International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security

Freedom From Hunger

  • Davis, CA
  • http://www.freedomfromhunger.org

Mission Statement

Freedom from Hunger brings innovative and sustainable self-help solutions to the fight against chronic hunger and poverty. Together with local partners, we equip families with resources they need to build futures of health, hope and dignity.

Main Programs

  1. Credit with Education
  2. Microfinance and Health Protection
  3. Saving for Change
  4. Maternal & child health, non-communicable diseases & WASH
  5. Build resilience through nutrition and agricultural development

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

Areas Served Narrative

Bénin, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Madagascar, Mali, Mexico, Niger, Peru, The Philippines, Senegal, Togo, Vietnam

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1947

Interim CEO (eff. Jan. 1, 2016) since 2016

Ms. Kathleen E. Stack

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

Credit with Education, microfinance, hunger, self-help, microcredit, rural poor, women, children, youth, poverty, sustainability, loans, education, Haiti, Saving for Change, MAHP

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

95-1647835

 Number

8436095426

Physical Address

1460 Drew Ave. Ste. 300

Davis, CA 95618 4856

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

International Economic Development (Q32)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Rigorous studies have documented that women who participate in Freedom from Hunger's microfinance-plus programs have improved household food security and resilience, more money and assets available in the household, a greater sense of personal empowerment to take action in the family and community, better business practices and investments, better health practices, and better nourished, healthier children. Freedom from Hunger has 47 staff working with 104 partners in 23 countries, currently reaching more than 5 million people and benefiting a total of over 21 million. Learn more about the studies that confirm our effectiveness, here: https://www.freedomfromhunger.org/evidence-based-innovation

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Credit with Education

Women living in rural poverty must overcome numerous hardships to earn money and feed their children. Many live on $1/day or less, have suffered malnutrition their entire lives, and cannot read or write. Yet they do their best with what they have. And what they have in abundance is determination.

When a woman joins a Credit with Education program in her village, she links arms with other women she probably knows well. Together, the women receive loans and jointly guarantee repayment. Each woman saves a little money each week. They support and encourage one another to do their best.

 

At regular meetings, the women's group gathers to make repayments and deposit their savings. The women also participate in a lively and joyful learning session led by a local staff person who speaks their language and knows their culture and customs.

 

Freedom from Hunger created a curriculum for Credit with Education that directly addresses women's most pressing needs. The learning sessions are dialogue-based, incorporating new information with the knowledge and experience of the group members. The women don't need to read or write to learn. In story, role-play, demonstration, discussion and song, they explore new ideas, share what they know, and help each other find the courage to try new things that improve their lives.

Category

Community Development

Budget

609,942

Population Served

Female Adults

Female Children and Youth (infants - 19 years)

Male Adults

Program 2

Microfinance and Health Protection

Microfinance is an important contributor to the common goal of ending world poverty. But even the best microfinance programs can be undermined by the illness of borrowers or their family members, causing late repayment or even default. This is especially true for very poor, rural communities, where people are exposed to more health risks and have few options for health care. These same poor, rural communities are the ones Freedom from Hunger is determined to reach and serve with value-added microfinance.

 

Freedom from Hunger launched the Microfinance and Health Protection (MAHP) initiative in 2006 to help our in-country partners create and sustain key health protection services that complement their microfinance services by safeguarding family health and protecting clients and their families from the shocks of major health expenses.

 

Made possible in large part by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, MAHP builds on Credit with Education, which combines credit and savings services with education on health and other topics of vital interest to poor communities. Women who participate in Credit with Education programs come together every week or two to borrow money or repay loans and deposit savings. At these same meetings, or in separate community-wide meetings, women engage in learning sessions on topics such as breastfeeding, child health and nutrition, family planning, women's health and also business management and household money management.MAHP complements this education by enabling microfinance institutions to offer financial products and other services that improve access to actual healthcare services and medicines. For example, in Bolivia, a woman may learn about women's health through education at a weekly meeting, and then through the local MAHP program she also has access to regular check-ups to prevent problems or diagnose them early. If treatment is needed, she has access to health loans, health savings, or linkages to health microinsurance to pay for the services.

 

Five prominent and profitable microfinance institutions-Bandhan in India, CARD in the Philippines, CRECER in Bolivia, PADME in Benin and RCPB (a federation of credit unions) in Burkina Faso-have successfully partnered with Freedom from Hunger's technical advisors, trainers and researchers to develop their own experiments in providing health protection products and services for their poor women clients. Together we have explored and demonstrated the value of a variety of health protection options to address the common needs of microfinance clients and their families.

