CHURCH WORLD SERVICE INC

aka CWS   |   Elkhart, IN   |  http://www.cwsglobal.org

Mission

Church World Service is a faith-based organization transforming communities around the globe through just and sustainable responses to hunger, poverty, displacement and disaster.

Ruling year info

2000

President and CEO

Rev. John L. McCullough

Main address

28606 Phillips Street PO Box 968

Elkhart, IN 46515 USA

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EIN

13-4080201

NTEE code info

Agricultural Programs (K20)

International Migration, Refugee Issues (Q71)

International Relief (Q33)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CWS has worked for seven decades with one goal: building a world where there is enough for all. We affirm the power of individuals and communities to take ownership of their future. We meet them right where they are, helping them create solutions they can maintain – and build on. That means a refugee family who is able to start a new life. Or someone rebuilding after disaster finds safety with dignity.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

ROMA PROGRAM INITIATIVE: PROTECTION, EDUCATION & I NTEGRATION

The Roma are one of the most marginalized groups in Serbia. Roma face drastic inequalities, transferred from one generation to the next in a perpetuating cycle of poverty. The cycle is reinforced by stereotypes and discrimination as well as legal and institutional gaps. As a result, most Roma end up with fewer skills, worse job prospects and poorer living conditions than their fellow citizens. The cycle continues
with each generation. Our team in Europe is helping to break this cycle for Roma families. Working with local partner Alfa, we offer learning and social support to pre-school children to make sure they have the needed math, literacy and language skills to fully participate in and gain the benefits of education. We also support illiterate Roma women, who are socially excluded on many levels. Through literacy classes and vocational training, participating women are better educated and more prepared to enter the labor market and begin
earning income. This year, our team expanded support for Roma women to include decoupage and woodworking training to 20 women. We worked with 10 selected women
to provide them with the official vocational education certificate in an adult learning center, which gives them an opportunity to seek formal employment or register a shop.

Population(s) Served

Against the backdrop of the dramatic, post-election shift in the U.S. Administration’s positions on climate, environment and energy, Church World Service stepped up all
areas of its advocacy work. In a bid to both protect existing pro-climate policies from being reversed and further build public awareness, CWS collaborates with traditional
and new allies in the United States and beyond. Working with faith partners and backed by our supporters, our team has called for continued Congressional engagement for
climate solutions, reached out to freshmen Members of Congress with an interest in environmental issues, urged public action and witness, led educational workshops,
promoted climate messages through social media, and written to the Administration to call for compassionate policies that focus on the people who are impacted. We continue
to appeal for funding for climate adaptation and mitigation for the most at-risk countries, in opposition to the proposed draconian budgetary cuts. In summer 2017, CWS

Population(s) Served

Our team works in partnership with communities and fellow ACT Alliance members to mitigate the effects of natural disasters and other emergencies. Following the devastation of Hurricane Matthew in the Caribbean and United States, we provided over 46,000 CWS Kits and Blankets to aid in recovery. Working through local partners in Haiti, CWS supported community cooperatives through seed distribution and
repaired or rebuilt damaged houses. In Kenya, our team responded to drought through emergency water supplies, desilting and cash-for-work. Monsoon flooding in Myanmar affected or displaced families, and CWS responded by supplying rice in 26 villages. Fourteen of those villages were part of CWS community development programs; our direct response usually focuses on places where our teams are active and knowledgeable about the local context. CWS emergency response programs address the full disaster
cycle. Our U.S. team facilitated disaster preparedness training with vulnerable groups such as refugees and immigrants. In other cases, we support communities facing ongoing effects of previous crises, such as children in Japan experiencing trauma related to the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake. While most CWS emergency response programs focus on natural disasters, our work also includes responding to man-made crises. For example, we provided a steady supply of milk to stranded
refugee and migrant families with children. Additionally, our partner in Cairo, St. Andrew’s Refugee Services, is addressing twin challenges of a deteriorating economic situation stemming from the severe devaluation of the local currency and a growing number of refugees from Yemen as well as unaccompanied refugee children. This year, CWS distributed more than 206,000 CWS Kits and Blankets, including over 100,000 hygiene kits internationally and nearly 12,000 emergency cleanup buckets in the U.S. Shipments of material goods went to Angola, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Georgia,
Serbia, Sierra Leone, Syria and Venezuela.

Population(s) Served

Through the work of Resettlement Support Center Africa, this past year CWS assisted 16,473 refugee men, women and children in finding safety and rebuilding their lives in the U.S. Our team administers RSC Africa through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau for Population, Refugees and Migration. As part of RSC services, CWS offers pre-departure cultural orientation to refugees who have been approved by the U.S. government for resettlement. This familiarizes them with subjects such as what to expect getting on an airplane for the first time, employment, U.S.
education systems, health care and financial management.
In 2016, CWS expanded its cultural orientation curriculum to include a course specializing in English language for refugees approved for travel to the U.S. Courses were taught in Nyarugusu Refugee Camp in Tanzania and Gihembe Refugee Camp in Rwanda. Results of the four-week course included an increase in test scores by 75-80 percent between pre- and post-tests. An additional outcome that our team observed has been a propensity for refugees who have completed the course to pass on their knowledge to others in therefugee camps by taking on roles as language tutors.

