Child Wellness Fair, Inc.

aka CWF, Child Wellness Fund   |   Cincinnati, OH   |  www.ChildWellnessFund.com

Mission

To provide youth, parents, educators, and leaders paths on which to provide a better quality of life for their community. We do this by empowering and mentoring others to have complete ownership of their efforts.

Ruling year info

2003

Founder / Chairman

Mr. jamey ponte

Main address

5659 Hamilton Avenue

Cincinnati, OH 45224 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-3669279

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (E12)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (O12)

Recycling (C27)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

To build genuine engagement- which means fuller understanding of the deep issues we address and long term commitments. As a society it appears in depth sharing conversations are less and less approachable. Our efforts are those conversations, results and actions from those experiences. We chose not to shift to the consumerism model of nonprofit development per we do not believe it is a long term benefit to society. We also do not feel that style of operation works for us. However America is a society that is ever shifting to this model.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

If I Only Had...

The Child Wellness Fund is a unique nonprofit organization with a variety of programs. Each and every program includes three key criteria: multiple partners, a plan for self sustainability and a formal committee. In addition each of our programs fall into one of four divisions: Child Wellness Center- which includes programs that are specifically geared towards kids with special needs. This might be medically fragile, behavioral or environmental. Our second division is Child Wellness International- which holds the same criteria of all of our programs but the good deeds are carried out over seas. Currently all of our international programs are in Africa. The third division is our signature division, Child Wellness Fair- which all of our community events are staged and what we launched the nonprofit under. Holding more than 30 community events ranging from large scale fairs to small daycare visits has helped us reach many of our goals of forming collaborations within communities. Our fourth division is Child Wellness Development- serving as the funding lifeline, providing support and sustainability for each of our programs. Without raising the needed funds we simply can not deliver support to children and families.

Child Wellness Center: Wellness Experts, Let Me Read Library, Clothes for Kids Pantry, Second Home, Club SPECTRUM, Equi-kids.

Child Wellness International: Kids in Kenya, Farming for Education, Transport for College, Beaded Hope, Karama Connection.

Child Wellness Fair: Firefighter Competition, Kids Got Talnet, Maternity Matters, Child Wellness On Tour, Quality of Life WALK, Child Wellness Funk, NDSN Quarter Auction.

Child Wellness Development: Beneficiary Partners, Legacy & Scholarships, NDSN Ambassadors, Fire & Safety Initiative, Jerry Handorf Fund, Leadership Awards, Twisted Creek Farm.

Population(s) Served
Families

Mini libraries for everyday people to have access to books in Kenya.

Population(s) Served
Adults

mentoring and youth development

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Development and character building through Arts

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Developing a better citizen and society that slows down and sees and understands actions and reactions.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We have a very broad range of individuals and communities served. Including neighborhoods within the Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky region of the USA. Extreme rural communities as well as Slum Settlements in East Africa- with focus in Kenya. Also in a broader scope we focus on community leaders, facilitators and doers that organize community events and social justice actions and awareness. This includes youth and seniors, all income levels as well as race and cultural backgrounds. Many actions and efforts include creatives such as visual artist, writers and performers. Example in 2019 we held program and actions with individuals representing more than 29 countries around the globe.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Since our inception we have always worked with community inputs. It is our entire model of operations. A recent example is in the Kibera slums of Kenya, for years we have been developing youth in leadership and micro businesses. With a focus on artists we had for years dreamed of a way that the artist had complete ownership of their efforts. This when first sought after was simply not a reality per where the communities mindsets were. Over time social norms, practices and understandings slowly shifted and we saw an opportunity to launch a program that had been nurtured fro nearly eight years prior. The youth artist community is now developing it's own Kibera Arts District where they rent space and operate their own business with mentoring through our leadership.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Since our inception we have always worked with community inputs and evaluations. It is our entire model of operations.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Child Wellness Fair, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Child Wellness Fair, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Greg Greg Szumlas


Board co-chair

Aaron Buda

Aaron Buda

Greg Szumlas

Jamey Ponte

Ronelle Stewart

Greg Lalonde

J White

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/22/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.