 

Freedom from Hunger and its partners are discovering that offering these health protection options not only protects the health and household incomes of poor families (the cost of paying for treatment can be a major setback for very poor families), it also improves their ability to repay loans on time and increases their loyalty to the microfinance institution, enabling it to better sustain and grow its operations. Some of these service innovations generate income for the microfinance institution (e.g., health loans) and others are subsidized as "marketing" costs (e.g., health education and linkages to health providers).

 

Women participating in MAHP recognize the value of these additional services. As one of the RCPB's clients said, "When you go to the market in the morning, you never know what will happen. But when you have the health savings and can get a health loan, you have the security of knowing that if something does happen, you will be protected." The leaders of our partner microfinance institutions are also convinced of the advantages that health protection brings to clients as well as to their social missions and financial bottom lines. As the initial demonstration of the MAHP innovations draws to a close, the successful MAHP products and services are being extended to thousands of additional clients.

Category

Community Development

Budget

1,271,837

Population Served

Adults

Program 3

Saving for Change

Women who live in very poor, very rural areas face a complex set of obstacles in their fight against poverty. They are much less likely to be literate and much less likely to operate a home-based business that earns more than $1/day. They are no less creditworthy, but their credit needs tend to be small and irregular, so banks cannot afford to provide them with loans. Even microfinance institutions cannot serve them due to the prohibitive costs of transporting staff to their villages. 
Further setting them back, many women who endure chronic poverty and hunger are reluctant to participate in microcredit programs. Many lack self-confidence, are unsure whether their home-based businesses can generate enough profit to repay a loan, or simply prefer to save rather than borrow. These women want very much to save money, if only a few pennies at a time, but they rarely have a safe place to keep their savings, much less earn a return on their money.
 
To overcome these barriers and help these women meet their self-help goals, Freedom from Hunger has co-developed Saving for Change with Oxfam America and Strømme Foundation of Norway, starting in Mali and now spreading to other West African countries and beyond to Latin America. Saving for Change enables groups of women to deposit savings-often starting with weekly deposits of only 20 cents-and build lump sums for predictable needs. When savings accumulate, the women in the group act as their own bankers, approving small loans to each other from their pooled savings. The interest they charge themselves for the loans goes back into the pool of savings, yielding a healthy return on the deposited savings of each member of the grouthe recordkeeping is simple (it is actually done without writing in West Africa), and the women themselves monitor all the transactions. Freedom from Hunger trains and supports local service organizations (NGOs) to train women to start their own groups and manage their own financial needs on an ongoing basis. Over time, the funds grow and allow the members to meet larger and larger financial needs such as healthcare, education, small business start-up and expansion, agriculture and even purchase of food during the hungry season before the next harvest.
  Freedom from Hunger has known for decades that when women come together regularly, many things are possible. The regular meetings women attend to deposit savings and take loans are a platform for learning, encouragement and building self-confidence. The dynamic of solidarity guarantees steady participation, repayment of loans and even the collective courage to try new things.
 
The groups also engage in Freedom from Hunger learning sessions on various topics, such as how to grow savings and how to fight and manage malaria. This education is dialog-based and does not require that women know how to read or write to participate. It fosters a sense of sisterhood among the women so that learning is shared and behavior change is mutually supported by the group members.
 
An additional benefit of the Saving for Change model in West Africa is that women members of groups, enthusiastic about the changes they are seeing in their own lives, are helping other women to form new Saving for Change groups in the same or nearby villages. Using picture-based curriculum developed by Freedom from Hunger to train group members to expand the program, Saving for Change groups are now being started by women from existing, successful groups. They are launching a true grassroots movement for change.

Category

International, Foreign Affairs & National Security

Budget

922,625

Population Served

Adults

Female Adults

Program 4

Maternal & child health, non-communicable diseases & WASH

Not available

Category

Community Development

Budget

1,345,832

Population Served

Adults

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program 5

Build resilience through nutrition and agricultural development

Not available

Category

Community Development

Budget

1,511,928

Population Served

Adults

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Self-reported by organization

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    To achieve a sustainable end to chronic hunger for millions of women and their families.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Freedom from Hunger helps people help themselves and others. Freedom from Hunger believes chronically hungry families need a holistic set of services in order to help themselves move out of poverty. We work with local organizations to develop and provide people with a portfolio of financial services that help them invest in and grow businesses, that help them save and insure themselves against predictable shocks and an unknown future, and that help them prepare for and meet their families' health needs. In addition to supporting a household's financial needs, Freedom from Hunger provides families with health, business, and financial education and links them to critical health services so that they can go on to thrive.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Since 1946, Freedom from Hunger has had a long-standing commitment and proven record for fighting to end global hunger and has always worked through local and global partnerships as a means to achieve this goal. Freedom from Hunger leverages a relatively small staff of less than 50 people, with almost 20 of them across Burkina Faso, Ecuador, India, Mali, Mexico and Peru and works through 104 partners in 23 countries. Freedom from Hunger's staff share multi-sectoral expertise in financial services, public health, agriculture, business, technology, gender and evaluation.