Population(s) Served

Access to education is a fundamental human right for all
children and a key building block of transformative impact
at individual, family and community levels. That’s why
our team - through our School Safe Zones program - is
working with partners in 10 schools in Kenya’s West Pokot
and Turkana counties. We remain resolutely committed
to ensuring that all girls and boys have access to safe,
accessible and affordable education. This year, the SSZ program employed creative and sustainable solutions that have broken some of the challenges that children, especially girls, face when attempting to complete their education. Girls in isolated, rural areas often face deep-seated barriers to education, including female genital mutilation and early forced
marriages, which continue to curtail girls from realizing
their full potential.

Population(s) Served

CWS provides legal services to immigrants and refugees at local resettlement offices throughout the United States. These services include helping file immigration applications and offering the necessary guidance to keep families together. This year, CWS-administered offices saw more than 1,125 clients, 726 of whom were new clients. These clients immigrated from more than 60 countries. In addition to providing direct legal services, CWS staff host Know Your Rights workshops, conduct naturalization preparedness workshops, and participate in community consultations with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Population(s) Served

CWS builds on its initial resettlement programming through integration programs that extend services to refugees past the initial 90-day resettlement period. In 2016, CWS assisted more than 3,100 refugees in 27 communities across the U.S. to
achieve early self-sufficiency within six months of arrival through the Matching Grant Program. Refugees enrolled in the program receive modest financial support while they
participate in the extended case management and employment services needed to familiarize them to the U.S. labor market, learn how to find and succeed in jobs, and
address barriers to employment. By leveraging refugees’ strengths, the Matching Grant Program has a remarkable success rate; this year, 87 percent of refugees were self sufficient through employment six months after arrival. Local communities match every two dollars provided by the federal government with one dollar of contributions of time, goods and financial support. In Fiscal Year 2016, local communities will contribute more than $3 million to support refugees’ early self-sufficiency. CWS provided more than 1,700 of the most vulnerable refugees in 15 communities with individualized, intensive services through the Preferred Communities program. These services include intensive case management, intensive community orientation, alternative wellness programming and community engagement. All services are marked by their attention to a collaborative, strengths-based, extended and holistic approach. By the conclusion of services, refugees have achieved the goals set out in their service plan
and are able to independently navigate their communities. Recognizing that improving integration outcomes requires support and capacity within the receiving community, the
program engages in targeted partnership development and community partner training to ensure that refugees have access to appropriate services. The Refugee AmeriCorps program enhances mutual understanding between refugees
and their new U.S. community through intensive community orientation. In 2016, 11 full-time AmeriCorps members in nine communities committed to a year of service to offer in-depth, interactive, localized orientation to newly arrived refugees and build capacity within the local community to work with refugees. Intensive community orientation focused on the areas of housing, health and employment, which are
identified pillars of successful resettlement and integration. Through increased mutual understanding, refugees will be able to independently navigate their communities, maintain a stable and safe environment and ultimately achieve long term integration.

Population(s) Served

The CWS Gran Chaco program is a long-term, cross-border initiative that strengthens local ecumenical partnerships and grassroots efforts to build the skills and capacity of indigenous peoples – especially women – to advocate effectively for their rights to land, water, education, health, food and a life free from violence. In response to chronic drought, our team supports community-led advocacy to accelerate government investment in small-scale water solutions, particularly family and community rainwater harvesting systems. Participating communities are trained by CWS partners Fundapaz, CERDET and JUM to use participatory mapping and geographic information system tools as part of their advocacy. These groups succeeded in many of their petitions to municipal and state authorities and made community decisions that were
better informed about land and natural resource use and management. In late 2016, our team redefined its approach to work in Paraguay to adapt to local political and partnership contexts and in response to lessons learned in previous
years. In partnership with Comite de Iglesias of Paraguay, CWS’s food security and development work began in March 2017 with 90 families in the communities of San Patricio and San Fernando. In eight remote locations in the Gran Chaco, organized indigenous women developed and led municipal advocacy campaigns. They were accompanied by CWS implementing partners JUM, CERDET, Endepa and Fundapaz, and they successfully engaged and mobilized local authorities, non-indigenous allies and indigenous male leaders.

Population(s) Served

An important transition happened in our programs in Myanmar this year. What used to be individual projects for community-based Disaster Risk Reduction and water infrastructure improvement are now more holistic community development programs. The new, integrated approach includes community information sessions for parents about better nutrition for young children, improved household
sanitation through latrine construction, first steps for families
to improve their livelihoods through raising poultry and expanding home gardens and support for better access to safe water. In partnership with the Myanmar YMCA in Pathein, our team continued support for five villages in Ngaputaw Township to complete a variety of small-scale infrastructure projects to help them reduce the impact of future disasters, particularly flooding. In all, more than 1,300 families – about 7,000 people – will continue to benefit from these improvements. In the Ayeyarwady River delta, our staff’s integrated approach to support for vulnerable families and communities helped them cope with the reality that the river is a source of livelihoods, especially fishing, but is also a cause of perennial harm and destruction from flooding. Through nutrition education, DRR and water, sanitation and hygiene programs in 20 villages in two Ayeyarwady region townships, CWS helped 2,431 families – nearly 12,000 people – take steps towards improved wellbeing. These programs involved material and technical support from CWS as well as encouraging communities to work together to establish action steps. While responding to flooding in late 2016, CWS supported 1,896 families with whom we were already partnering – about 8,000 people – with emergency rice and cooking oil while they coped with rising, then receding, flood waters.

Population(s) Served

The CWS Protecting Urban Refugees through Empowerment program continues to support almost 500 especially vulnerable refugees and asylum seekers in Jakarta,
including 200 unaccompanied and separated children. The program helps to ensure basic rights and protection and to address the risk of sexual and gender-based violence
while improving response when harm does happen.
In partnership with national organizations Dompet Dhuafa and Lifespring and with Indonesian government officials, schools, hospitals and clinics, CWS provided monthly
subsistence allowances to 480 people; enrolled 27 refugee children in schools; facilitated access to classes and recreation for more than 800; and facilitated health care – including mental health services – and health information access for nearly 3,000 people. Additionally, CWS supported 200 unaccompanied and separated children living in five CWS-organized group homes, in rented rooms or in foster care with families.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

American Institute of Philanthropy 2009

Awards

Top 100 Highly Rated Charities 2009

GiveSpot.org

Affiliations & memberships

InterAction - Member 1984

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Is a faith-based organization transforming communities around the globe through just and sustainable response to hunger, poverty, displacement and disaster. CWS supports sustainable development by meeting emergency needs, assisting refugees and displaced persons, and addressing the root causes of hunger and poverty. CWS provides financial, technical and material assistance from the U.S., and through programs and our local partner organizations worldwide. Our areas of focus include hunger and malnutrition, protecting vulnerable women and children, assisting the displaced and promoting access to clean water. CWS core development work internationally supports an asset-based, contextual approach to community development. CWS is committed to employing its resources in a strategic and focused way to achieve the greatest positive improvement in people's lives in the areas where we work. The aim of our efforts is clear: to make a world where there is enough for all.

Our work is guided by our strategic plan, established every four years. Every global region has three goals with subsets, designed to benchmark improvement in our core areas of protecting women and children, promoting food security and access to clean water. In each region, CWS addresses three goals in its strategic plan: one to address chronic problems, one to handle crises that develop and another to enhance our partnerships. Goal 1 - Chronic Marginalized communities experiencing chronic hunger and poverty will achieve durable solutions that build peace and justice. Goal 2 - Crisis Communities experiencing crisis will achieve durable solutions that build or restore peace and justice. Goal 3 - Partnership Partnerships will be strengthened to build collaboration and solidarity.

Is an $96 million a year agency supported by individual donations, foundation and philanthropic grants, and government funding for contracted services. One of the strongest resources we have is our relationship with community- and regional-level organizations we call local partners. These groups know best the needs of their communities and what resources are available. Church World Service provides funding, technical assistance and other supports with the aim to build capacity, so that our local partners can eventually take care of their own communities. Church World Service partners have given the agency high marks in independent assessments. Originally conceived as a grassroots effort, Church World Service makes use of faith-based and secular community networks to advocate on behalf of the world's poor, such as Geneva-based ACT Alliance. In advocacy on US and international platforms, CWS pushes for a world with greater compassion, peace and justice.

Assisted more than 3,100 refugees in 27 communities across the US and achieved early self-sufficiency within 6 months of arrival. Provided more than 1,700 of the most vulnerable refugees in 15 communities with individualized, intensive services such as intensive case management & community orientation, alternative wellness & community engagement. In West Timor expanded the Timor Zero Hunger program partnering with families, community leaders & government colleagues. In the Ume Manekan Women & Children's Hospital, nurses engaged mothers in the CWS-supported Therapeutic Feeding Center, treating 69 very young children for severe, acute malnutrition, offering high-energy milk & nutritious food as well as education for ongoing care in order to sustain gains. 348 families with children under 5 improved caring & feeding practices. 100 households enjoy increased safe water access. and benefited from better hygiene knowledge & practices, especially the 50 families that built latrines.

Financials

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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CHURCH WORLD SERVICE INC

Board of directors
as of 7/21/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Rev. Patricia E. de Jong


Board co-chair

Mr. Daniel Hazman

United Church of Christ

Patricia de Jong

United Church of Christ

Roland Fernandes

United Methodist Church

Laura Roberts

Pantheon Enterprises, Inc.

Daniel Hazman

IDH The Sustainable Trade Initiative

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes