African American Planning Commission, Inc.

Building Our Community and Yours... One Block, One Family At A Time.

Brooklyn, NY   |  https://aapci.org

Mission

The African American Planning Commission Inc. ("AAPCI"), is a New York City-based 501(c)(3), nonprofit organization committed to addressing homelessness and the related issues of domestic violence, HIV/AIDS, shortage of affordable housing, and unemployment in the communities in which we live and serve.

Notes from the nonprofit

JOB OPENINGS: At any time, the African American Planning Commission may have a number of job openings in a variety of settings ranging from entry-level jobs, to management and professional positions, to contract assignments. If you have the skills, education, passion to serve others, and think your qualifications are a great match for any of our current job openings, please forward your resume along with a cover letter (indicating which position you are applying for) to our Human Resource Department. All Agency-wide job vacancies are also posted at: https://jobwarehouse.org. AAPCI is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer (EEOE).

Ruling year info

1996

CEO

Mr Matthew Okebiyi

Main address

630 Flushing Avenue 3rd Floor, Suite 316

Brooklyn, NY 11206 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

11-3305070

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The need is to address the shortage of low-income, affordable and supportive housing for all New Yorkers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Serenity House Family Residence

Serenity House Family Residence ("Serenity House") is the African American Planning Commission’s transitional (Tier II) housing program for homeless survivors of domestic violence and their children.

Serenity House officially opened its doors on February 1, 2005 as a place of refuge for homeless survivors of domestic violence who have exceeded their maximum length of stay (90 days) in an emergency shelter. Serenity House is one of the largest transitional (Tier II) domestic violence shelters in Brooklyn, New York.

The mission of Serenity House is to offer survivors and their minor children, a safe but temporary haven in which to pick up the pieces of their shattered lives. The secondary goal of Serenity House is to prepare families for independent living, assist them in locating permanent housing within or outside the State of New York, and to offer a host of on- and off-site supportive services that will help empower victims and minimize the root causes of domestic violence.

Serenity House offers survivors (regardless of gender, race, culture, religion, ethnic background, or sexual preference) the opportunity to reside in a secured environment for up to six months or more, as needed. The program is culturally sensitive to allow families to feel immediately at home and to foster ethnic pride in children and family members. Serenity House is able to accommodate families including those with adolescent males and male head-of-household.

Social support services offered include:

• Counseling services,
• Housing search assistance,
• Vocational enrollment,
• Job search assistance,
• Basic computer skills classes,
• Professional Development: resume writing, budgeting
• On-site self-help programs,
• Independent living skills training,
• Healthcare referrals and follow-up services,
• Educational classes on issues such as breast cancer, nutrition, HIV/AIDS, and overall family health,
• Linkage and referrals to a wide array of community-based service providers including: NYC Board of Education, NYC Police Department, NYC Department of Homeless Services, NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation,
• Formal and informal relationships with community-based childcare and service providers.
• Resident issues and concerns are brought to the attention of management by various means, including through anonymous reporting, self-reporting, or during case management intervention. Monthly house meetings are conducted in an atmosphere that allows resident concerns to be addressed by management and to bring about swift resolutions.

Population(s) Served
Families
Parents

The mission of AAPCI’s Emergency Shelter and Social Services in Commercial Hotel program is to provide safe transitional shelter with the goal of moving all clients out of shelter and helping them locate permanent and/or alternate housing within or outside the State of New York while maintaining their employment status. Our methodology is to offer on- and off-site supportive case management, employment and housing services that empower clients and reduces recidivism.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Opened on June 30, 2017 and funded by the New York City Human Resources Administration (“HRA”), the Renee Steedley Family Residence is a transitional Tier II domestic violence shelter. The mission of the Renee Steedley Family Residence is to offer survivors and their minor children, a safe but temporary haven in which to pick up the pieces of their shattered lives. The secondary goal of the Renee Steedley Family Residence is to prepare families for independent living, assist them in locating permanent housing within or outside the State of New York, and to offer a host of on- and off-site supportive services that will help empower victims and minimize the root causes of domestic violence.