    Utilizing groups of women who come together regularly to meet for savings and credit services as a platform, Freedom from Hunger is able to strategically make use of these financial meeting points to impact the lives of millions of people with health, agricultural and other business services.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Freedom from Hunger's current strategic plan has the following performance goals and targets:

    1. Scale. Reach 47 million people in 10 million client households through an expanded set of products, partners, and delivery channels. We will measure scale by calculating number of clients reached via number and types of partners engaged directly or indirectly with Freedom from Hunger. Freedom from Hunger takes a conservative approach to counting beneficiaries given our stronger emphasis on quality control and impact.

    2. Customer service. Improve our customer service and sustainability of Freedom from Hunger products among partners. We will measure this by tracking which partners continue to use and deliver Freedom from Hunger products sustainably (by using such measures as operational self-sufficiency, cost of delivery, etc.). We will also engage partners in a client-satisfaction assessment and calculate the level of noted satisfaction across partners and partner-types.

    3. Innovation. We will develop new areas of core business, including social enterprises to market our content through mobile and online platforms and generate new streams of sustainable revenue. We will measure this by the number of new product lines and channels for social enterprise expansion or startups, and number of electronic and mobile-learning and other social enterprises to support delivery of our products and services.

    4. Impact. Sustainably improve food security, poverty, and other program outcomes as demonstrated by a variety of planned assessments and evaluations.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Scale. Freedom from Hunger is currently reaching 5.4 million clients of the 10 million-client target.

    Customer Service. Every year, Freedom from Hunger conducts a partner satisfaction assessment among its 181 local organizations.

    Innovation. Two mobile banking programs are under way in Benin and Burkina Faso, connecting rural households and savings groups to formal savings accounts. An elearning platform for training field agents is in the pilot phase among partners in Latin America. Mobile training tools to assist field agents in quality control of education delivery are being tested in West Africa.

    Impact. Freedom from Hunger currently has assessments under way in Burkina Faso, Ecuador, India and the Philippines.

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

Areas Served Narrative

Bénin, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Madagascar, Mali, Mexico, Niger, Peru, The Philippines, Senegal, Togo, Vietnam

Self-reported by organization

Additional Documents

Social Media

@https://www.facebook.com/FreedomfromHunger/

@https://twitter.com/freefromhunger

@https://plus.google.com/+FreedomfromhungerOrganization/videos

@https://www.linkedin.com/company/948612?trk=tyah&trkInfo=clickedVertical%3Acompany%2CclickedEntityId%3A948612%2Cidx%3A2-1-4%2CtarId%3A1453836937243%2Ctas%3Afreedom%20from%20hunger

@https://plus.google.com/101938172795757376405/about

Videos

External Reviews

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Source: greatnonprofits.org

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Freedom from Hunger
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Freedom From Hunger

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Interim CEO (eff. Jan. 1, 2016)

Ms. Kathleen E. Stack

BIO

Interim President and CEO, January 1, 2016.
Kathleen Stack has thirty-seven years of experience in international development with expertise in program design and management, strategic business planning, microfinance and microenterprise development.

Ms. Stack has been a leader in the design of financial services for the poor including Credit with Education and Savings Group methodologies. She led the development of Freedom from Hunger's business education curriculum and was instrumental in the design of the Global Financial Education Program curriculum and approach. In her various roles with Freedom from Hunger, she has provided capacity-building, training and evaluation services for microfinance and civil society organizations in Africa, Asia and Latin America and is a founding member of The SEEP Network.

Prior to joining Freedom from Hunger, Ms. Stack served as Associate Director of Plan International in Burkina Faso before becoming a Program Manager for a USAID women's credit and nutrition project in that country. She served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Mali.

Ms. Stack holds an M.A. in International Administration from the School for International Training Graduate Institute and a B.A. in Psychology from Clark University. She speaks fluent French.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ms. Marianne Udow-Phillips

Center for Healthcare Quality and Transformation

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?