Center for Urban Community Services, Inc.

Building Brighter Futures

aka CUCS   |   New York, NY   |  http://www.cucs.org

Mission

CUCS helps people rise from poverty, exit homelessness, and be healthy. It excels at developing affordable housing and providing programs that link housing, health and social services for low-income individuals and families. Each year more than 56,000 are served by CUCS.

Ruling year info

1993

President and Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Joseph DeGenova

Main address

198 East 121st Street 6th Floor

New York, NY 10035 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3687891

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The impacts of even short bouts of homelessness are wide-reaching and varied. Individuals who have experienced homelessness are 3-4 times more likely to die prematurely than the general public and a disproportionate number of homeless individuals suffer from mental illness. Furthermore, untreated mental illnesses can significantly disrupt a person's ability to carry out essential aspects of daily life and can prevent them from forming or sustaining stable relationships that are critical to maintaining housing. Once housed, individuals with histories of homelessness and mental or physical illness often need additional support to help them thrive in their communities. CUCS uses a combination of critical services to address both the causes and effects of homelessness for individuals and families. In New York City more than 63,000 adults and children are homeless every night and more than 130,000 unique individuals sleep in the shelter system every year.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Outreach

CUCS leads the efforts to reduce street homelessness in Manhattan through a triad of housing, psychiatric and medical services. In 2017 CUCS was awarded a three-year contract with the New York City Department of Homeless Services to oversee all outreach and housing placement services for men and women living on the streets of Manhattan.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Homeless people

Permanent Supportive Housing is a hallmark of CUCS’ programming. CUCS provides supportive housing services to 2,500 individuals and families living with serious mental illness and other disabilities through its supportive housing residences and social service partnerships in Manhattan, the Bronx, and Brooklyn.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Care Management Program and health home services help individuals with chronic health and serious mental health issues access all of the services they need to stay healthy and remain out of the hospital. CUCS is currently working to coordinate health care services for approximately 900 high-cost Medicaid users in Manhattan and Brooklyn.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Career Network helps individuals find and keep living wage jobs. Employment Specialists collaborate with clients to create individualized job-readiness plans to secure employment and provide ongoing support to help them maintain employment.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Single Stop programs offer free assistance to low-income individuals, families, and veterans to ensure their stability in an efficient, cost- effective model of coordinated service delivery. In 2014, the programs helped 9,000 households to acquire legal assistance, health benefits, unemployment insurance, food stamps, and other entitlement benefits.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

The Housing Resource Center provides assistance and information about housing opportunities to approximately 15,000 individuals and agencies annually. It publishes a bi-weekly vacancy newsletter that serves as New York City’s only centralized source for vacancies and administers the Reentry Coordination System to manage the supportive housing units for soon to be released mentally ill inmates.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Janian Medical Care is our award-winning health care program. Established in 2011, Janian delivers a matrix of psychiatric and primary medical care services to homeless and formerly homeless individuals throughout New York City.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Homeless people

CUCS launched New York City's first street medicine program in 2016. Janian Medical Care (Janian) providers bring medical care to homeless individuals on park benches, street corners, underpasses, and anywhere necessary.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Homeless people

CUCS's transitional housing programs, located in Manhattan, Bronx and Brooklyn provide safe haven, housing placement services, case management and primary medical and psychiatric care to homeless individuals.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

The Training Institute and Academy for Justice Informed Practice are leaders in the training of professionals in the human service, behavioral health and judicial sectors. CUCS provides a broad spectrum of trainings to more than 15,000 individuals annually throughout New York City and nation-wide.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2021 CUCS continued to provide services despite restrictions on face-to-face interactions due to the pandemic.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CUCS's Street Outreach and Transitional Housing serve individuals who are street homeless and those who are in the process of moving from the streets and into permanent housing.

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Janian Medical Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CUCS's signature health care program, Janian Medical Care, provides psychiatric services in for street homeless individuals, in housing and at more than 50 community sites across New York City.

Number of people in the area with access to affordable housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Permanent Supportive Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Academics, Emergency responders

Related Program

Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of homeless participants engaged in mental health services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Chronically ill people

Related Program

Janian Medical Care

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CUCS aims to help people rise from poverty, exit homelessness, and be healthy. It works to develop affordable housing and provide programs that link housing, health and social services for homeless, formerly homeless, and low-income individuals and families. CUCS provides street outreach, transitional and supportive housing, health and wellness, training, and financial stability services to 50,000 people annually in New York City and nationally.

Three decades of working with homeless, formerly homeless, and low income individuals and families has given CUCS significant insight into the impact homelessness can have on a person's physical and mental health, as well as their ability to participate in a new community. These insights have informed the strategies CUCS uses to address homelessness and its effects in New York City and nationally.

Moving people out of homelessness and into housing is at the core of what CUCS does. CUCS is utilizing a strategic campaign to reduce street homelessness across Manhattan. To address the challenge of street homelessness, CUCS has brought together outreach workers, psychiatrists and medical professionals to engage street homeless individuals, work closely with them, and move them into permanent housing.

Widely credited with being a founder of the supportive housing model, CUCS opened New York City's first supportive housing site in 1983. Its housing programs provide wraparound services, including case management, on-site medical and psychiatric care, supported employment and benefits counseling to ensure that individuals and families who move into housing are well equipped to stay in housing.

CUCS's signature health care program, Janian Medical Care (Janian) has developed a matrix of psychiatric, primary medical, and street medicine services for homeless and formerly homeless individuals and families in New York City.

Janian is the largest provider of psychiatric care to homeless and formerly homeless people in New York, working in more than 50 community sites. The psychiatric care that Janian provides is a significant support for homeless and formerly homeless individuals but access to primary health care services for this population is not as widely available. To address and close this gap, Janian introduced primary medical care services for individuals living in transitional and supportive housing programs. Experienced nurse practitioners and case workers work together with patients to improve health outcomes for individuals who would benefit from integrated care.

Another important strategy is education and replication. In addition to direct services, CUCS's Training Institute and Academy for Justice-Informed Practice provide trainings about successful evidence-based practices to professionals in the behavioral health, human services, and judicial sectors both in New York and nationally. Trainings are presented on a wide range of topics including housing, homelessness, behavioral health, and case management and provide real-world, practical learning opportunities that can be implemented immediately.

The strength of CUCS's leadership and staff, including the administrative, fundraising, financial, and program leaders, is the agency's biggest asset. The capabilities the staff brings to the agency's many programs come from decades of experience in all facets of managing a successful nonprofit.

CUCS's leadership team brings decades of clinical, medical, and administrative experience to the agency. The leadership team meets on a monthly basis to strategize and guide the agency in both programmatic and administrative directions.

CUCS's Board of Directors is comprised of both non-profit and for-profit industry leaders in fields including real estate, housing, education, and healthcare. The Board is actively involved in ensuring the financial health of the agency. The Board's Committees, including the Audit, Executive, Housing, and Personnel Committees, participate in active discussions and the decision making process regarding the strategic direction of the agency.

In addition, CUCS brings together a network of partners, leaders, and professionals, including community boards, city council members, food banks, substance abuse treatment centers, and religious organizations, to address the challenges of homelessness across the city.

CUCS has been providing critical services to New Yorkers since 1983 when the agency opened New York City's first mixed supportive housing program. Since then CUCS has continued to develop affordable housing and provide integrated programs that link housing, health and social services for New York's homeless and most vulnerable people.

In the last few years CUCS has introduced and expanded a number of programs that have made a significant impact on New York City and as a result, 50,000 people are served annually in the agency's street outreach, housing, wellness, financial stability, and training programs.

CUCS's signature health care program, Janian Medical Care (Janian) launched a primary medical care program in 2013 for people with complex health issues, offering appointments in on-site medical suites at transitional and supportive housing sites. CUCS also launched New York City's first street medicine program in 2016. Each day teams of medical professionals and social workers work together to provide compassionate medical care to homeless individuals on park benches, street corners, under bridges, and anywhere necessary.

In the coming year, CUCS will open a new drop-in center and safe haven in Manhattan to provide meals, showers, laundry facilities and housing placement services and transitional housing and begin providing supportive services at new permanent housing sites in the Brooklyn and the Bronx.

Other projects being launched soon include a second mobile medical van to supplement the Street Medicine Team's efforts to provide healthcare to street homeless individuals and expanded transitional and supportive housing sites for individuals and families in Manhattan and the Bronx.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Center for Urban Community Services, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Center for Urban Community Services, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/12/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Alex Rose

Crestview Partners

Term: 2017 -

Don D. Grubman, Esq.

Hahn & Hessen, LLP

Joe Weisbord

Angela Colasuonno

Credit Suisse

Alex Rose

Crestview Partners

Peggy DaSilva

Allianz

Julie Sandorf

Revson Foundation

Bradford Williams

Crestview Partners

Eduardo Alves

S&P Global

Justin Lee

Weursch & Gering

Georg Ettstaller

Credit Suisse

Ashley Smyth

Ted Weissberg

Jennifer McCool

WatermanCLARK

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/12/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data