Human Services

Serving Seniors

  • San Diego, CA
  • www.servingseniors.org

Mission Statement

Helping seniors in poverty live healthy and fulfilling lives.

Main Programs

  1. Nutrition
  2. Supportive Services
  3. Housing
  4. Lifelong Learning
  5. Health

ruling year

1973

chief executive for fy 1995

Mr. Paul Downey

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

seniors, elderly, affordable housing, social services, nutrition, low-income, housing, advocacy, healthy aging

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

95-2850121

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Senior Centers/Services (P81)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Accomplishments: Opening the Gary and Mary West Senior Wellness Center, an innovative model focused on proactive rather than reactive programs and services designed to help seniors age the way they want - with dignity, respect, fun, independence and good health. It has received significant national attention for the unique offerings and Senior Community Centers' ability to leverage partnerships (about 25) to enhance service delivery. One of those partnerships is with SDSU's College of Health and Human Services which provides seniors with increased access to health and social work assistance while introducing student interns to the field of geriatrics in a ""learning laboratory"" environment unlike any other experienced during their studies. Faculty members are on site to guide the students and to conduct research projects. The agency's President/CEO, Paul Downey is president of the Washington DC based National Association of Nutrition and Aging Service Programs (NANASP) - the advocacy leader in national aging policy issues. Downey is a Steering Committee member for the California Elder Index which determines ""income adequacy"" for seniors' basic needs such as food, shelter and healthcare. The data shows that about half of seniors in the state lack the money for basic needs. Priorities: Build diverse revenue streams to sustain and grow programs that meet demands of an exploding senior population. These include fundraising, social ventures, increased federal funding for seniors, investments, and generating more revenue from services currently provided. Complete the framework for an evaluation model that will demonstrate the impact of services and help with building the case for additional grants funding. Increasing advocacy efforts at all levels - nationally, statewide, and locally - is of the utmost importance, particularly as it relates to reauthorization of the Older Americans Act, a critical piece of legislation affecting all seniors.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Nutrition

Our Senior Nutrition Program addresses hunger and food insecurity among one of our community's most vulnerable populations - low income seniors age 60 and older. Nearly all our clients live at or below the poverty level, with most unable to meet their basic needs - food, housing, transportation and health care, without assistance. While all of these needs are critical, food is the most immediate concern and is what initially brings them to Senior Community Centers. Imagine having to choose between paying for prescription medication or buying food for dinner. These are the hard choices our elderly clients face every day. Access to a regular source of nutritious food is critical as we age, especially for those suffering from health issues such as diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. We make sure all seniors have access to at least one healthy and complete meal every day. For most, these meals are often their only source of nutrition and help to reduce or alleviate the anxiety and health concerns hunger can cause. We offer meals seven days a week at our downtown Wellness Center and five days a week at 7 congregate meal sites and 2 housing facilities throughout San Diego County. We also provide daily meals to over 500 homebound seniors through our Home Delivered Meals Program and offer nutrition education to all seniors to help them make good food choices for optimal health.

Category

Budget

$3,597,700.00

Population Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Adults

Program 2

Supportive Services

The Supportive Services program addresses the barriers that typically compromise the wellbeing of low-income seniors. We are their safety net, providing a comprehensive, integrated network of vital services for healthy aging that focus on prevention, intervention and education in partnership with staff they feel comfortable talking to. With the fear of having to move to a nursing home high on the list of reasons many do not seek assistance until an emergency arises, it is critical to provide a support system they can trust. The Supportive Services program is composed of three core service areas: Social Services Case Management, Homeless Prevention, Supportive Housing Services.

Category

Human Services, General/Other

Budget

$1,273,000.00

Population Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Adults

Program 3

Housing

Safe and secure permanent, affordable housing ensures that seniors remain healthy, happy, and independent for as long as possible. One of the greatest concerns expressed by our senior clients is being able to live on their own and we do all we can to support their efforts to do so. Seniors living in one of our two housing facilities have their own apartments, enter into rental agreements and pay their own rent, just as in other rental housing. The difference is that they can access on-site supportive services including a nurse, case manager, meals, computer lab/library, garden/private patio (depending on location) and social activities, all designed to address their individual needs and help them live satisfying lives.

