Housing, Shelter

Berkeley Food and Housing Project

  • Berkeley, CA
  • www.bfhp.org

Mission Statement

To ease and end the crisis of homelessness in our community, Berkeley Food and Housing Project provides emergency food and shelter, transitional housing, permanent housing, and housing placement with support services to homeless individuals and families.

Since 1970, Berkeley Food & Housing Project has partnered with the Berkeley community -- residents, businesses, faith-based organizations, the university, the city's service providers, and government officials -- to efficiently provide services to Berkeley's homeless population.

BFHP's client strategy is threefold: To meet immediate, basic needs; to address the underlying causes of homelessness; and to develop viable, holistic and sustainable solutions. Our goal is to help our clients achieve stability and safe permanent housing.

Our 45-year history of responsive and empowering care for the neediest members of our community has led us to this point, and much of our success can be attributed to our hard-working staff who stand on the front lines with those whose dignity has been denied and whose burdens have become unbearable.

The city of Berkeley has chosen Berkeley Food & Housing Project to become the centralized access point for all homeless men and women in Berkeley seeking homeless services. We anticipate this new model will serve more people and do it more efficiently.

In addition, we are beginning our third year of collaboration with the V.A. to end homelessness among veterans and their families. This partnership has allowed us to open new offices in Richmond and Vallejo and to provide services across three counties: Contra Costa, Alameda, and Solano. To date, we have been able to help more than 450 veterans and family members with responsive and empowering care. Of these, we have assisted over 230 veteran households to retain or secure permanent housing.

We are devoted to this work, and we wish to continue as a permanent fixture in Berkeley, CA, a place that cares deeply about diversity and freedom while cherishing the quality of life it provides its residents. Please join the BFHP team in coming together to hold out a helping hand to the most vulnerable among us. In responding to the crises of homelessness and hunger, we chart a higher path for everyone.

To shelter the vulnerable, house the homeless, feed the hungry, and empower the "voiceless" is a responsibility we take seriously, and a privilege in which we take joy and comfort.

Main Programs

  1. Multi-service Center
  2. Men's Housing Program
  3. North County Women's Center
  4. Russell Street Residence and RSR annex
  5. ROADS Home/ SSVF

service areas

California

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1986

chief executive for fy 2007

Ms. Terrie Light

Self-reported by organization

co-chief executive for fy 2007

Mr. Geoffrey Green

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

Homelessness, mental health, human services, domestic violence, emergency food, soup kitchen, transitional housing, permanent housing, women and children, rapid rehousing

Self-reported by organization

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012.
Register now

EIN

94-2979073

Physical Address

1901 Fairview Street

Berkeley, CA 94703

Also Known As

BFHP

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Low-Cost Temporary Housing (includes Youth Hostels) (L40)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

BFHP assists low-income and homeless individuals with needs and disabilities that are not effectively met by mainstream social services. The agency hallmark is to provide services with compassion to foster a nurturing, healing environment that can effectively end an individual’s cycle of homelessness.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Multi-service Center

The MSC presently hosts six (6) programs / services, including:

1) Housing Case Management: rapid re-housing and housing retention

2) Shelter Plus Care: representative payee services for up to 48 households

3) Collaborative Opportunity to Address Chronic Homelessness / COACH: representative payee services for 11 chronically homeless households

4) Project HOPE / Housing Opportunities Expanded: street outreach, housing counseling, and housing placement for homeless persons residing in Albany Bulb and neighboring communities in the City of Albany

5) Post-Release Community Supervision / PRCS: housing stabilization, housing counseling and placement, and time-limited financial assistance for offenders on probation

6) Community Meal Program / Quarter-meal: annually serving up to 30,000 free meals to largely chronically homeless, “service-averse” populations

Category

Homeless

Budget

Population Served

None

None

None

Program 2

Men's Housing Program

The MHP is located in the Veteran’s Memorial Building in Downtown Berkeley and provides 48 single men’s beds and 5 emergency cots/beds on a nightly basis. Of the MHP’s 48 beds: 1) twelve (12) are reserved for men who are homeless Veterans and who may remain in the program for a period of up to 24 months; 2) ten (10) are designated for Community Housing and Shelter Services (CHASS) clients who are referred by Alameda County Social Services and receive General Assistance (if not filled daily, these beds are open to anyone referred through the City’s Centralized Shelter Reservation System operated by BFHP); 3) Twenty-six (26) are available to be placed through community referrals and direct calls to the MHP during weekdays, and evening and weekend placement through the Centralized Shelter Reservation Program. The MHP provided 12 additional beds during the 2013-14 Winter Season due to the closure of the Winter Shelter Program at the Oakland Army Base.

Category

Homeless

Budget

Population Served

None

None

None

Program 3

North County Women's Center

The NCWC houses two interconnected programs that target the unique needs of homeless women and their children. These programs include: 1) Women’s Overnight Shelter, which serves up to 32 women and their children nightly; and 2) Transitional House, which serves up to 23 individual women with disabilities and their children for a period of up to 18 months and includes dedicated units for the chronically homeless.

Category

Homeless

Budget

Population Served

None

None

None

Program 4

Russell Street Residence and RSR annex

The Russell Street Residence (RSR) provides permanent supportive housing to 17 formerly chronically homeless adults, aged 18 and older, diagnosed with serious mental illness (i.e. schizophrenia, bipolar disorder). Of the 17 beds, nine (9) are reserved for HUD-eligible clients, and eight (8) are for Community Care Licensing clients. The RSR Annex is a 4-bedroom house on the same property as RSR and provides independent housing for four (4) formerly homeless persons living with SMI. Annex residents live independently and are responsible for the maintenance of the home, cooking and cleaning.

Category

Homeless

Budget

Population Served

None

None

None

Program 5

ROADS Home/ SSVF

Made possible by the Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) Program, ROADS Home is a partnership with Anka Behavioral Health, Inc., a behavioral health specialty provider. ROADS Home is based in the City of Richmond but services a three-county target region, including Alameda, Contra Costa and Solano. The purpose of ROADS Home is to promote housing stability through the direct provision or coordination of the following:

Street, encampment and venue-based outreach
Housing counseling
Housing search and placement
Provision of time-limited financial assistance to third-party beneficiaries
Supportive services, such as:
Health care services
Daily living activities
Personal financial planning services
Transportation services
Fiduciary and payee services
Legal services
Child care services
Employment
Income support

Category

Military & Veterans

Budget

Population Served

Homeless

None

None

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Self-reported by organization

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    We believe everyone in our society has the right to food and housing, and that given the right tools and conditions, most people have the desire and ability to move themselves forward. With this underlying belief, we provide an extensive range of practical services and support, without judgment or restrictions.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    BFHP empowers struggling members of the Berkeley community to reach for transformation from homelessness to permanent housing. To facilitate this transformation, we provide an extensive range of services: from the longest running meal program, to successful permanent housing placements, as well the tools & services needed to become (and remain) housed. We provide these services in an environment that is free of judgment and open to individuals not served by any other program in the region. We operate four (4) service facilities in the City of Berkeley, and one (1) in the City of Richmond.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Almost all of our homeless clients we see have (or are at risk for) a chronic medical condition. The most common conditions are mental illness, diabetes, hypertension, and substance abuse or addiction. Many medical issues stem from exposure to detrimental environmental factors present in some poor communities and lack of access to preventive care. Illnesses worsen the more homeless individuals are exposed to harsh living conditions and suffer from chronic stress and instability.

    We work to address both the acute and long-term health needs of our clients by providing consistent, on-site health services to screen for and prevent the onset of chronic illnesses. Our health care partners help our clients manage chronic conditions and our case managers help clients find and apply for healthcare programs and benefits.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    How many meals do you serve?
    We serve approximately 100,000 meals annually.

    Is BFHP successful in finding housing for the homeless?
    For those who want to be housed, BFHP is very successful. Last year, BFHP placed 196 men and women into permanent housing. Of the women who are housed, more than 85% retain their housing for more than a year. BFHP places more than 17% of all the formerly homeless individuals who have found housing in Alameda Count

    What is BFHP doing to end homelessness?
    Our mission is to ease and end the crisis of homelessness. Our Housing Case Management Team does this by working with men and women on a one-on-one basis, providing them with essential needs and teaching them how to keep their housing. We are also involved with other agencies in a national plan to end homelessness.

