Connecticut Food Bank

On the move toward a hunger free Connecticut

Wallingford, CT   |  http://www.ctfoodbank.org

Mission

The mission of Connecticut Food Bank is to provide nutritious food to people in need. We do this by supplying food products to our member agencies, as well as through direct food distribution programs and by promoting public awareness about the problem of hunger.

Ruling year info

1982

President & CEO

Jason Jakubowski

Main address

2 Research Parkway

Wallingford, CT 06492 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

06-1063025

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (W01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Nearly 400,000 people across our six county service area in Connecticut; Fairfield, New Haven, New London, Litchfield, Middlesex and Windham counties -- 1 in 6 people, and 1 in 4 children -- struggle with hunger every month. Connecticut Food Bank and its network of member feeding programs serve populations that are at risk of hunger and, according to the USDA are food-insecure. The USDA uses the phrase “food-insecurity” to describe a lack of consistent access to adequate amounts of food for an active, healthy life. Food-insecure populations include people unable to provide basic needs for their households because of economic and transportation barriers. The food we distribute helps; households whose income is not sufficient to feed their families, seniors on fixed incomes, and individuals who struggle economically to obtain the nutrition they need and to provide more consistency in meals, every day.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Feeding the Hungry

Connecticut Food Bank is the state's largest centralized provider of emergency hunger relief, distributing 27 million pounds of food annually – enough to provide more than 22.5 million meals – across six of the state's eight counties: Fairfield, Litchfield, Middlesex, New Haven, New London, and Windham. Connecticut Food Bank is a member of Feeding America, the nation’s largest hunger-relief organization comprised of a network of 200 food banks. As a member of the Feeding America network, Connecticut Food Bank leverages national, regional and local partnerships to obtain bulk donations of nutritious food for nearly 400,000 projected residents at risk of hunger in our service area. Connecticut Food Bank distributes food in two ways - through a network of partner member agencies who serve people in their community, and through direct to client service programs. Our network of partner member agencies includes food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, residential programs, senior and veteran centers, and day programs for low-income adults and children. Direct service programs - such as the Mobile Pantry - provide food-insecure people of all ages with healthy food and resources. Since its incorporation as the state’s first regional food bank more than 37 years ago, Connecticut Food Bank has distributed nearly 390 million pounds of food to thousands of residents at risk of hunger.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

Connecticut Food Bank promotes Hunger Awareness by working with regional and national anti-hunger
advocates and with local food policy councils in an ongoing effort to raise
awareness about hunger in Connecticut.  We work to build partnerships with legislators, donors, member
agencies, and communities through events and educational opportunities, including: Hunger Action Awareness Month, live and virtual food drives, and our Hunger 101 program. Hunger 101 gives people a taste of what food insecurity—or hunger—really is. Participants walk in someone else’s shoes and see firsthand what it’s like to struggle with poverty and food insecurity in Connecticut. Hunger 101 captures the daily stress of hunger as participants learn how to feed a family for a day with no or limited resources.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Mobile Pantry Program removes transportation barriers that make it difficult for food-insecure households to obtain fresh food and the nutrition they need. The Mobile Pantry truck brings fresh produce and healthy perishable groceries directly to low-income neighborhoods and areas with poor supermarket access and limited vehicle availability. The goal of the Mobile Pantry is to increase the amount of nutritious food – such as fruits and vegetables, low-fat dairy items, and whole grains – made available to underserved communities that may otherwise have limited access to fresh, healthy food. Monthly Mobile Pantry distributions provide hungry households with a consistent supply of nutritious food items at no cost. As a result, food-insecure household members experience less hunger, improved nutrition and improved health outcomes.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Feeding the Hungry

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of food donation partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Feeding the Hungry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Feeding the Hungry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

pounds of food distributed

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We seek to alleviate hunger by providing nutritious food to people in need and to raise awareness of the challenges facing food-insecure people in Connecticut.

We do this by working with financial donors, food industry partners, volunteers and a network of community-based hunger relief programs and human service organizations to distribute food and to support coordinated hunger awareness efforts.

Through a combination of national, regional, and local partnerships, Connecticut Food Bank acquires and distributes nutritious food to people in need. Connecticut Food Bank works in partnership with New England region food banks and with Feeding America, the nation's leading hunger relief charity, to secure bulk donations of food and fresh produce from national manufacturers, wholesalers, food industry associations, and the United States Department of Agriculture. Food donations are also supplied by local retailers and farmers through the Food Bank’s Retail Store Donation Program and Farm-to-Pantry Program, which supply Connectictu Food Bank and its member agencies with fresh produce and retail food donations.
Connecticut Food Bank also receives funding from The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), a federal program that helps provide emergency food and nutrition assistance at no cost for low-income households. Connecticut Food Bank contracts with the State of Connecticut to distribute TEFAP commodities in its service area. The Connecticut Department of Social Services contracts with Connecticut Food Bank to distribute food throughout the state through the State Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SSNAP or CTNAP). Connecticut Food Bank purchases high protein items and other nutritionally beneficial supplemental foods under this program for distribution to eligible feeding programs. Connecticut Food Bank purchases food for othoer sources to supplement our food supply chain when needed.
Direct-to-client programs include; The Mobile Pantry, Pop-up Pantries (both drive-through and walk-up), the Dairy Express fresh milk program and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) senior box.

Connecticut Food Bank provides the bulk of the food that it acquires to a network of around 600 community-based food-assistance programs including; outreach partners, affiliate distribution centers and member programs such as food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, qualified residential programs, and day programs that serve low-income families, elderly and youth.
Connecticut Food Bank distributes food through our centralized distribution Center in Wallingford and transports food with a fleet of 15 vehicles, including customized refrigerated mobile distribution trucks and vans, tractor trailers and box trucks that bring food directly to residents of low-income neighborhoods.
Connecticut Food Bank employs 57 staff members, and has a pool of more than 6,000 volunteers who help us carry out our mission to supply nutritious food to people in need.

Last fiscal year ending June 30, 2020, we distributed over 28 million pounds of food, through more than 600 food access points, serving over 148,000 people each month, and feeding them the equivalent of 23,333,333 meals during the fiscal year.
We procure food when available to us through local, regional and national food supply channels and through food donations. Our costs to purchase food have increased, as the supply chain has become more challenging to navigate as a result of COVID-19. We have seen the need in our service are increase over 40% - from 275,000 individuals to nearly 400,000 individuals who are now food insecure. Many of the people who are in need of food assistance are using our food safety net support for the first time.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Connecticut Food Bank conducted virtual Town Hall Zoom meetings for select member agencies in September to gather feedback on their experiences serving clients during COVID.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Connecticut Food Bank
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Connecticut Food Bank

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Beth Henry

Cigna

Arlene Putterman

The Stop & Shop Supermarket Company

Norman LaCroix

Decision Analytics Group

Jenny Chou

Wiggin and Dana LLP

Kristen Cooksey Stowers

UCONN Rudd Center

Alfred Watts

Cornerstone Christian Center

Harry Garafalo

Garafalo Markets LLC

Heather Smith-Jaser

Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte & Sterczala P.C.

Wendy Wahl

Aetna

Diana Zhang

Bridgewater Associates

Mitch Podob

Swarovski

Max Barry

Aetna

Wesley Higgins

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data