Category

Human Services, General/Other

Budget

inc in health and wellness budget

Population Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Adults

Program 4

Lifelong Learning

The Lifelong Learning program helps seniors remain active by offering a variety of activities that engage them mentally, physically, and socially. Whether it's learning a new skill, joining an exercise class or locating a volunteer opportunity, there is something for seniors of all backgrounds. Classes are open to all seniors in the community at no or low cost and include fitness, interactive games, Health seminars, Arts and Crafts, computer skills and social activities. The Civic Engagement program highlights seniors' strengths rather than needs or weaknesses. By discovering their talents, skills and abilities, older adults are encouraged to form relationships and participate in meaningful activities to enhance the quality of their lives and give back to the community. Community volunteers are Individuals, service groups, and corporations who donate thousands of hours each year through our Serving Seniors program, serving lunch at our various locations or helping with classes.

Category

Human Services, General/Other

Budget

$200,000.00

Population Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Adults

Program 5

Health

The Health Services program is comprised of three different areas: Nurse Case Management The role of the Nurse Case Manager is to promote healthy aging and advocate for seniors healthcare needs through preventative care, empowerment, and education. Passport to Health Combines combine our care coordination services with a free-standing health kiosk located at the Gary and Mary West Senior Wellness Center. The kiosk measures vital health markers and the data is immediately sent wirelessly to the client and to Senior Community Centers' Geriatric Care Coordinator. The data is used as part of a coordinated care plan to ensure seniors receive the proper health and wellness care they need. Mental Health We provide culturally sensitive and supportive on-site mental health education, counseling, referrals and assessment We have a mental health specialist on staff and through a 17-year partnership with Sharp Mesa Vista Hospital, psychiatric nurses and a psychiatrist are helping seniors live a more stable life.

Category

Human Services, General/Other

Budget

157,314

Population Served

Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Funding Needs

The following are Senior Community Centers' most pressing needs: 1. Funding for our meals program. The link between nutrition and healthy aging is well documented. Investing in our nutrition program helps decrease ER visits, hospitalizations, days in the hospital if admitted and can delay or eliminate the need for long-term care such as nursing facilities. 2. Funds for our Health Services program. These critical services include a nurse, geriatric care coordinator and mental health specialist. 3. Funding for the Supportive Services Program. Case Managers help seniors remove the barriers that prevent them remaining healthy and independent. 4. Funding to support the Lifelong Learning program. This innovative program helps seniors maximize their potential by providing meaningful volunteer opportunities and the chance to learn new skills. It builds self-esteem and debunks the stereotype that seniors, regardless of their age, have nothing left to contribute to the community. 5. Secure the future of the organization in order to meet the increasing demographic and economic needs of low-income seniors in San Diego by building a robust endowment through planned giving and endowed funds.

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

SERVING SENIORS
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Serving Seniors

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone and website
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Mr. Paul Downey

BIO

Paul Downey became President/CEO of Serving Seniors (formerly Senior Community Centers) in 1995 and has guided the agency's innovative efforts to provide supportive services focused on keeping low-income seniors healthy and independent. Nutritious meals (breakfast and lunch) are provided 365 days per year to over 2,100 seniors at 10 sites in San Diego County. Serving Seniors' flagship facility, the Gary and Mary West Senior Wellness Center, provides case management, healthcare utilizing the latest in wireless technology, mental healthcare, life-long learning and civic engagement for the seniors. It is already considered a national model for the comprehensive provision of supportive services for seniors in poverty. Paul has been a leader in the fight to provide affordable housing for seniors. He opened a 200-unit, low-income, senior housing complex called Potiker Family Senior Residence in downtown San Diego in August of 2003. He opened a second project, a 150-unit affordable housing complex for seniors in City Heights, in August 2007. The agency also operates transitional housing for homeless seniors. He is the immediate past-President of the National Association of Nutrition and Aging Services Programs (NANASP) based in Washington DC and a Steering Committee Member for the California Elder Economic Standard Initiative. In August 2012, Paul was appointed to the California Commission on Aging by Assembly then-Speaker John A. Pérez. Diane Jacob, Chair of the San Diego County Board of Supervisors, appointed Paul in September 2013 to the County's Social Services Advisory Board. He is past chair of the City of San Diego's Senior Affairs Advisory Board and past chair of the Dean's Advisory Committee for the College of Health and Human Services at San Diego State University. He is a graduate of San Diego State University with a degree in journalism. In July 2010, he completed a certificate program in Strategic Perspectives in Non-Profit Management from Harvard Business School.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Michelle Sterling

Qualcomm

Term: July 2014 - June 2015

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


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BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?