    What is unique about BFHP vs. other agencies?
    Our unique approach involves partnering with our clients. Our professional, dedicated and compassionate team works alongside each individual identify their specific needs and tailor a program of services, tools and opportunities to underpin real and effective change. We develop a partnership with clientsto access the help and develop the skills they need to achieve long-lasting results, independence and habits of success.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    BFHP’s outreach to the homeless population is unique because it transitions them into permanent housing and empowers them to maintain an independent living situation despite psychiatric, physical or any other disability. This compassionate support promotes the individual’s independence and human dignity, reflecting the spirit of the community in which it is located. Partnering with city officials, the police department, hospitals, businesses, faith communities and other community-based organizations, BFHP has efficiently capitalized on limited resources to do the most for the good of society while tending to individuals’ personal needs. And it has been doing this for 40 years.
    From 2012-2013, Berkeley Food and Housing Project:

    • Maintained a commitment to our founders’ vision through the provision of more than 100,000 hot meals to the community’s homeless, hungry and poor

    • Provided more than 28,000 nights of emergency shelter to over 800 men, women and children

    • Over the last three years, we have successfully transitioned more than 1,000 individuals and families into permanent housing of their own.

    • Our transitional supportive housing programs continued to be among the highest performing of their kind in Alameda County, with 85% of clients placed in permanent housing able to maintain their housing for a minimum of one year

    • Provided more than 6,000 sessions of case management, including resource counseling, representative payee services or money management

    • With a grant from the City of Berkeley Mental Health Division, we launched a holistic nutrition and wellness program that combines cooking and nutritional instruction, health education workshops and recreational activities that mitigate obesity, hypertension, and illness – in order to improve the lives of our clients who experience severe mental illness

    • Continued the successful management of the City of Berkeley’s centralized shelter reservation system

    BFHP has received recognition from many community organizations, including the San Francisco 49ers Foundation’s “Community Quarterback Award” (2008); Berkeley Community Fund award (2007); Wells Fargo’s “Trailblazer” Award ( 2008); League of Women Voters (Berkeley, Emeryville, Albany) “Spirit of the League” Award (2007); Downtown Business Association for Excellence in Community Service Award (2005) and many others before these.

service areas

California

Self-reported by organization

Blog

The organization's Blog

Funding Needs

For transitional housing and food.

Affiliations + Memberships

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member

Chamber of Commerce

photos



External Reviews

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits
Source: greatnonprofits.org

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Berkeley Food and Housing Project
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Berkeley Food and Housing Project

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Ms. Terrie Light

co-chief executive

Mr. Geoffrey Green

BIO

Terrie Light
has spent the past eleven years easing and ending the crisis of homelessness
through her work at the Berkeley Food & Housing Project. She began her work
in 1998 as a program supervisor of transitional housing services for women and
children, and held several other managerial positions until she was promoted to
Executive Director in May 2006.
As Executive Director Terrie has shaped
a diligent, loyal team of managers who have brought, and continue to bring fiscal
and operational stability and best-practice standardization to BFHP’s programs.
The agency is responsible for 197,000 meals annually, serves 2,500 individuals,
and places over 150 people of Alameda
County’s homeless population into
permanent housing per year. Terrie has partnered and collaborated with many nonprofits
in the East Bay
in order to pool resources and create a network of safety net agencies to effect
positive change for the homeless population. She is also working with the City
of Berkeley housing department and
other Berkeley CBO’s to help create a systems change which has and will continue
to effectively house more of our community’s homeless population.

Terrie serves actively on the Board
of EveryOne Home Leadership Council, which is working to end homelessness in Alameda
County by 2020. She is a fellow of the
Leaderspring Fellowship Class of 2010, and meets monthly with other Executive
Directors who are equally interested in creating stellar nonprofit
organizations.

STATEMENT FROM THE CEO

"Executive Director, Terrie Light, has spent the past nine years easing and ending the crisis of homelessness through her work at the Berkeley Food & Housing Project. She possesses a Master's Degree, a Marriage and Family Therapist license, a teaching credential from California State Hayward and a Bachelor's Degree from UC Berkeley. Her early clinical training was at Project Eden in South Hayward, working with low-income, drug addicted and/or alcoholic addicted families, as well as people who suffer from mental illness."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Larry Rosenthal

University of California, Berkeley

Term: Mar 2011 - Sept 2012

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?