ABERG CENTER FOR LITERACY

Building richer lives, stronger families and better communities

aka Aberg Center for Literacy   |   Dallas, TX   |  www.abergcenter.org
This organization has not appeared on the IRS Business Master File in a number of months. It may have merged with another organization or ceased operations.

Mission

Aberg Center for Literacy is building richer lives, stronger families and better communities through programs in English fluency, Spanish and English GED preparation, early childhood education and family literacy.

Ruling year info

2005

Executive Director

Shana Harrison

Main address

5100 Ross Avenue

Dallas, TX 75206 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Pre-GED School at the Cathedral

PreGED School

EIN

02-0706898

NTEE code info

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Aberg Center for Literacy addresses the serious problem that lack of adult education creates with an innovative approach targeting mothers and young children simultaneously through dual generation education. An estimated 500,000 people in Dallas County—one in five adults—can't read. Communities Foundation of Texas reports that 28% of Dallas adults do not have a high school education. Currently only 4.1% of the need for adult education services in our area is being met. According to the Mayor's Task Force on Poverty, limited English proficiency and low literacy rates are drivers of poverty and barriers to finding living wage employment in Dallas where 43% of residents are speaking languages other than English at home. Almost one in three Hispanics and African-Americans in Dallas live below the poverty line. DISD reports that 49% of second graders have limited proficiency in English.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adult Education

Aberg Center is committed to:
• Providing 6 levels of ESL classes with 2 hours of class each day
• Providing rotation for 1 hour each day of ESL enrichment opportunities according to level in pronunciation, conversation, reading and writing; computer, family, financial and health literacy

• Providing 3 levels of GED preparation classes in English and Spanish for 3 hours each day

Additionally, Aberg Center partners with area agencies to offer occasional supplemental classes or workshops based on student interest, i.e. citizenship, cooking classes, tax workshop, health insurance information session, etc.

Population(s) Served

Our Family Literacy and Early Childhood Education program is for economically disadvantaged parents and their children. Children between three months and five years old are placed in age-appropriate groups and are engaged in daily physical development, sensory discrimination, language acquisition and pre-literacy activities while their parents attend classes. The Early Childhood Education program lesson plans incorporate assessment data on each student obtained from the Early Learning Accomplishment Profile and Learning Accomplishment Profile (ELAP/LAP) and blend this feedback with KidSparkz and Growing Up Wild curricula. ELAP and LAP are used three times a year to monitor each child’s development in gross and fine motor skills, language, cognition, self-help, social-emotional, and pre-writing for older children. These tools provide valuable information to monitor, provide information to parents, and make referrals for early intervention when needed.

Parents of the children in our Early Childhood Program are required to be students in either our English fluency or high school equivalency preparation program. Our Early Childhood Education Program helps mothers reach their literacy goals by providing care and education for children so that parents can attend classes. Our programs address both parents and children and make sure that parents are able to effectively serve as their children’s first teacher to promote a healthy lifestyle, improve school readiness and achieve long-term educational success. Based on the National Center for Families Learning model, we require parents in our Family Literacy Program to commit to attend a weekly parent education class and participate two hours each week in intergenerational interactive learning activities with their children. In the spring we plan on incorporating service learning as part of the parent education class.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The numbers to the left are the total volunteer hours by year for all kinds of volunteers (professional status and non-professional status). These volunteers are engaged in all aspects of the agency.

Number of students showing improvement in test scores

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Adult Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These numbers indicate the percentage of CASAS assessments that demonstrated improvement.

Rate of student attendance during the reporting period

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Adult Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These numbers indicate the rate of retention of adult students from the fall to spring semesters in the morning programs.

Percentage of ESL students who improved a level as demonstrated on CASAS testing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Adult Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric demonstrates the percentage of ESL students who improved a skill level on CASAS Life Skills Reading, Listening or Writing assessment. This metric replaces the "improvement" metric.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

When a child arrives to Pre-K behind, it is difficult to ever catch up with peers who have developed the motor and cognitive skills required to be successful. As each year passes, if the child does not have the necessary parental support year-round, the gap widens and can snowball into dropping out of school and continuing in the cycle of poverty. More than 60% of children entering Kindergarten in DISD need remediation. Children from low-income families enter Kindergarten 12-14 months behind higher-income peers.

Our innovative work of increasing English fluency and raising the literacy levels of both parents and children is more relevant today than ever before. This two-generation approach sets us apart by emphasizing the provision of education and support to create a legacy of economic security that passes from one generation to the next, understanding that if you want to make tomorrow better for children, you have to make it better for their parents. The two-generation approach holds great promise for longer and better outcomes for vulnerable families.

Supporting Aberg Center for Literacy has a far-reaching impact on our community and the fight against poverty because a mother's reading skills are the greatest determinant of her children's future academic success.

