Sonje Ayiti

Helping Haitians Help Themselves

aka Sonje Ayiti Organization, Inc. (SAO)   |   Newport, KY   |  http://www.sonje-ayiti.org

Mission

Sonje Ayiti is a group of Haitian and International Humanitarians who collaborate to uplift the Haitian community through education, economic development, and health promotion.

Ruling year info

2005

CEO

Mrs Gabrielle Aurel

Main address

637 Monroe Street

Newport, KY 41071 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

03-0550884

NTEE code info

Economic Development (S30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Sonje Ayiti Organization's mission is to help Haitians help themselves through education, Health Promotion, and Economic Development to create their own dreams, define own destiny with pride and dignity within their respective communities. Our Pathway To a Better Life (Chimen Lavi Miyo) Sustainable economic development 18 months graduation program , is designed to enable the very poorest families to improve their own lives. In 18 months, they develop dependable livelihoods. They learn to manage income-generating activities, and then receive the assets they need to jumpstart their economic activities. They then receive close accompaniment (medical assistance, clean water, weekly cash stipend for the first 6 months, assets for business of their choice, repairing habitat, build toilets, set up village savings and Credit Association (AVEK), and uplifting consciousness trainings, etc.) through case manager's weekly home visits till graduation.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education

Sonje Ayiti believes that education is the most powerful tool an individual can acquire. It allows a person to think critically, contribute to society in a more meaningful way, and create a future for themselves and their family.

Irrespective of caste, creed, or gender, education makes it possible for people to stand out as an equal amongst their peers. Sonje Ayiti believes education is the platform that makes it possible to defeat all barriers.
CIMA SCHOOL OF HOPE
Cima is small community outside of Limonade in Northern Haiti. The Cima School of Hope wasfounded in 2012 after the devastating earthquake as a two-room classroom under a tent (see picture to the left). It had a dirt floor, two teachers and approximately 30 students, including orphans, from the immediate area.

Over the past 7 years, Sonje Ayiti has been investing to create an enriching school experience for this community that has never had a school to call its own.

In 2013, a small, cinder-block building was constructed after a hurricane destroyed the tent.

From 2014 through 2017, land was purchased by Sonje Ayiti and a well was built which is used by the school & the community. Prior to this the closest available, clean water was over 1 mile walk away. A bridge was built to access the land and in October 2017, the new school building was opened. Over this time, a grade was added to the school each year.

The Cima School of Hope now has over 265 students in Pre-K through Grade 7 and 13 qualified teachers, administrators, and staff. The reputation of the school brings students from outside the immediate area and many walk several kilometers to get their education.

While much progress has been made, there is still much to do. Bathrooms were just built this year after a generous donation, and and Administration building is currently being constructed. There is also a vision to add an Open Cafeteria that can be used in the evenings for Community gatherings and Adult Education.

Are you interested in sponsoring a student or making a general donation to the continued success of the school? Please visit www-sonje-ayiti.org

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

SAO-CLM in Creole - Chimen Lavi Miyo -stands for Pathway to a Better Life. The approach is designed to enable the very poorest families to improve their own lives. In 18 months, they develop dependable livelihoods. They learn to manage income-generating activities, and then receive the assets they need to jump-start their economic activities. They then receive close accompaniment (medical assistance, clean water, cash stipend for food for the first 6 months, assets for business of their choice, repairing habitat, build toilets and self-esteem, etc.) through case manager's weekly home visits till graduation.

For more than ten years, Sonje Ayiti Organization (SAO) has supported families living in ultra-poverty in the North and North-East of Haiti. The most recent CLM cohort graduated on July 30, 2020 summarized the strides the team has shown to-date:
1. Conduct participatory selection of program participants (CLM members).
Early in the CLM member selection process, the team realized that the two-initial target communities (Paulette and Phaeton) would not have enough individuals who met the criteria for the CLM program, and so, they made a decision to expand to the nearby community of Savanne Carre. This enabled the team to successfully launch the program for 100 members.
2. Provide weekly coaching and mentoring.
For indicators associated with weekly coaching, results were as follows: 91% of members were able to read and write their names (target of 90%); 94% of members have a plan for the future (target of 95%); and 91% of members have appropriate IDs (target of 95%).
3. Distribute assets.
All (100%) of members received their initial 6-month weekly stipend as well as their selected assets.
4. Provide training in multiple income generating activities. For “asset transformation” activities (making productive use of the distributed assets), results were as follows: all CLM members received asset training (target of 100%); the average % increase in the value of assets per member was 40% (target of 40%); 97% of members
successfully diversified their income sources (target of 95%).
5. Enable access to health services.
Results for indicators linked to health services and their associated targets are as follows: by the conclusion of the program all (100%) of ill members sought medical services (target of 80%); 44 members were using family planing strategies; in the latest screening for malnutrition, the team screened 72% of children (target of 100%).
6. Establish Village Assistance Committees.
Four Village Assistance Committees were established over the course of the program, with a 78% attendance rate at the final meeting.
7. Improve household water, sanitation and hygiene.
By the end of the program 90% of members had constructed latrines (target of 100%) and 100% had access to clean water (target of 100%).
8. Provide support for housing construction/improvement.
80% of members completed housing construction (target of 95%).
9. Assess CLM members’ progress in meeting graduation criteria.
93% of members met the graduation criteria at the 17-month evaluation (target of 95%).

Based on the successes and lessons from our current 18-month exit strategy programs, SAO welcomes the opportunity to continue scaling up the CLM Program in North & Northeast Haiti with your partnership.

Emergency Seed Bank to avert Famine in Rural Haiti

Poor rural families and farmers risk serious threat to their food and nutrition security that could escalate into famine in the aftermath of COVID-19. Undernourishment and a significant drop in agricultural production rates will result if an aggressive recovery plan is not implemented to avoid sending struggling farmers even deeper into poverty traps and malnutrition. The Seed Bank uses an inter-generational approach to strengthen community and serve as a model for social and behavioral changes.

Food production is insufficient to feed the growing population. Heavy reliance is placed on imports to fill the gap from local production. Confinement as a tool to fight COVID-19 has curtailed economic activities in the U.S. and Dominican Republic, two of the largest suppliers to Haiti. Sonje-Ayiti and its partners intend to set up an agricultural seed bank focused on making nutritious seeds available to families and farmers to cultivate more than 1500 hectares of land.

Creation of an Emergency Agricultural Seed Bank to increase the availability of important crops; beans, forage, vegetables, corn, and sorghum to help poor rural families and farmers better cope with the anticipated dramatic food shortage. In collaboration with local and national partners, Sonje-Ayiti will promote a seed system to help provide a fast but adapted recovery response for the farmers. Funds will purchase 20 metric tons of Heirloom seeds during the three-month project duration.

Sonje-Ayiti is working with more than 10 organizations in the North and North-East to place special emphasis on 2300 rural families with small parcels of cultivated land around their houses. The project will be implemented with partners and other stakeholders in a collaborative participatory approach. Proposed interventions include a "seed payback system" and shared platforms to ensure interest and engagement to facilitate the program's extension in a responsible and sustainable manner.

In August 2020, Sonje-Ayiti completed Phase 1 of the seed distribution program. There were 50 households served with 1.5 tons of black beans; 1 ton each of corn, black eyed peas, and lima beans; ½ ton peanuts, spinach, and okra seeds. Cherry and citrus seeds were distributed to the CIMA School of Hope’s nursery for cultivation to help feed 300 school children. Many of these children depend on the school for their daily meal.

The distribution was attended by parents and staff of Sonje-Ayiti and CIMA School of Hope, representatives of the mayor’s office, a farmer’s association, the agricultural bureau, a women’s advocacy group, farmers, agronomists and students from the local university.

Sonje-Ayiti has planned a Phase 2 distribution in January 2021 to approximately 165 households. Distributions are dependent on additional funding, donation of seeds, and reimbursement of the prior distributions + 25% from those previously served. This reimbursement from harvest helps to promote program sustainability.

As one of Sonje Ayiti’s initial projects, our Goat/chicken distribution program has enabled many families the benefit of having a source of income, as well as a source of valuable nutrition. Our training and distribution program began in 2007 aided by a $12,000 grant from Community Coalition for Haiti, and, after receiving subsequent grants from Heifer International and as part of the IMA/ACCorD, Saint Bartholomew Catholic Church of Indiana program, has since been largely self-propagating. The idea is fairly simple: After being recommended by a local screening committee, and after being put together in a Solidarity Group of 5 (GS-5) unit (a support group of 5 families, bonded together, working on a joint project, and holding one another accountable), preparing a field of at least 1-1/2 acres, that has good water, fencing, and an adequate shelter, and undergone an intensive, 2-week training session by our trained SAO Ag staff, they are awarded 20 goats per group …including two males, and several pregnant females or 2 pregnant females per family. At the end of one year, they are to donate back to the SAO main herd offspring to help replenish the stock so that additional donations can occur to enable 5 more families ad/or individual families…and the process continues. It is not a new concept, but it is one that is highly prized in Haiti.

One of the drawbacks to native Haitian stock is that they are smaller in size, and do not produce very much milk. Sonje Ayiti has, over the course of the past year, increased the number of valuable, larger purebred stock to our herd. We now have, in our breeding herd, South African Boer, Mixed Alpine and full-size Nubians, who are considerably larger than the native Haitian variety, offering greater meat value when slaughtered, and produces enough milk, when properly managed, to significantly increase the protein value, as well as the real possibility of making and selling both butter and cheese.

We are extremely proud of this program that has made a great difference in the lives of many of our families in northern Haiti, and know that our Goat Specialists are well-respected and highly qualified to continue this program on into the future. The community families who have benefited from the Pase-Kado / Kabrit program have been very responsible with their gift and have been the best promoters for other families to endeavor to meet the strict screening process to be eligible to receive the same benefit. Sonje Ayiti never steers away from our goal of helping Haitians to help Haitians, and this program exemplifies our three fold: promoting health, education, and employment.

If you have an interest in our goat/chicken-gifting program, and would like to donate towards our efforts to continually improve our native breeding stock, or help us in our educational training efforts, please contact us at [email protected]

Koud-a-Koud / MicroCredit

One of Sonje Ayiti’s initial programs was the formation and development of the Koud-a-Koud / “Shoulder to Shoulder” "Helpiing each other stand", microcredit program, designed to help women gain a small loan to help initiate their entrepreneurial projects. SAO’s microloan program provides two forms of loans. The first form consists of small cash, short-term loans (maximum of 25,000 Gourdes / US$600) at an interest rate of 1.5%/month for working capital, the purchase of inventory, or supplies and the second form of in-kind loans, which can be made of vegetable gardens, egg, poultry products, , toiletries, etc.

Koud-a-Koud Application Guide for individual members:

To obtain a loan, applicants must meet four general criteria:

Be a mother member of a GS5, solidarity group of 5 women established by SAO;

Have at least one child between the ages of 1-15 years;

Has attended the three business classes offered by SAO: business management, loan management and business competitive environment;

Has been referred by at least two of the Asosyasyon Vilaj Pou Epay ak Kredi (AVEK) group members, and given good references.

These loans have a nearly perfect “pay back” record, and have provided great assistance to young families and women with children who are working hard to learn a business that will provide for their family’s needs, and help assure a livelihood for their future. It is our hope that we can add some additional capital so that more funds can be available to loan out to help the growing number of women who have completed their business training and are now waiting for funding to begin their enterprises.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

The CIMA School of Hope was founded in 2011 after the devastating 2010 earthquake. The two-room, dirt floor classroom under a tent was created to provide an enriching learning experience for the Limonade community that did not previously have its own school. Today, there are 12 classrooms, approximately 300 students, and 25 teachers and aides for Pre-K through Grade 9. The school's reputation attracts many students from outside the immediate area who walk several kilometers to be educated.

Local food production is insufficient to feed the growing population and heavy reliance is placed on imports to fill the gap. Confinement as a tool to fight Covid-19 has curtailed economic activities in the U.S. and Dominican Republic, two of the largest suppliers to Haiti. As school re-opens in August, the dilemma of providing a meal each school day to 300 children through June weighs heavy on the administrators. School lunch is the only meal for many of the children living in food insecurity.

Children who are hungry cannot focus, may be disruptive in class and have lower cognitive and social-emotional skills. Furthermore, these children will return to school adhering to stressful Covid-19 protocols in a new learning environment. Sonje-Ayiti will provide one meal each school day from the menu: 1) Mixed rice, beans + creole chicken sauce; 2) Spaghetti + boiled egg; 3) Black bean sauce, dumplings or soya rice; 4) White rice + black bean sauce + okra beef sauce; OR 5) Corn porridge.

Education is a pathway out of poverty and makes it possible for persons to stand out among their peers irrespective of barriers and inequities. Education fosters critical thinking and the ability to contribute to family, build community, and participate in society in a meaningful way. Children who are educated and become parents are likely to encourage their children to seek an education as they see the value and benefits created by the investment in learning.

The targets of SAO nutrition project are the rural pregnant women and children under 23 months old living in the remote and mountainous areas of Grande Rivière du Nord and Bahon, 25-30 miles to the SE of Cap-Haitien. Working with the Ministry of Health’s (MOH) and the local hospital staff and administration, we divided up the entire surrounding communities into smaller grids, provided essential training for 20+ Community Health Workers (CHW) who have since gone out into their assigned areas to assess and evaluate the various community needs and identified the target families. That data helped us design a program of services that enhanced the entire community’s capacity to deliver quality health and nutrition services to the most vulnerable.

The program has already delivered quality preventive and curative nutrition services, such as community management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) through locally-managed health centers, and on community levels using local foods and several tons of Medika Mamba, a ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF). The over-riding theme for the program: “Empowering My Mother Assures My Development”, has touched the lives of over a 1,000 mothers and children in the brief history of this program. These women and many more have benefited from their new family gardens planted and reaping a harvest, the goat exchange program adding milk, protein and income to struggling mountain families, as well as the recent gift of nearly 350 egg-laying chickens donated at Christmas by the children of Glen Oak Elementary School located in the northern suburbs of Columbus, Ohio.

Thousands of those mountain villagers are praying that the program can find the additional funding necessary to sustain the program for the next several years until all the at-risk children and mothers have gained sufficient strength to thrive on their own. The program has always worked towards providing sustainable, agricultural resources that will, given the proper time and management/support,mature to help provide each of the families healthy and abundant food through their home and community gardens, goat/rabbit/chicken crops as well as the development of a managed health network through the continued services of the Community Health Workers.

Since 2014 Sonje Ayiti and Meds & Food for Kids are implementing a malnutrition clinic for moderately and severely malnourished children in the vicinity north of Bahon following the guidelines of the MSPP for Outpatient management of moderate and severe malnutrition with Ready-To-Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF). The children are seen in Bahon . Malnutrition treatment is offered to children one day per week with the nurse and the Agent Santé in attendance for each clinic.

Your prayers, partnership help and financial support can insure that this program can continue on through its growth cycle so that it can maintain the great benefits on its own, and lift up another Haitian community

There have been times when we have seen the need to assist the MSSP / Ministry of Health to disseminate important health-related information. We recruited, screened, hired and trained our Community Health Promoters (CHP) for specific tasks within the communities involved, with each specific CHP given a specific quadrant of families, giving us a complete community coverage. One of our early programs was to equip and train our CHP team to work in and around the Limonade area training each family how to combat the spread of cholera through proper hygiene, washing and water-gathering techniques. Additional programs enabled us to set upset up 16 Oral Rehydration Ports (ORP) and traveled around each community on home visits to again pass out Aquatabs, and filtering equipment, as well as making a concerted effort to sensitize the population about the importance of maintaining safe drinking water for the community. On another occasion they held local area meetings to share important information concerning the dangers of HIV/AIDS infections, how they are passed on, prevention techniques, as well as information on STD’s and how women can negotiate with their partners to “just say no” and still maintain healthy relationships.

