PLATINUM2022

LatinoJustice PRLDEF

Champions of Civil and Human Rights

aka Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund   |   New York, NY   |  http://www.latinojustice.org

Mission

LatinoJustice works to create a more just society by using and challenging the rule of law to secure transformative, equitable and accessible justice, by empowering our community and by fostering leadership through advocacy and education. LatinoJustice PRLDEF engages in impact litigation, legal advocacy, community engagement, and legal pipeline education programs. Our work is currently focused on five pillars: criminal justice reform; economic justice; immigrants' rights; voting rights; and leadership development.

Ruling year info

1972

President & General Counsel

Ms. Lourdes Rosado

Main address

475 Riverside Drive, Suite 1901

New York, NY 10115 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Puerto Rican Legal Defense & Education Fund

EIN

13-2722664

NTEE code info

Immigrants' Rights (R21)

Employee & Workers' Rights (R29)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Latinx in the United States have been subject, for many decades, to discriminatory laws, practices and views that have greatly suppressed their ability to live, work and engage in civic processes safely and successfully. Their human and civil rights have been curtailed both systemically and practically through a variety of tactics. Among the characteristics of the discrimination and abuses that have been used to undermine the rights of Latinx are: discriminatory local and national laws and policies premised on racial and ethnic profiling; language access barriers; illegal vote suppression; excessive policing; anti-immigrant ordinances; housing, education and employment discrimination; and much more. As a result, Latinx have had great difficulty in achieving equity of opportunity and success.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Human and Civil Rights Impact Litigation and Legal Advocacy

LatinoJustice PRLDEF's Legal Division develops and implements litigation strategies and legal advocacy work to protect the civil and human rights of Latinos throughout the United States. This includes taking on litigation that will ensure the rights of tens of thousands of Latinx across a range of issues, including immigrant, economic and criminal justice as well as educational and voting rights. Our work also involves providing legal advocacy and education to help Latinx communities on their rights and legal recourse. We work with community based organizations, community groups and individuals to ensure that we provide a legal lens and strategy to critical social justice issues impacting Latinx today. The work covers all of our programmatic pillars, including: Voting rights, criminal justice reform, immigrants' rights, economic justice, and education.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Immigrants and migrants

Reenvision Justicia is dedicated to promoting fairness, rights restoration and safety in the criminal justice system by using litigation, advocacy, community engagement, policy analysis and narrative change to make the invisible, visible to all - the concomitant plight of Latinos under a broken and racialized criminal justice system in America. Our program focuses on decarceration, rights restoration, policing, sentencing, bail and drug policy reform.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
People of Latin American descent
Multiracial people
Immigrants
Victims of crime and abuse

The Cesar A. Perales (CAP) Leadership Institute embodies three of LatinoJustice PRLDEF’s long-term guiding principles: preparing Latinas and Latinos for law school, cultivating Latino leaders and increasing civic participation. CAP nurtures young Latinos by empowering them to become change makers in their communities today by exposing them to the challenging civil rights issues that we face every day. We accomplish this by providing them with a continuum of comprehensive services: legal education programs, leadership and professional development, volunteer opportunities at LatinoJustice PRLDEF, and tools to support their growth into the transformative leaders of tomorrow.

Population(s) Served
Students
People of Latin American descent

[email protected] AT WORK(LAW) seeks to defend the rights of low-wage Latina immigrant workers who are vulnerable to exploitation in the workplace. Unscrupulous employers too often take advantage of Latina immigrants by paying them less than minimum wage, failing to pay them overtime, threatening exposure to immigration authorities, and firing them for attempting to assert their most basic rights. Even worse, sexual harassment is rampant in the low-wage workplace, and many Latina immigrant workers see such harassment as a byproduct of their work and status.

LAW works to educate low-wage Latina workers, their employers, advocates and the general community about the legal rights and protections that Latina workers can assert in the workplace, and we use our legal resources to effectively protect and defend these rights.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Women and girls

Our Latino Immigrant Justice Project aims to create a legal environment that permits all Latinos to enjoy the same civil liberties hard won by earlier waves of immigrants. Most of all, our goal is to put Latinos on an equal footing in the labor, political and cultural life of the nation, rather than allowing indifference --or worse--to contribute to their becoming a permanent underclass. We carry out legal advocacy and litigation and community engagement work to defend the civil and human rights of Latino immigrants and their families.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
People of Latin American descent

We protect and defend the right of Latinos to exercise voting rights by addressing vote denial practices (e.g., bilingual assistance, discriminatory purges and voter ID laws) and vote dilution schemes (e.g., at-large election structures, regionalization of over-populated districts and unfair redistricting plans.) The goal is to ensure equal access to the franchise for Latino populations as a way to address and combat legislative initiatives that impede their progress as contributing members to society. LJP uses the tools of impact litigation advocacy and pre-litigation work, as well as community engagement and partnerships to advance our project.

In 2016, LJP developed the Cada Voto Cuenta (CVC - Every Vote Counts) election monitoring project – a response to discrimination and voter suppression. CVC works by mobilizing trained nonpartisan volunteers to monitor polling sites.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Community Trailblazer 2020

Dominican Bar Associaton

Affiliations & memberships

National Hispanic Leadership Agenda Member 2022

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Numbered of staff who are satisfied to be an employee of the institution

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Immigrants, Undocumented immigrants, Migrant workers, Incarcerated people

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Employee satisfaction is gauged through annual organizational development activities and assessment of our work and issue pillars. Results inform organizational priorities, goals and activities.

Number of students receiving personal instruction and feedback about their performance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Ethnic and racial groups, People of Latin American descent

Related Program

CAP Leadership Institute

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our CAP Leadership Institute staff provides direct guidance, mentoring and instruction to individual students considering, pursuing and attending law school.

Number of mentors recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Young adults, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

CAP Leadership Institute

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

LatinoJustice recruits young professionals to serve as mentors for aspiring law students currently in high school, undergraduate or graduate school through its Next Generation Lideres program.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed knowledge about occupations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Young adults, People of Latin American descent

Related Program

CAP Leadership Institute

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Through various legal pipeline programs, students are prepared to pursue education related to legal careers. Part of the program is to teach students about the range and potential for legal careers.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

LatinoJustice seeks to ensure and defend the human and civil rights of all Latinx people and communities. Within that context, we seek to remove barriers and obstacles to Latinos and Latinas exercising their rights and freedoms both within the United States and beyond. LatinoJustice aims to increase access to housing, education, employment, community and civic engagement, and the vote for all Latinx living in the United States. We also seek to protect and defend Latinx from discrimination, hate crimes, excessive and unjust policing and criminal justice policies, and other attempts to diminish or suppress their human and civil rights.

LatinoJustice employs litigation, legal advocacy, leadership training and civic engagement activities to remove barriers that compromise Latinx civil rights and to equip Latinx communities with the knowledge, skills and confidence to become active members of the community. We take on cases, representing classes of people whose rights have been violated or denied, and our victories have an impact on hundreds of thousands, even millions of Latinx and other oppressed communities. For example, on Long Island we represented a group of Latina immigrant workers whose employer had been sexually harassing them and threatening to report them to ICE. We successfully won a settlement award for the workers, and this serves as a deterrent to that and other employers who are now aware of the consequences for their unlawful practices. Our education, pipeline and leadership development activities have resulted in thousands of Latinx joining the ranks of lawyers and helping to effect positive change.

LatinoJustice has a long record of achievement in the area of civil rights, with precedent-setting legal victories from the 1970s to today. Our legal staff is comprised of highly experienced and dedicated civil rights attorneys, trained and mentored by our network of legal champions. Among our staff are constitutional law experts, internationally-respected human rights attorneys, culturally-competent, multi-lingual advocates and community leaders who form a cadre of professionals whose record of achievement in defending the rights of Latinx to vote, work, learn and live without discrimination or fear is impressive. Our victories in the areas of voting rights, immigrant justice, economic justice and more have paved the way for our peer legal defense groups to continue to mount legal challenges in the face of renewed hate-based laws being perpetuated by our current anti-immigrant climate. Likewise, our decades of fostering Latinx leadership is supported by deep expertise and commitment.

LatinoJustice has a lengthy list of accomplishments that run the gamut from securing bilingual ballots for Spanish-speaking voters and eliminating height requirements for NYC government employment candidates to defending Latinx immigrants from unlawful ICE raids and helping thousands of Latinx realize the dream of becoming a lawyer. The civil and human rights landscape is very different from that which we confronted in 1972 when the organization was founded, but some of our battles retain the same fundamental DNA. We have fought and won against many attempts in this country to limit the well-being and power of communities of color. There is still work to be done and the swell of bigotry and hatred coming from the federal administration has created new challenges but every victory we achieve ensures that we are successful in defending the principles of democracy, justice, equality and liberty.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    After conducting national and state-based surveys with our targeted population, we more specifically focused our narrative change work in our criminal justice reform pillar to provide more nuanced context to the communities we are trying to engage and mobilize to support criminal justice reform.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

LatinoJustice PRLDEF
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

LatinoJustice PRLDEF

Board of directors
as of 02/25/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Jose Ramon Gonzalez

Equitable Holdings

Term: 2020 - 2022

Ernest Ceberio

PGIM

Javier Alvarez

Ankura Consulting

Ricardo Anzaldua

Retired

Fernando Bohorquez

BakerHostetler

Diana Correa-Cintron

SuperDVille Inc.

Michelle Davila

Franklin Templeton Investments

Mauricio Espana

Dechert LLP

Claudia Marmolejo

Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC

Steven Mendez

PwC Switzerland

Jaime Mercado

Simpson Thacher & Bartlett

Ricardo Oquendo

Oquendo Deraco PLLC

Eridania Perez

Kennedy's Law

Pilar Ramos

Univision

Lida Rodriguez-Taseff

Opa-Locka Community Development Corp.

Ronald Tabak

Skaddden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom

Cid Wilson

Hispanic Association on Corporate Respnsibility

Marisol Rubecindo

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Roberto Concepcion

WeWork

Ernesto Palomo

Locke Lord LLP

Maria Melendez

Sidley Austin LLP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/20/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/20/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.