Program establishes permanent, on-site food pantries at schools in our community, empowering them with the flexibility and resources to best meet their students’ needs.

Our Emergency Food Box Program provides families with 3-day emergency food boxes.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Budget

Program 2

Emergency Food Helpline

Our Food Bank's toll-free, Emergency Food Helpline (1-800-870-3663) is among the busiest and most efficient in California. Callers are connected to a same-day source of emergency food – a bag of free groceries or a hot meal – located close to their homes. Our team of multi-lingual staff and volunteer operators assist an average of 2,000 households every month.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Adults

Budget

Program 3

Nutrition

Our Nutrition Program offers tips, cooking classes, healthy recipes and demonstrations using foods we commonly provide. Our team can regularly be spotted at member agencies, Mobile Pantries and other community sites helping our neighbors learn about nutrition, how to maximize the food they receive from us, and shopping for and preparing healthy food on a budget.

Category

Food, Agriculture & Nutrition

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Adults

Budget

Program 4

Advocacy

Partnering with legislators in local, state and federal government, our Advocacy Department is California’s most aggressive and one of the nation’s most accomplished. Our efforts have been instrumental in creating and advocating for landmark legislation benefitting our community’s most vulnerable.

Category

Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Budget

Program 5

CalFresh Outreach

CalFresh (SNAP/food stamps) Outreach connects low-income families with government nutrition benefits – the first line of defense against hunger. A pioneer in this work, our multi-lingual outreach team has an excellent application approval rating, is responsible for generating tens of millions of dollars in local economic stimulus, and serves as the blueprint for similar programs at food banks nationwide.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Our plan is to increase the number of meals that the Food Bank and government programs provide so that every food insecure child and adult in Alameda County will have access to one meal each day, a total of 90 million meals annually by the plan's fifth year. We must develop and grow our resources, and infrastructure as well as our partnerships. We will remain committed to effecting long-term solutions by pursuing policy and systems change solutions. Beyond strengthening nutrition programs, we seek and envision a robust safety-net that ultimately reduces the number of people who lack resources for food.

    By FY18 we will distribute 90 million meals annually so that every food insecure child, adult and senior in Alameda County is assured one nutritious meal a day. This is equivalent to providing 241,860 food insecure children and adults in Alameda County one meal per day by FY18. We must continually grow our resources to manage internal and network agency infrastructure growth and innovation. We must fully realize our ability to bring partners to the table and engage them in our work and to jointly leverage government resources to end hunger in our county.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Through food acquisition, distribution and programming, we will:
    Distribute enough food for 28.9 million meals by FY18 by
    • Increasing food distribution by 5.5% annually
    • Maintaining our commitment to distributing high nutrient value foods

    Through Cal Fresh application assistance, we will:
    Connect enough households to CalFresh to provide 4.6 million meals by FY18 by
    • Leveraging partnerships to maximize Food Bank resources
    • Increasing the number of completed CalFresh applications sent to the county by 6% annually

    Through leading our community in systems change through partnerships, lobbying and community organizing, we will:
    Collectively provide up to 56.8 million additional meals through government nutrition program enrollment by:
    • Seeking to achieve full participation in federal nutrition programs among eligible Alameda County residents
    • Building a movement to end hunger by engaging the community in solutions
    • Maximizing all safety-net resources to reduce the number of people who do not have resources for food

    Through ongoing and strategic cultivation of existing and developing resources, we will:
    Increase our capacity to lead our network and our community by
    • Raising more individual and institutional funding, a 30% increase over life of plan
    • Increasing internal infrastructure's (people and facility) capacity to meet strategic goals
    • Building the capacity, ability and services of our member agency network
    • Ensuring that our board of directors has the support and tools necessary to lead
    • Tracking and communicating progress towards our strategic plan goals; recommending adjustments as needed
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    The Food Bank's three core programs – Food Acquisition and Distribution, CalFresh Outreach, and Advocacy – work in concert to provide short- , mid- and long term food assistance and resources to children and adults in Alameda County. Our CalFresh outreach program began in 2002, dedicating one half of a helpline employee's hours. Today our staff numbers 13 outreach employees, who provide application assistance at our facility and in the field almost daily. Advocacy and policy work is focused on a grassroots as well as grass tops approach. Our goal is to have our staff, volunteer advocates and community members actively engage and participate with decision makers and to have our collective efforts influence government policy.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Our goals within our three main program areas (Food Acquisition and Distribution, CalFresh Outreach, and Advocacy Through Leadership) will be tracked and updated each year.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    FOOD DISTRIBUTION
    In FY14, we provided the equivalent of 24.2 million meals to children, adults and seniors struggling with hunger. Guided by one of the nation's most robust Nutrition Programs, 58% of our total distribution (16.7 million pounds) was locally-sourced, farm-fresh produce critical to our neighbors' health and prosperity.
    Our Emergency Food Helpline referred 8,100 people per month to a bag of groceries or hot meal provided by our countywide 240-member agency network of pantries, soup kitchens and community organizations.
    The Food Bank's direct distribution programs also grew in scale and innovation. Bolstered by a customized truck donated by Waste Management and Rush Enterprises, our Mobile Pantry flourished in FY14. Traveling to schools in neighborhoods that typically lack healthy food outlets, this program grew 114% in FY14, providing the equivalent of 165,000 meals.

    ADVOCACY
    FY14 was a triumphant year for our Policy and Advocacy department. After 17 years of tireless advocacy, we were instrumental in lifting the CalFresh (food stamps) ban on certain former drug felons. Income eligibility expanded significantly to qualify more families for CalFresh, too. And the state budget responded to our call to prevent 9,800 County households from losing nearly $100 a month in food stamp benefits to federal funding cuts. Meanwhile, our policy team also spearheaded coalitions among food justice and anti-hunger colleagues – including our Food Security Summit series, launched this year.

    STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS
    Strategic partnerships are key drivers of our ability to serve our community. This is evident in efforts like our Grocery Rescue Program, which partners agencies with grocers to salvage food. In just its second year, Grocery Rescue grew 140%, providing the equivalent of 1.25 million healthy meals otherwise unnecessarily headed to landfills.
    Finally, in FY14 we were proud to be selected as a partner in Morgan Stanley's Healthy Cities, a program that funds community health solutions in three cities nationwide. As the leader of the Oakland initiative, we are implementing a multifaceted suite of solutions to address the joint problems of hunger and health among children in our neighborhoods.

    CALFRESH OUTREACH
    In partnership with Alameda County Social Services Agency, our nationally recognized
    CalFresh Outreach Program, staffed by a corps of multilingual, multicultural outreach workers, helped 3,400 households apply for critical nutrition benefits. Their efforts alone provided access to 4 million meals – a 66% increase in FY14 – while generating $19.4 million in local economic stimulus.
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Alameda County

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

Every month, thousands of Alameda County residents rely on the Food Bank for nutritious food. Your donations help provide low-income families and individuals with emergency food assistance and the most invaluable resource of all, hope. Your donations are tax-deductible. Thank you for supporting the Food Bank's hunger relief and advocacy efforts!

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

ALAMEDA COUNTY COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

THE ALAMEDA COUNTY COMMUNITY FOOD BANK INC

Leadership

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  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
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Principal Officer

Ms. Suzan Bateson

BIO

Suzan W. Bateson has been the Executive Director of Alameda County Community Food Bank since 2001. During this time, the Food Bank has nearly quadrupled its budget from $3.7 million to $13.5 million, doubled its roster of employees and doubled its annual food distribution to 29 million pounds. She was the first Food Bank leader in the nation to ban the distribution of carbonated beverages (2005), promising her board of directors that she would replace the million-pound loss in distribution with farm-fresh produce. Since Bateson's pledge in 2005, the Food Bank has increased its distribution of produce from 1 million to 16.7 million pounds annually, which accounts for nearly 60% of the total food distributed. Bateson serves as board chair of the California Association of Food Bank and is that board's former president. Suzan is a member of Feeding America's Policy Engagement and Advocacy Committee (PEAC) advisory committee. Suzan also serves on the advisory committees for Food Day and Junior League of Oakland-East Bay. Bateson attended California College of the Arts and was a participant in the Executive Program for Nonprofit Leaders at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. She lives in Moraga with her husband, John.

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

"I am extremely honored to serve as Executive Director of Alameda County Community Food Bank, an organization that truly keeps “community" at its core. With the generosity and passion of our individual donors, corporate partners, volunteers, and staff, the Food Bank is responding to a dramatic increase in need. The Bay Area's skyrocketing cost of living and cuts to critical safety net programs mean more individuals and families struggle to meet basic needs – like putting food on the table. The faces I see and the stories I hear every day deepen my commitment to providing nourishment and hope to children, adults and seniors in our community. I hope you'll join me: donate, volunteer, advocate – make us stronger."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ted Monk

Sodexo School Services

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?