There is still a great deal of work that our CHP can do to help with similar health-related issues that impact the families and communities in northern Haiti. SAO is working on a quarterly continuing education program for their CHP staff to better train them in basic first aid, medical health information sharing, blood pressure / heart rate / body temperature readings, as well as a variety of other health-related issues that would enable them to be more useful to the local Ministry of Health in their screening and assessment programs. As with other Sonje Ayiti projects/programs we are currently seeking medical and financial partners to help to recruit, train and pay the salaries of these essential community servants.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people working at the SME/Coop/Enterprise on a part-time basis (< 35 hours per week) as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Young adults, Families

Related Program

Economic Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

SAO developed/transferred 2 community restaurants, 2 chicken farms to 34 new entrepreneurs. 100 individual businesses through our Pathway to a Better Life 18-month graduation program.

Number of children who have the skills necessary to maintain personal health

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth, Adolescents

Related Program

Health Promotion

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

COVID urges SAO to increase prevention campaigns, personal hygiene at SAO's school, villages and weekly health posts. Soap, mask distributions, handwashing stations at sites and training sessions.

Number of children who have the ability to use eye-hand coordination, strength, and motor control to use age-appropriate tools and utensils effectively

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

At Cima Community School of Hope, we measure progress of our preschoolers through hands on activities. lunch time. Dances, games, use of scissors, and crayons to create exhibit different motor skills.

Number of children who have the ability to understand and comprehend communication

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adolescents

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

316 SAO students (Pre-school to 9th grade) have enhanced communication skills through Klere Timoun program allowing them to develop communication, public-speaking skills, sketch, theater, arts, crafts

Number of children who have the ability to seek help from and respond appropriately to adults

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adolescents

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Children articulate themselves clearer, and respectfully to adults. They are trained to politely interact amongst themselves in-class and recreational activities to improve communication skills.

Number of children able to exercise appropriate control in independent and group activities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Team spirit is stronger, conflict management and leadership training reinforces their capacity to better cope with one another during school hours and in their respective communities. Less fight

Number of students who demonstrate writing ability

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Several students are now developing their writing skills through our Klere Timoun program which gives exposure to technology and with the use of tablets and surfaces, writing competitions.

Total number of free admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

100% free to attend school at Cima Community School of Hope and the University Students sponsored to attend college are not required to pay a fee to be eligible, but based on merits.

Number of educators who have opportunities to attend programs offered by professional organizations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Academics

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We partner with P4H Global to offer 3 year teacher professional development to our teachers and 2 other local trainers support skills development to keep our staff up to date.

Number of clients still working after 12 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Families

Related Program

Economic Development

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

AVEK members are still striving to successfully manage their business and save for future emergencies. They can loan up to 3 times the value of their weekly shares purchased. They are their own bosses

Number of savings accounts used by clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Adults

Related Program

Economic Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Through the school and CLM programs, all interested members, parents, students, teachers are trained to operate own Village Savings & Loans Associations (VSLA).

Number of teachers recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Every year 1 class is added to the school and once the class exceeds 25 students, we hire a teacher's aide to help the learning experience more conducive and fruitful

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Sonje Ayiti is currently implementing the CLM program in Phaeton, Paulette, and Savane Carré.

CLM is at the heart of Sonje Ayiti Organization (SAO) mission, vision, and values. SAO was established to work towards helping Haitians help themselves to define own destiny and live home with pride and dignity. CLM was established to reach the very poorest, and it is thus an essential piece of the SAO vision.

The CLM Program is an exit strategy in and of itself—it enables CLM members to emerge or “exit” from ultra-poverty. Upon graduating from the program, the CLM members should have the tools, skills, and confidence to continue the trajectory of their success.

As part of the program team’s long-term strategic plan, it hopes to engage other actors in Haiti, including NGOs and the government, in the implementation of the graduation approach. As such, the technical assistance and organizational capacity building support that Sonje Ayiti is offering is directly aligned with the strategic plan and CLM’s goal of ending ultra-poverty in Haiti.

As part of the program team’s long-term strategic plan, SAO hopes to strengthen relations with local municipalities and civil society organizations to engage other actors in Haiti, including NGOs and the government, in the implementation of the graduation approach. As such, the technical assistance and organizational capacity building support is directly aligned with the strategic plan and CLM’s goal of ending ultra-poverty in Haiti. By the end of the program, local municipalities and community based organizations will have the skills to serve as implementers of the graduation approach in Haiti and train other local NGOs to do the same.
The CLM Program is an exit strategy in and of itself—it enables CLM members to emerge or “exit” from ultra-poverty. Upon graduating from the program, the CLM members should have the tools, skills, and confidence to continue the trajectory of their success.

SAO is governed by a board of Directors in the US and a team of 13 in-country administrative staff managing SAO’s overall Haiti program. (1 Country Director, Chief Operations Officer, 1 Finance Director, 1 Accountant, 1 Administrative Assistant, 3 Community Development Coordinators, 1 M&E Officer, 2 CLM Case Managers). There is field staff assigned to specific projects and locations:
School Personnel of 20 full-time employees (19 teachers, 1 Principal, 1 Administrator, 1 Nurse, 1 Social Worker, 3 cooks, and 2 guardians for Pre-K to 9th grade) and 9 part-time teachers for various 7th to 9th grades courses oversee the Cima Community School of Hope in Limonade.

2 full time employees at each chicken farm in Phaeton and Paulette and 14 full-time employees run both community restaurants restaurants with 1 full-time health nutritionist to conduct home visits and monitor the health of community members.

Our central goat herd in Limonade is managed by 3 staff (1 Vet technician and 2 assistants) and 1 part-time Agronomist.

Our nutrition program in Bahon is managed by 1 nurse nutritionist, 2 Community Health Workers, and 1 Driver with a nutrition fellow paid by Meds and Food for Kids.

Our Koud-A-Koud Micro Credit now AVEK for (Village Association of Savings and Credit) program: 1 Driver, 1 Credit Coordinator, 2 Micro-credit Agents).

SAO is already implementing the exact same project in Phaeton and Paulette and Savanne Carré in the Northeast with FONKOZE providing capacity building support to expand to other villages in the North and Northeast. SAO is also implementing nutrition program in the mountains of Bailly, Montagne Noire, and Bahon since 2012 to date and have very strong ties with the communities. Parents of malnourished children received chicken layers, goats, and micro loans to generate income to prevent relapse after treatment.

We also work with the UEH university across our office and a network of 27 university graduates have been trained in the CLM approach and methodology, they also had on The Job Training (OJT) on developing the Participatory Wealth Ranking (PWR) of the current villages that the CLM program is being implemented. They are readily available to be recruited as case managers to expand the CLM program and transform lives of poor families in rural villages such as Bahon.
• SAO is currently executing the SAO/CLM program with a cohort of 200 families in these Phaeton,
Paulette, and Savane Carré villages.
• SAO works in rural areas of Haiti in the North and Northeast serving population that ranges from 2,851-52,000 since 2007.
• provides college scholarships for 2-5-year tuition to youths in rural areas based on merits and many of the graduates are currently part of our staff.
• built and operate a community school of 319 children from Pre-K to 9th grade
• Built, equipped bakery, and trained Solidarity Group of 5 (GS5)
• provides Women micro loans that range from $100-$700
• manages chicken and goat Passing the Gift distribution to families in Limonade, Bahon, Phaeton, Paulette, and Bord de Mer Limbé
• runs a weekly nutrition health posts in Bahon treating more than 524 malnourished children under 5 in the mountainous areas of Bahon. In Phaeton and Paulette,
• Rehabilitated the only water source serving 2 villages of 781 households
• built, equipped, and trained local staff to operate 2 community restaurants that cater in average 520 meals daily @ 35 Gourdes = .36 cents/meal
• built, equipped, and trained local staff to operate 2 chicken farms manage by locals; sale to the restaurants and local merchants.

We have the trust of the communities we serve and we deliver so that they can stop taking the next crudely made boat to anywhere in the hope of a better future so that they can create their own Haitian dreams.

Community engagement is a central component of the CLM strategy in the selection and subsequent support of CLM members. So as not to negatively influence or skew the identification of the poorest households, the community will not be informed about the program until the selection process begins. From then on, their engagement is critical. Through a participatory process, community leaders collaborate with the CLM team to identify the poorest households in their region. Then, a Village Assistance Committee is established.

Financials

Sonje Ayiti
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Sonje Ayiti

Board of directors
as of 04/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs. Kathleen Kool


Board co-chair

Dr. Frank Wray

Heather Hall

Carol Lyvers

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/11/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data