The Renee Steedley Family Residence offers survivors (regardless of gender, race, culture, religion, ethnic background, or sexual preference) the opportunity to reside in a secured environment for up to six months or more, as needed. The program is culturally sensitive to allow families to feel immediately at home and to foster ethnic pride in children and family members. The Renee Steedley Family Residence is able to accommodate families including those with adolescent children, up to eighteen years of age, and male head-of-household.

The Renee Steedley Family Residence provides temporary accommodations with on-site social services to 54 homeless parents. During their stay, each family is housed in a furnished studio, one or two bedroom, fully furnished apartment, depending upon family configuration. All applicants are domestic violence survivors with children and reside outside of the Renee Steedley Family Residence catchment area. All families have access to onsite social services that address the psychological and concrete causes and effects of domestic violence, homelessness and unemployment.

During their time-limited length of stay (normally no more than six months), residents are educated on family safety, non-violent relationship choices, economic self-sufficiency, and finding and maintaining permanent housing.

Referrals to the shelter come via the NYC Human Resources Administration after a family has exceeded their maximum length of stay (90 days) in an emergency domestic violence shelter.

On-site services and programs include:

• Family case management,
• Individual and group counseling,
• Housing search assistance,
• Legal advocacy,
• Vocational counseling,
• Social & recreational activities,
• Domestic violence support groups for adults and children,
• Information and referral,
• Community outreach and education on the impact of domestic violence,
• Independent living skills workshops,
• Parenting classes,
• Onsite child care,
• After school program,
• Youth and age-appropriate services,
• Housing search assistance and follow-up after care services,

Eventually, through self-discipline and self-reliance, families are expected to move into permanent housing.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

The DOVE Program serves victims of physical and sexual assault, domestic violence and elder abuse. DOVE staff and volunteers provide support and invaluable information about resources available to them. They accompany victims during their stay in the emergency department, a time when the victim is at her/his most vulnerable, a time when she/he may feel alone, frightened, ashamed and unsure of what has happened to her/him and help him/her to cope with the violence and decide what her/his next steps may be. Program staff and volunteers provide these services free of charge.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The goal of Edwin’s Place is to meet the immediate and long term housing needs of low-income working families and single adults from the underserved neighborhood of Brownsville/East New York, as well as the housing needs of special needs homeless families and single adult New Yorkers living with HIV/AIDS, mental health disorders, and chronic histories of substance abuse who seek affordable, permanent supportive housing with onsite daily supportive services. The target population includes formerly homeless Vets.

As the onsite provider of social services at Edwin's Place, AAPCI's social work staff provide a host of onsite services including:

• independent rental apartment units,
• case management services,
• referral to community medical, mental health counseling,
• substance abuse counseling,
• Individual and group counseling,
• peer support groups,
• empowerment and life enrichment classes,
• youth services,
• parenting skills development,
• entitlement and financial advocacy, and much, much more…

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families
People with HIV/AIDS
Chronically ill people
Substance abusers

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

African American Planning Commission has partnered with for-profit housing developers, community stakeholders, and local government agencies to develop affordable and supportive housing in some of the neediest communities in New York City.

African American Planning Commission has partnered with for-profit housing developers and local government housing development agencies to develop low-income, rental housing and supportive housing for special needs homeless populations and other individuals. African American planning Commission will serve as the onsite provider of social services upon construction completion.

African American Planning Commission has many years in the provision of services to special needs homeless populations including survivors of domestic violence, very low-income working populations, and special needs homeless adults.

The New York city Department of City Planning recently certified the development of our proposed 233-unit, mixed-use low-income affordable and supportive housing project in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn in April 2021. We are gearing up for the ULURP process.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

African American Planning Commission, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

African American Planning Commission, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 5/27/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Walter Campbell

Stephen Atkins

Qneensborough Community College

Onyekwere Onwumere

College of New Rochelle

Stephen Redenti, Ph.D.

Lehman College

Julius Nwosu

Morris Heights Health Center

Alexandra Phanord

Verizon

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/28/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data