PLATINUM2022

Cambridge Camping Association, Inc.

aka Cambridge Camping   |   Cambridge, MA   |  www.cambridgecamping.org

Mission

Cambridge Camping's mission is to provide meaningful, inspiring experiences to children from urban, under-resourced circumstances in supportive and inclusive summer-day-camp and out-of-school time communities. Our work demands a commitment to accessibility and to addressing obstacles that might hamper a child’s ability to register for or participate in programming. Among these barriers are cost, transportation, and language. While we offer programming to children and teens, our work serves families and includes outreach and advocacy. Cambridge Camping is an active participant in the city and in the non-profit community, and strongly believes in bringing practitioners and families together to foster the “Village” needed to engage, serve, and promote the well-being of the under-served.

Ruling year info

1936

Principal Officer

Ms Sharon Zimmerman

Co Principal Officer

Sean Effel

Main address

99 Bishop Allen Drive

Cambridge, MA 02139 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-6002073

NTEE code info

Recreational and Sporting Camps (Day, Overnight, etc.) (N20)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The need for accessible, trauma-sensitive summer programming for youth 5-18 has intensified in Cambridge and the greater Boston area. A 2017 needs assessment found 43% of Cambridge residents were financially insecure. 38% of families in Cambridge are led by women live in poverty, and people of color experience poverty at twice the rate of the overall population. 20% of Cambridge residents born outside of the U.S. live in poverty. 75-80% of campers qualify for free/reduced lunch; 85-90% are nonwhite. Over 70% of our campers have histories of trauma. Some have experienced community violence, bullying or repeated school failure; others are recent immigrants, facing uncertainty in the current political climate. Some receive services from the Departments of Mental Health and Children and Families and/or have special needs. Childhood trauma and sustained stress hamper the development of relationship and self-regulation skills needed for school success.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adventure Day Camp

In 1969 Cambridge Camping founded Adventure Day Camp, previously called Cambridge Adventure Day Camp. The camp serves 100 children from under-resourced families ages 5-11 and has a strong multicultural focus which is reflected in the diversity of its campers, staff, and program. Camp operates for one 5-week session and provides daily transportation, lunch, and snacks. The goal of ADC is to provide a dynamic, engaging, and enriching summer that allows children to stretch beyond their current boundaries and develop their leadership potential. One day each week all campers spend the day at a state beach. The camp provides weekly swim lessons, tennis lessons, and pool visits. Additional field trips include nature centers, farms, and museums.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

For 29 years, Daybreak Day Camp has been the only accessible summer program in Cambridge specifically designed for children facing challenges associated with PTSD, ADHD, mood disorders, autism, anxiety, and other social-emotional and learning issues. 80% qualify for free and reduced lunch. Most significantly, more than 80% of our campers have a history of trauma. With a 2:1 camper to staff ratio and an environment designed to be trauma-sensitive and responsive to camper needs, Daybreak provides a setting where children, despite their challenges, can find connection and success. Counselors are trained to understand the impact of campers' diagnoses, to teach play skills and problem-solving, and to provide therapeutic support as needed, using evidenced-based practices that teach campers strategies for managing stress and for self-regulation. Daybreak activities are designed to maximize opportunities for success and with attention to campers’ needs. As of 2018, there is also Club Daybreak, an eight-week Saturday program during the school year, to increase the impact that Daybreak has in the lives of our campers. Club Daybreak provides 5 hours of programming weekly. Campers participate in intensive learning experiences, mirroring the kinds of lessons that children with more financial resources and less need for individualized attention might enjoy, and then have structured play time and lunch in the community with staff to further develop strong mentoring relationships with adults that campers know well from the summer program.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with psychosocial disabilities

The Overnight Scholarship Program (OSP) partners with residential camps in New England. OSP serves roughly 50 children, ages 8 - 16, throughout Greater Boston. Funding for camp limits family expense from $100 to $300 per camp session.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

As a delegate agency for the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families, Cambridge Camping places over 200 children in day and overnight camps throughout eastern Massachusetts.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

CCA’s school-year Vacation Camps fill an urgent need for structured activity for youth ages 11-13 during
school vacations. These are themed programs like discovering connections between the culinary arts
and STEAM concepts or science and nature. These campers receive all program supplies, transportation
and food at no cost.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Preteens
Low-income people

A workshop series for families, staff, community members and caregivers who work with youngsters
impacted by trauma or disability. The series’ unique approach brings people together to build
relationships with others who share similar challenges in an effort to build a community of support.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of campers enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, At-risk youth, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These numbers reflect the total number of campers served by CADC and Daybreak day camps and the CCAccess program (including DCF placement program).

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CCA provides scholarship funds for all campers in Daybreak Day Camp, CADC, and CCAccess.

Total weeks of camp provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of weeks of camp includes all three programs.

Number of staff who had opportunities to work in a trauma-sensitive environment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Staff at both CADC and Daybreak Day Camp work in a trauma-sensitive environment.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

After 127 years of providing services to over 25,000 urban, low-income youth, CCA’s goals are to assist as many families as possible in Greater Cambridge and Boston to access summer programming for youth 5-18; provide unique workforce development opportunities to youngsters, young adults and young professionals who have grown up at camp and are ready to give back to their camp communities and their communities at large; and increase services to provide ongoing relationships with our campers and families throughout the year. For instance, the data shows that forming healthy and ongoing adult relationships is critical for working with children who have been impacted by trauma so in 2018 we expanded programming to include a Saturday school year program for campers and added a training component for parents, caregivers, and staff around self-care and trauma-sensitive care.

CCA addresses the challenges of access to affordable and quality summer programming for kids from under-resourced families. Understanding the needs of our families, we also address issues related to 1) navigating systems and resources (health system, access to computers, school referrals, and state-provided vouchers for tuition) to get kids enrolled in our camps; 2) language barriers; 3) transportation; 4) summer learning loss; and 5) access to other resources like special needs supports in schools, case management, mental health services, housing, food, and clothing. Our approach to providing services starts with providing a trauma-sensitive environment. With interventions and evidence-based practices, children heal, develop self-regulation skills, learn, and experience success.

CCA addresses these challenges by:

• Providing access to affordable summer and school year programming and helping families around barriers like transportation, language, and accessing medical records. In addition, we extend office hours and travel to families’ homes and schools during enrollment periods.
• Supporting immigrant families unfamiliar with the program enrollment process
• Addressing summer learning loss through our curriculum and singe 5-week camp session, especially for children from low-income families
• Providing case management to support family’s needs to help kids get to camp, stay at camp, and thrive at camp
• Providing a trauma-sensitive care environment with trained professionals

CCA builds on its 125-year legacy to continue to increase our capacity and capabilities to meet the diverse and changing needs of the families and communities we serve. Our 17-member Board is engaged, committed and active in fundraising and governance. Our staff includes a camp founder/director of 30 years who specializes in trauma-sensitive care for kids with special needs; our executive director has over 25 years’ experience leading nonprofits through growth and change, and our reputation in the community is well known and is held in high regard. We have support from the City, the State, dozens of foundations, and hundreds of loyal and long-term donors. As a small non-profit, we remain creative, innovative, nimble and able to pivot quickly when responding to local, regional and even national trends and needs.

In recognition of CCA’s unique community service - much needed access to affordable summer programming for low-income youth and their families – we have been commended by the Cambridge City Council and praised by Cambridge Public School personnel, community leaders, and experts in the field of trauma. Nancy Rappaport, M.D, author of The Behavior Code and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard University states, "[CCA] is an astounding place that provides a safe haven and a caring environment allowing children to heal from trauma. This is a camp that builds children's social skills and sense of joy.” For the past decade, the Cambridge Public School Department has selected Daybreak, our special needs program, as the primary provider of summer services for students in our community with the most severe therapeutic needs. The Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH) has also chosen CCA as a provider.

In 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 CCA was chosen by CambridgeSide Mall to be the sole beneficiary of Cambridge’s only half-marathon, upon recommendation from the of City of Cambridge. CCA has also received three proclamations from the City’s mayor and its counsellors, and in 2015 we were the recipient of the prestigious $100,000 Cummings Foundation Grant.

CCA is focused on continually improving and growing the programming we provide to address the unmet needs of our camper population. The dimensions we closely monitor are program capacity, program quality and efficacy, continuity of services, and state-of-the-art neurological research. With intentionality, we work to ensure our camp environment and the programs we provide are of maximum benefit to our campers and staff.

After a recent increase in the number of youth we serve annually and the addition of two new programs and a very successful 125th birthday celebration, CCA is embarking on a strategic planning process to map out the next 5 years for programming, infrastructure, and outcomes.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve children from urban, under-resourced circumstances, especially children impacted by trauma and/or disability, in supportive and inclusive summer-day-camp and out-of-school time communities.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We bought and have been designing an online registration software so families can enroll and pay remotely.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We have informal conversations with camp alumni; we have camp alumni who now serve as members of our Board; and collectively, this has influenced our decision to hire camp directors who share lived experience with the children and youth we serve.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Cambridge Camping Association, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Cambridge Camping Association, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 12/19/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Sonia Turek

Community Member

Term: 2021 - 2024


Board co-chair

Mr. Dave Wood

Compass Real Estate

Term: 2021 - 2024

Sonia Turek

Community Member

Dave Wood

Compass Real Estate

Michael Callaghan

Financial Analyst, WinnCompanies

Annie Bonney

Community Member

Catherine Brady

Nonprofit Bookkeeper

Matthew Curtis

Real Estate Investor

Sara DeSimone

Director, Conviction Integrity Unit, Middlesex County D.A.'s Office

Leo Gayne

AVP, East Cambridge Savings Bank

Susanna Jacobus

Biostatician, Dana Farber Cancer Institute

Carmelle Philippe

Special Ed Teacher

Kim Ridley

Head of School, Fayerweather Street School

Andrew Spooner

Coordinator, Macro Practice Field Education, B.U. School of Social Work

Ginny Berkowitz

Community Member

Jimena Canales

Writer and Community Member

Manua Heath

Senior Philanthropic Advisor, Cure Alzheimers Fund

Rachel Louis-Hamilton

Director of Regulatory Affairs, Road Scholar

Caroline Moreno

Membership Director, Boys and Girls Club of Boston

Melissa Petit Homme

Caregiver, Sevita

Josiane Ribassi-Houle

Assistant Branch Manager, Cambridge Savings Bank

Thalia Scurlock

Annual Fund and Prospect Manager, CSF

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/19/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/19/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.