Family Literacy and Early Childhood Education
Our Family Literacy and Early Childhood Education program is for economically disadvantaged parents and their children. Children between three months and five years old are placed in age-appropriate groups and are engaged in daily physical development, sensory discrimination, language acquisition and literacy activities (including lessons on health and well-being) while their parents attend classes. Adult students are enrolled in either our English fluency or high school equivalency preparation program. Our Early Childhood Education Program helps mothers reach their literacy goals by providing care and education for children so that parents can attend classes. Our programs address both parents and children and make sure that parents are able to effectively serve as their children's first teacher to promote a healthy lifestyle and improve school readiness and achieve long-term educational success. Parents in our Family Literacy Program commit to attend a weekly family literacy class and participate two hours each week in intergenerational interactive learning activities with their children.

English Literacy and Life Skills
We offer introductory through advanced English classes Monday through Thursday mornings from 9 a.m. until noon taught by an excellent team of volunteer instructors. Daily attendance is required September through April. Each day two hours of class are spent focusing on a different challenge of the English language: reading, grammar, writing, listening and speaking. During the third hour each day, students choose from a rotation of offerings including family, financial, health and computer literacy classes, and pronunciation classes. Additionally, conversation, reading and writing clubs are offered for the different levels. If they qualify, students may also take citizenship classes on Friday. In addition to our Monday to Thursday classes, we have teamed up with North Texas Food Bank and the YMCA to offer an occasional series of two-hour cooking classes on Fridays. Two nights a week from 7 to 9 p.m. we offer three levels of English classes at our Casa Linda site.

Spanish and English High School Equivalency Preparation
Native English speakers as well as ESL students who have reached proficiency level are encouraged to enroll in our high school equivalency preparation program Monday through Thursday mornings from 9 a.m. until noon. Students are placed in three groups and work on four subject areas per week with strong emphasis placed on mathematics. Additionally, adult basic education and high school equivalency preparation in Spanish is offered. The Plaza Comunitaria program, operated in conjunction with INEA of the Mexican government, enables students to gain basic literacy skills while also gaining recognition in the Mexican education system for completing elementary and middle school. Once students complete these levels, they transition to high school equivalency preparation.

We are able to keep our budget low with the help of 200 volunteers, many serving as teachers. We have six full-time staff members, seven part-time employees and three contractors. We have plans to add a Volunteer Coordinator and a part-time Early Childhood Education Program Supervisor at Casa Linda. The volunteer teachers cover all of the adult education classes offered Monday through Thursday. Enrichment offerings such as cooking classes, health insurance enrollment, and college and career fair are offered on Fridays. Programs are offered in two 13-week semesters with an optional 4-week session for enrichment in May. Each day it takes a minimum of 25 volunteer teachers to cover the adult programs. We collaborate extensively with other literacy organizations and those serving families living in poverty to provide maximum resources for our clients and to keep our program costs low. Additionally, we collaborate extensively with other organizations to reduce costs, avoid duplication of services and increase resources for our clients. St. Matthew's Episcopal Cathedral and Casa Linda United Methodist Church provide our office and teaching spaces. We collaborate on programs and training with Catholic Charities, Wings, YMCA, Raices, North Texas Food Bank, Dallas Children's Theater, and Ntarupt. We participate in student referrals with the Dallas Public Library, Wilkinson Center, Literacy Achieves, Literacy Instruction for Texas, Interfaith Housing Coalition, Skill Quest, Workforce Solutions of Greater Dallas, On The Road Lending, and Dallas County Community College District. We are members of the Literacy Coalition of Greater Dallas and ProLiteracy.

In the 2017-2018 school year, we served 313 adults and 66 preschool aged children. In FY2018 our retention rate for adults was 64.29% and 24% of the adult students were returning from prior years. 76.63% ESL students improved a level as demonstrated on CASAS testing. Six students obtained high school equivalency. On average, ESL students increased 6.5 points on the CASAS Life and Skills reading test, 6.3 points on the listening test, and 14.2 on the writing assessment.

In our Family Literacy Program, 80% of the parents reported reading books with their children 3 or more times per week. 96% of the parents reported an increase in self-confidence in parenting at the end of the course.

In our Early Childhood Program, 90.91% of the children who participated in the program both semesters demonstrated gains equal to or greater than their actual age change in two areas or more of the ELAP/LAP assessment, 81.26% demonstrated gains equal to or greater than their actual age change in five areas or more, and 37.5% demonstrated these gains in all seven areas of the assessment.

The following children were “on track,” demonstrating skills and knowledge appropriate for their chronological age, in the following areas: cognitive, 81.8%; fine motor, 86.3%; gross motor 90.9%; language, 77.2%; pre-writing, 90%; self-help, 77%; social-emotional 90.9%.

Financials

ABERG CENTER FOR LITERACY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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ABERG CENTER FOR LITERACY

Board of directors
as of 06/27/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Janet Schoenecker

Ashley Shultz

Merit Capital

Stephen Sale

Maury Purnell

MEP 300 COMPANY LLC

Patricia Bowles

Andrew Aberg

EnLink Midstream

Monica Ramirez

Clark Hill Strasburger

Rachael Singer

Kimberly Clark

Helen Short

Educator

James Ruberto

R,W, Baird

George Macatee, IV

Murchison Capital Partners, LP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes