CHILDREN OF CHINA PEDIATRICS FOUNDATION-PSC-

Transforming Lives Through Medical Missions

aka CCPF   |   New York, NY   |  www.chinapediatrics.org

Mission

To care for children with disabilities in China’s orphanages by providing multi-specialty medical treatment, hands-on training and medical education. CCPF leads a team of all-volunteer doctors and nurses to China twice a year to provide free surgical and medical care to orphans; medical and clinical information and techniques to our Chinese colleagues, enabling the continuation of more advanced care after the CCPF team departs China; and medical and rehab training and education to Chinese doctors, orphanage workers, and foster care parents. CCPF has provided life-changing surgeries to over 600 orphans from all over China and has helped 100s more with non-surgical treatment. These services improve the children's quality of life and health, and increase their chances of being adopted.

Notes from the nonprofit

Gena Palumbo founded CCPF in 1998 following the adoption of her second child; a healthy baby girl from an orphanage in Nanjing, China. Ms. Palumbo was overjoyed and tremendously grateful for both of her daughters, but did not stop thinking about those left behind. She thought of the many children who would remain in orphanages due their special needs and/or medical problems. In many cases (e.g., cleft palate, eye problems) very minor surgeries would make an enormous difference in these children's lives and health, yet they were unlikely to ever receive care to treat their underlying conditions. In other cases, the children's conditions required very sophisticated procedures unavailable to these disenfranchised members of society. Knowing that proper medical care would enable them to walk, play, attend school or be adopted, Ms. Palumbo responded with a sense of urgency. She created an organization with one simple goal in mind: to provide the medical intervention that would improve the everyday lives of Chinese orphans with disabilities.

Since that time, CCPF has provided life-changing surgeries to over 600 orphans while hundreds more have been helped through non-surgical treatment plans as well as training to Chinese doctors. We have helped children from throughout China, some of whom traveled long distances over many days to receive our care. Every child's life has been changed for the better. Children who could not walk, now run; children who could not eat or smile are now thriving; some have been adopted and placed with permanent families both here and abroad.

Ruling year info

1998

President and Founder

Ms. Gena Palumbo

Medical Director

Dr. David P. Roye Jr.

Main address

Rockefeller Center Station PO Box 5594

New York, NY 10185 USA

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Formerly known as

Children of China Pediatrics Foundation

EIN

13-4014724

NTEE code info

Health - General and Rehabilitative N.E.C. (E99)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Professional Societies & Associations (B03)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Approximately 1 million children in China are born with a disability per year. Many of these children end up in an orphanage because families are not able to care for them, although some families opt to keep them even if they do not have the financial means to properly care for them. Many children have complex disabilities and need surgery and/or rehabilitation. In some cases, their condition is severe and local surgeons and rehab doctors/therapists/caregivers do not have the skills to treat them. In other cases, theses children are not being prioritized for proper medical treatment, orphanages do not have the training to provide the best care and indigent families simply cannot afford care and/or live far from a hospital. Many children can be relieved of extreme pain and discomfort with proper diagnoses and care, making it possible for them to be able to study and become educated adults, and/or increase their chances of being adopted.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Surgeries

CCPF treats any child that can benefit from a range of health issues, especially complex surgeries that are either unaffordable for orphanages and caregivers, or local surgeons do not have the expertise to perform. Many of the children have a history of failed procedures, which adds layers of complications to already complex procedures. CCPF surgeons and physicians – award-winning doctors from prestigious medical institutions – are able to provide high quality care in the areas of orthopedics, general, and plastic surgery, addressing a range of issues. The team often aligns crooked backs, repairs hernias, and fixes reproductive organs. General surgeries include urological repairs so children can use the bathroom on their own and live without pain. Plastic surgeons work on burn victims and other serious afflictions, as well as more common issues if needed. Orthopedic surgeries address complex problems related to cerebral palsy so that children can feed themselves or even run and play. CCPF is increasingly performing more complicated spine surgeries using the implantation of growing rods; a procedure our surgeons feel confident to perform with evident improvements in quality of post-operative care. Our rehabilitation team, comprised of the highest level of medical professionals, establishes post-op care programs for each child and trains their caregivers. Unlike most other medical organizations, CCPF returns for several years to the same hospitals to treat the same patients so that there is continuity and follow-up with the children. Often, they require multiple surgeries and evolving post-op care.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

In response to changing needs in orphan care, CCPF established the Spagnoletti Rehabilitation Program, led by CCPF's Dr. Heakyung Kim, one of the leading pediatric physiatrists in the United States. Dr. Kim is one of only 160 board certified pediatric rehabilitation specialists in the country using a multidisciplinary team in the practice of pediatric rehabilitation medicine. The program currently takes place at the Chengdu Welfare Institute, a well-equipped, clean, and bright facility home to over 600 orphans, 80% of whom have chronic disabilities, including 200 children with cerebral palsy. Though the children are well cared for by a loving staff, education and training for staff members is limited. Under Dr. Kim's leadership, our team of therapists, doctors, orthotists, and translators provides training, including lectures and hands-on demonstrations to the Institute's appreciative and receptive therapists, aides, and other caregivers who are now able to provide the latest and best care for these children. This ongoing program is important, as many children are not surgery candidates, and treatments must be fine-tuned based on the children's growth. If interventions are not made at the appropriate time complications can occur, while continuity of care is also critical. For example, as a child's bone continues to grow, something as simple as stiffness can prevent a muscle from keeping pace with the bone, resulting in a child losing their ability to walk. Accordingly, issues must be addressed based on the speed of the child’s growth. We hope the program in Chengdu will become the model for future programs throughout China.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Since 2003, CCPF has sponsored a Visiting Scholars Fellowship Program to provide additional training for Chinese surgeons and doctors. The program is designed to foster greater cultural understanding by bringing together American and Chinese medical professions while working to further CCPF’s reach. Doctors and medical administrators come to observe in the New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital’s – one of the nation’s top hospitals – to learn how a U.S. children’s hospital functions. During these 2-4 week programs, Fellows become immersed in the daily routine of our pediatric surgeons and other medical teams. By observing in the operating suites and clinics, shadowing surgeons during clinic hours, and attending medical conferences and lectures, the Chinese Fellows gain first-hand experience of our advanced medical practices as well as hospital management. Upon completion of the fellowships, these doctors further CCPF’s mission by providing surgery and other medical care without a fee for disabled orphans after they return to China. In addition, these opportunities build skills and relationships to help streamline the complicated preparation needed during CCPF’s mission trips to China, making our time there more efficient and allowing us to help more children.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children with disabilities receiving early intervention services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children, Adolescents, Preteens, People with physical disabilities

Related Program

Rehabilitation Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These results are an estimate, as we can not ascertain the exact number of children who are receiving the intervention. CCPF trains orphanage rehab therapists who then apply the skills to many kids.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to provide free services that drastically transform the lives of orphans and children from families in need with disabilities through direct medical care, as well as training and education for Chinese doctors, orphanage workers, and caregivers. Ultimately, we aim to help as many children as possible, while responding to Chinese needs and the challenges our local colleagues face. Concurrently, CCPF also aims to strengthen U.S. and China relations through soft power and philanthropic endeavors.

CCPF brings together teams of world-leading pediatrics surgeons, nurses and rehabilitative medicine doctors and therapists from the U.S. to volunteer 1-2 times a year for medical trips to China, remain available throughout the year for on-going consultations, and serve as mentors for Fellows who come from China to NYC as part of CCPF’s Fellowship program. We partner with orphanages and hospitals across China, with whom we have established strong relationships since 1999 and continue to expand our team members and local Chinese partners. Funding is raised through galas and targeted fund-raising events, grants and gifts from foundations, and a year end appeal.

Our medical teams are headed by Medical Director, David P. Roye, Jr., MD, world-renowned pediatric orthopedic spine surgeon. He has received widespread recognition for his efforts, teaching, and research, including the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons Humanitarian Award (2009). Dr. Roye now resides fill-time in China and is able to provide care for CCPF surgical patients year-round. Our rehabilitative medicine team is headed by Dr. Heakyung Kim, MD of physical medicine and rehabilitation, Professor of Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine and Pediatrics at the Columbia University Medical Center and Prof. of Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. Our surgeons, physicians, nurses and operating room technicians – many of whom participated in CCPF’s inaugural surgical trip and continue to participate year after year – along with our Board members, are our best ambassadors. They help recruit team members for each trip, help fundraise, are proactive in introducing CCPF to potential funders and build bridges with our counterparts in China. From the start, with the help of a founding member from China, CCPF secured approval from necessary Chinese ministries and continues to be welcomed back every year.

All funds are supervised and managed by CCPF in the U.S..

Since 1999, CCPF has treated over 1000 children with surgical and rehab interventions. It has become clear that many more disabled children suffer from chronic, non-operable conditions and can benefit from rehab. Therefore, we are putting more effort into expanding our rehab training in orphanages. In addition, the rehab team is working even closer with the surgical team to screen patients and include rehab treatments when applicable. In China, there is a lack of multi-specialty trained surgeons so we are focusing on the most complex cases, as these children are in the most need of care

SURGERY
Two formats for surgical trips are implemented; 3 days with rotating operating rooms for maximum efficiency, which results in numerous operations; 7 days with added time to complete complex surgeries and multiple day operations. The combination of these two models allows us to respond to all types of cases.

REHABILITATION
Rehab medicine team is now working in the orphanages as well as participating in the surgery screenings, to maximize help for children who can benefit from rehab. Outreach and initial meetings with orphanages and hospitals we have not yet worked with in different areas of China is underway. Webinars have been provided, based on as-need basis as per orphanage therapist needs.

FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM IN NEW YORK
Educational exchange is an integral part of the CCPF mission and vision. Each interaction is an exchange of medical knowledge and cultural care. Under the supervision of CCPF's medical Board members, the 2018 Visiting Fellows from Nanjing were teamed up with mentors from Columbia University and shadowed them in surgery, post-op and for a month.

ADMINISTRATION
On the admin level, having 2 co-exec directors splitting responsibilities is very effective. We added a staff member in China to work year-round on follow-up check-ups for our patients and ensure continuous contact with our partner organizations. We continue to address the guidelines put forward by the Chinese government for foreign NGOs. Additionally, and have expanded fundraising efforts to new foundations in the U.S..

Financials

CHILDREN OF CHINA PEDIATRICS FOUNDATION-PSC-
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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CHILDREN OF CHINA PEDIATRICS FOUNDATION-PSC-

Board of directors
as of 4/7/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Gena Palumbo

Goldman Sachs

Term: 1998 - 2021

Gena Palumbo

Goldman Sachs

David Roye

Huaxin Hospital, Shenzhen

John Connor

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Joshua Hyman

NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital

Eda Chao

Charles B. Wang Community Health Center

Haiyang Hong

Minister of Civil Affairs, China

Philip LaRussa

Columbia University Medical Center

Michele Prenoveau Berry

Private Consulting Company

David O'Brien

Peterson Institute for International Economics

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/07/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data