ASSOCIATION OF COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS FOR THE HOMELESS INC

Empowering the Homeless, Improving Communities

aka ACE Programs for the Homeless   |   Long Island City, NY   |  https://www.acenewyork.org

Mission

ACE works with homeless men and women throughout New York City, providing job training, work experience and a lifetime support network to help our program participants achieve their goals and establish economic independence.

Ruling year info

1995

Executive Director

Mr. Jim Martin

Main address

30-30 Northern Blvd Suite B100

Long Island City, NY 11101 USA

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Formerly known as

A.C.E. Programs for the Homeless

The SoHo Partnership

The TriBeCa Partnership

EIN

13-3846431

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Vocational Rehabilitation (includes Job Training and Employment for Disabled and Elderly) (J30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

ACE is focused on alleviating the instance of homelessness and unemployment for those in need in New York City. As of August 27th, 2021, there are 45,000 individuals in the city shelter program (source: NYC Dept. of Homelessness), thousands more on the streets, and tens of thousands facing eviction.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Project Comeback

Project Comeback (PCB) helps men and women obtain the educational, interpersonal and technical skills needed in order to secure and retain full-time, permanent employment through the provision of adult education, industry-specific training, work experience, and a life-long support network. Participants attend the program five days per week; the average time for completion of PCB is three months. Participants graduate from PCB once they have secured full-time, permanent employment.

Program components include:

Adult Education: ACE’s adult education program provides contextualized literacy and math training, centered on vocational themes and crucial daily living skills. Participants’ educational needs are assessed using the CASAS ECS (Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System – Employability Competency System).

Paid Work Experience Training: ACE participants build recent work experience for their resumes, earn a wage and learn the rules and expectations of the workplace. Participants work closely with site supervisors, who coach them in positive workplace habits. Work experience opportunities are provided in partnership with the NYC Department of Transportation’s “One NYC Plaza Equity Program”, and provide essential services to public plazas in high-need areas, creating vibrant spaces while giving back to the community.

Industry Specific Training: ACE offers OSHA 30-Hour Construction Safety, OSHA 10-Hour General Industry Training, OSHA 10-Hour Construction Safety Training, OSHA Supported Scaffold User Training, OSHA Flagger Training, Custodial Maintenance Certification, Food Protection Certification, and Forklift Training.

Soft-Skills Training: ACE’s soft-skills courses develop interpersonal skills, enhance job-seeking skills, and prepare participants for the transition to self-sufficiency. Our courses and workshops cover topics like interviewing techniques, how to maintain employment, transitioning off of public benefits, researching healthcare options and creating a housing plan.

Individualized Counseling: Participants receive one-on-one counseling from a Rehabilitation Counselor to address their unique needs and work through barriers to employment.

Job Placement Assistance: ACE’s Job Developer assists participants in finding employment and works closely with work experience supervisors and case managers to understand each participant’s strengths and barriers, then matches them with employment opportunities where they can succeed and excel.

Financial Literacy Curriculum: Designed in partnership with the Financial Clinic, this new curriculum is presented through a series of workshops focusing on three main areas: Assets (savings and spending plans), Banking, and Credit. Participants are provided the opportunity to work with a professional financial counselor, further empowering them with education and skills needed to achieve and sustain financial stability and independence.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Project Stay (PSY), our job retention and lifelong aftercare program, helps Project Comeback graduates retain employment, increase their earning power, and complete their transition to self-sufficiency. As soon as a PCB graduate secures full-time employment, they are enrolled in PSY. PSY consists of several components crucial to long-term success, including:

Monthly meetings where newly employed graduates receive support from their peers

Workshops on financial literacy, networking, leadership, business etiquette, conflict resolution, stress management, and work/life balance

Bi-monthly recreational outings to bring graduates together in a positive social setting and reward them for their hard work

Individualized support through on-site services and outside referrals, including assistance with accessing housing, healthcare, child-care services, educational opportunities, free tax preparation services, and addiction and mental health services

Scholarship opportunities to pursue educational goals and industry-specific certifications

Financial incentives for graduates who maintain employment.

PSY is unique among vocational aftercare programs in New York City, in that it provides life-long support for graduates to assist them in any challenges they meet down the road.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Extremely poor people, Low-income people, Ex-offenders, Unemployed people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

ACE served over 600 people in 2020 through our comprehensive and progressively phased programs, Project Comeback and Project Stay.

Number of clients still working after 12 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ex-offenders, Extremely poor people, Homeless people, Low-income people, Unemployed people

Related Program

Project Stay

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These numbers refer to the percentages of participants in each year cohort who remain employed after one year of employment.

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Extremely poor people, Homeless people, Low-income people, Ex-offenders, Unemployed people

Related Program

Project Comeback

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to Covid-19, ACE had to limit enrollment capacity in 2020. Despite the low enrollment figures, we served over 600 individuals through our aftercare program, Project Stay.

Total number of clients experiencing homelessness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Low-income people, Working poor, Ex-offenders, Unemployed people

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The numbers represent the percent of participants who reported being homeless at the time of enrollment into our programs.

Number of clients placed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ex-offenders, Unemployed people, Homeless people, Low-income people, Extremely poor people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These figures represent the number of participants who secured full-time employment. The 2020 figure also includes the number of graduates who secured new employment through Project Stay.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

ACE empowers New Yorker who have histories of homelessness, incarceration and substance use disorder with the skills they need to reach their goals of full-time employment, economic self-sufficiency and family reunification. Our goals are to help New Yorkers overcome the cycle of homelessness and poverty by securing and maintaining full-time employment and continuing to build their earning capacity through training and professional development. We measure our success by tracking the number of individuals who secure full-time employment through our program, their success in retaining their employment over two year, and their income over two years of employment.

ACE offers an ongoing enrollment, inviting individuals to join our program every week. We work with over 40 referral partners and agencies throughout New York City. Our strategy for reaching our goals are to provide relevant, contextualized education programs and work experience that adequately prepares individuals with a lacking employment history for the workforce. Two days per week, individuals in our program earn money through paid work experience where they clean and maintain public plazas throughout New York City. The other three days of programming per week, each participants take industry trainings, financial literacy and career readiness workshops, literacy and numeracy classes, computer proficiency classes, and meets with our in-house case managers and job developers to identify and act on job leads.

ACE has unique partnerships and extensive history in our field that makes us extremely capable at achieving successful outcomes in our field. At our headquarters, the ACE Center for Workforce Development, we have a full staff of teachers, case managers and field supervisors that administer our programs. Since 1992, we have developed and honed our programming based on client outcomes and feedback and best practices in the field of homelessness and workforce development. We have partnerships that allow us to offer paid work experience training and hire individuals in full-time supported employment positions. Our partnerships provide stability that allows us to focus on enhancing and improving our program offerings in real time.

ACE has empowered thousands of New Yorkers with the skills needed to secure and maintain full-time employment. In 2018, 66% of our participants secured full-time employment, 69% maintained employment for at least one-year, and 62% maintained employment for at least two years.

In the years to come we plan to continue to build our capacity to serve more individuals in need. We will expand our menu of industry trainings and offer even more opportunities for New York's most vulnerable citizens to build a career.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    ACE serves New York City’s most vulnerable and at-risk populations. ACE conducts outreach all over New York City at homeless shelters, community centers, substance use treatment centers, prisoner reentry programs, and alternative sentencing programs. We have a weekly, rolling intake process in which men and women can be referred from over 40 referral partner agencies located throughout all five boroughs, with new partnerships developing each year.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, We don't actively use collected feedback, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Based on participant feedback on a wellness survey, in 2021, We found through our feedback processes that our participants struggle to share positive information about themselves. In response we have added several new workshops to our curriculum that cover the topic of "identifying strengths".

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

ASSOCIATION OF COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS FOR THE HOMELESS INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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ASSOCIATION OF COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS FOR THE HOMELESS INC

Board of directors
as of 08/27/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Henry Buhl

No Affiliation

Stuart Epstein

Irvin Stern Foundation

Dick Robinson

Scholastic

Henry Buhl

No Affiliation

Jorge Iragorri

Morgan Stanley

Stephanie Rader

JP Morgan

Steven Rand

Apex Art

Catherine Rice

No Affiliation

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/27/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data