Employment, Job Related

Women's Empowerment

  • Sacramento, CA
  • www.womens-empowerment.org

Mission Statement

The mission of Women's Empowerment is to educate and empower women, who are homeless, with the skills and confidence necessary to get a job, create a healthy lifestyle, and regain a home for themselves and their children.

Main Programs

  1. Women's Empowerment
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Sacramento Region

ruling year

2003

Executive Director since 2001

Self-reported

Ms. Lisa Culp

Keywords

Self-reported

women, homeless, children, job, training, employment, empowerment, homelessness, domestic violence, health, home, sacramento, california

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EIN

03-0520643

 Number

0113458609

Physical Address

1590 North A Street

Sacramento, 95811

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Housing Search Assistance (L30)

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

In 2014, Women's Empowerment provided life-changing services to more than 600 women and 91 children. 89% of women regained a safe home for themselves and their children; 88% of women got a job or enrolled in school or training. 107 secured a job in 2014.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Women's Empowerment

Women’s Empowerment educates and empowers women who are homeless with the skills and confidence necessary to secure a job, create a healthy lifestyle and regain a home for herself and her children.
Women’s Empowerment offers the most comprehensive job-readiness program in the Sacramento area designed specifically for women who are homeless. Pathways to education, training and employment are the most successful solution to ending homelessness for good.
Without a solution like Women’s Empowerment, many women and their children get trapped in the generational cycle of homelessness. At Women’s Empowerment 75% of women are survivors of domestic violence and 36% have family members who are homeless. Children who are homeless are four times more likely to experience developmental delays and worry about where they will sleep each night.

Homelessness is not only traumatizing for women and children, it is expensive – estimates show each person who is homeless can cost a community $40,000. Women’s Empowerment offers a powerful intervention that is working toward the day when every woman and child has a safe place to call home and the dignity of a job.

In our initial eight-week job-readiness program, we provide women with free onsite child care in our child development center and transportation assistance to attend classes, medical appointments and job interviews. Each woman works with a master’s level social worker to address the root causes of her homelessness. She receives health services onsite and is connected to additional health services in the community. Unlike most welfare-to-work programs, we lead with empowerment – confidence-building in a safe space where women can work on their personal growth, physically and mentally. We bring in skilled volunteers from the community that teach empowerment and job-readiness classes and who demonstrate to each woman her value to the community. With health and confidence improving, women can focus on job readiness with their employment specialist and volunteer career mentor. Our holisitic approach prepares women to implement changes that lead to a helathy body, safe home and steady paycheck.

Graduates can enroll in our advanced program that includes paid job training, certifications, GED preparation and financial literacy classes. These services are ongoing and offered to any of the 1,201 women who have graduated from Women’s Empowerment.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

Homeless

Female Adults

Infants/Babies (under age 5)

Budget

$944,000.00

Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Sacramento Region

Social Media

Videos

photos




External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

WOMEN'S EMPOWERMENT
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Women's Empowerment

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Executive Director

Ms. Lisa Culp

BIO

By the young age of 13, Lisa knew she wanted to make a difference in the community, and did so by helping those who founded Loaves & Fishes bring sandwiches to the homeless near the railroad tracks. Lisa studied both at UCLA and University of Grenoble in France, and received her degree from UC Davis. A long-time activist and voice for those less fortunate, Lisa spent 10 years after college working in Nicaragua while living on dirt floors. After seeing poverty abroad, Lisa chose to return home to raise her son. She continued working with those struggling to survive by creating various programs with Loaves & Fishes and Quinn Cottages. One of the projects Lisa designed grew into today’s Women’s Empowerment--a project that grew out of the wisdom of homeless women she was working with. She now serves as Executive Director of Women’s Empowerment, which earned Nonprofit of the Year in 2009. In 2008, she received the Woman of the Year Award from the National Association of Business Women for her vision in founding the organization. In 2010, she earned the Ruby Award for her efforts to serve the homeless, a distinction granted on a regional level.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Kellie England

Umpqua Bank

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
Yes
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
Yes
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
Yes
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan