Osborne Association, Inc.

Transforming Lives, Communities, and the Criminal Justice System

aka The Osborne Association   |   Bronx, NY   |  www.osborneny.org

Mission

The Osborne Association serves individuals, families, and communities affected by the criminal justice system. Through our programs, we offer opportunities for people to heal from and repair harm, restore their lives, and thrive. We challenge systems rooted in racism and retribution and fight for policies and practices that promote true safety, justice, and liberation.

Ruling year info

1938

Principal Officer

Elizabeth Gaynes

Main address

809 Westchester Avenue

Bronx, NY 10455 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-5563028

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Transitional Care, Half-Way House for Offenders/Ex-Offenders (I31)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Racial disparities are embedded at every level of the criminal justice system. People of color comprise 37% of the U.S. population, but 67% of the prison population. Many remain in jail without a conviction because they cannot afford to pay bail. In the United States, there are 2.2 million people in prison and jails, which represents an increase of 500% over the last 40 years. Mass incarceration exacerbates structural inequality and has created the most pressing issues of our time. We seek to strengthen the policy influence of those directly impacted by the system by amplifying their voices and supporting the infrastructure for their successful reentry. By funding policy, practice, and narrative change efforts, we aim to advance racial justice and address the structural inequities perpetuated by the criminal justice system.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education, vocational training, and employment services

Education: Individual tutoring, high school equivalency and college preparation, computer skills

Vocational training: construction, green jobs, culinary and food service leading to industry recognized credentials

Employment services: Hard and soft skills training, internships, transitional work, and job placements focused on culinary art and food services and construction. Other job areas available.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Young adults

Since 1989, Osborne has offered substance use disorder treatment through a day treatment program as an alternative to incarceration. The program was created in response to the crack epidemic, but it continually evolves, keeping pace with new evidence-based practices. Adapting and innovating treatment options, such as trauma-informed care, gender-responsive treatment and integration of family, health education, GED, vocational training and employment services allows us to meet the changing needs of participants.

Integrative Health also offers Wellness and Prevention Services. For more than two decades, Wellness and Prevention (originally Community-based Prevention Services) has provided HIV services to those at risk of infectious disease and individuals living with HIV/AIDS. Created in 2001 as a response to the HIV epidemic, the program serves over 300 individuals annually and is located at Osborne’s Bronx site, an area with one of the highest incidence rates of HIV, hepatitis and other chronic conditions in New York City.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
People with diseases and illnesses

More than 100,000 children in New York State have a parent currently in prison or jail.

Osborne’s Child, Youth, and Family Services (CYFS) believes that with support, children with incarcerated parents are not and should not be defined or limited by their parents’ choices. CYFS helps children with a currently or formerly incarcerated parent to overcome stigma and isolation by offering a strengths-based, non-judgmental, child-friendly environment, along with support, various services, and resources tailored to these children’s unique needs and perspectives.

Our services and approach are grounded in the research-supported belief that children do better when their primary relationships are supported and nurtured. Through a family-focused approach, we aim to strengthen children’s relationships with both their incarcerated parent and their current caregiver.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

I-CAN is an innovative jail-based community reentry program that is expected to reduce recidivism by 10% by focusing on people assessed to be at highest risk for re-incarceration – and to support them in achieving a successful reintegration into their families and communities.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

For more than 25 years, the Osborne Association’s Court Advocacy Services (CAS) has served New York City criminal defense attorneys whose clients face incarceration. Forensic social workers and court advocates conduct in-depth psycho-social assessments, collect and review records, and develop individualized pretrial release and sentencing recommendations for submission to the court and district attorney. We seek alternatives to pretrial detention when possible, and in appropriate cases seek alternatives to incarceration. As a result of our report and recommendation, more than 90% of the cases we accept lead to an alternative to a jail or prison term, or to a lesser sentence than would have been imposed otherwise.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

Where we work

Awards

Non-Profit Excellence Award 2019

New York Community Trust

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Incarcerated people, People of African descent, People of Latin American descent, Substance abusers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Osborne Association serves over 12,000 individuals with justice involvement both in and out of jails and prisons.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Incarcerated people, Substance abusers, People of Latin American descent, People of African descent

Related Program

Education, vocational training, and employment services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Over the course of the program, participants receive soft and hard skills training for careers that interest them, so that they can successfully enter the workforce with necessary credentials.

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent, People of Latin American descent, Substance abusers, Economically disadvantaged people, Incarcerated people

Related Program

Education, vocational training, and employment services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provide training and readiness groups to participants that lead to industry-recognized credentials for construction, warehouse distribution and janitorial maintenance and food service.

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent, People of Latin American descent, Substance abusers, Economically disadvantaged people, Incarcerated people

Related Program

Health and Wellness

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Osborne's Trauma Clinician provides consultations to Osborne teams or individual staff members that address specific cases or recurrent themes.

Number of youth receiving services (e.g., groups, skills and job training, etc.) with youths living in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent, People of Latin American descent, Substance abusers, Economically disadvantaged people, Incarcerated people

Related Program

Child, Youth, and Family Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Programs operate at sites in the South Bronx, Brooklyn, Harlem, and Buffalo, and also reach participants in youth detention facilities, jails, prisons, probation/parole offices, and criminal courts.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our aim is to build a justice system that promotes healing, safety, accountability, and wellbeing across generations. We challenge systems grounded in retribution and racism, and fight for policies and practices that promote true safety, justice, and liberation.

Because we address complex injustices and harms, Osborne seeks change on all levels, from a single person to entire institutions. We see how crime and criminal justice systems destroy individuals, families and communities. We know that respect, accountability, and resources have the power to transform lives and to bend criminal justice systems towards justice, as defined by equity, inclusion, investment, and healing.

Osborne operates programs that give people the opportunity to avoid incarceration; heal, learn, and remain close to their families during incarceration; and rebuild their lives after incarceration. We serve whole families and people of all ages. We advocate for laws, policies, and institutions that address racial injustice and honor every person’s capacity to change.

Crucially, Osborne’s staff reflects in many ways the populations we serve. Many Osborne employees are bilingual in English and Spanish; half of us identify as Black and nearly 30% Latino; many live in the neighborhoods where our participants live. Most of Osborne’s staff has direct personal experience of the criminal justice system, either through their own arrest and incarceration or that of family members.

Osborne employs a number of innovative and informed practices in order to serve our vulnerable populations such as our peer mentors which we employ at all levels to serve as a resource guide and support system across many of our programs. We also support work readiness and retention through various trainings, job placement and follow-up support; healthy lifestyles through evidence based interventions to heal trauma, substance use treatment services, support for those with chronic conditions and health programs in jails and prisons; family support through education, reentry planning, therapeutic activities, workshops and leadership programs, video and family visiting; and housing through our reentry hotline, community partnerships with connections to affordable housing support, advocacy and the upcoming launch of our Fulton Community Reentry Center, a former prison turned community reentry center.

In order to support the work Osborne does on the level of systems change, Osborne created a policy and advocacy unity, the Osborne Center for Justice Across Generations (OCJAG). OCJAG works to build a justice system that promotes healing, safety, accountability and wellbeing across generations with dedicated staff who organize and mobilize community-based coalitions, educate officials, offer public testimony and run events, social media campaigns and more.

Osborne provides a broad range of treatment, educational, vocational, and family services to more than 6,000 people annually, supporting its mission of offering opportunities for transformation through innovative and effective programming that serves the community by reducing crime and its human and economic impact. Many of these are the first of their kind and several have either been adopted by other community-based organizations or used by government agencies to shape their own programming, including: 1) the first comprehensive parenting program for incarcerated fathers in a state prison; 2) the first collect-call AIDS Hotline in the nation for individuals in prison; 3) the first toll-free Hotline to provide information and support for family members of people in prison; 4) an original discharge planning and reentry case management model for HIV+ people leaving prison; 5) New York’s first day treatment (intensive outpatient) alternative to incarceration for chemically dependent felony defendants; and 6) a 20-year-old program of defender-based advocacy for alternatives to incarceration.

Additionally, Osborne is a leader in developing programs and policy initiatives that support justice-involved people. In 2016, we consolidated our policy advocacy, technical assistance, and public education efforts by creating the Osborne Center for Justice Across Generations. OCJAG focuses on policies affecting incarcerated/formerly incarcerated older adults and those experiencing homelessness or who are unstably housed, as well as children of incarcerated parents.

Osborne has decades of experience in meeting data collection, protection, and reporting requirements with accuracy, dependability, and integrity. For each program we offer, Osborne keeps a written Data Policy and Procedures Manual, naming individuals responsible for collecting, entering, and analyzing data at each stage of participants’ involvement in the program and tracking contract performance targets. Data collection tools include Osborne’s universal intake form, the trauma-informed Strengths and Difficulties questionnaire, case management notes, meeting notes, participant surveys, and information obtained from referral partners.

Osborne employs social workers, number crunchers, peer workers, employment specialists, managers, interns, leaders, and others. Each one has a valued role in making Osborne’s mission real.

Osborne has an 80-year history of leadership in working with people involved with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals, beginning with its founder, Thomas Mott Osborne, a former warden at Sing Sing Prison who believed that everyone deserves a second chance in life. Under the three-decade leadership of Elizabeth Gaynes, President and CEO, Osborne has grown steadily from a two-person operation to a leader in the field. Ms. Gaynes, who began her career as a criminal defense and prisoners’ rights attorney, has become a nationally recognized expert on criminal justice and reentry in the context of family and community, and in 2013 was named a Champion of Change by the Obama White House. Today, Osborne is a powerful presence in the criminal justice community with over 300 employees, serving sites in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Beacon, NY, as well as in 39 jails and state prisons.

Osborne serves more than 12,000 people a year directly (and tens of thousands more visiting prisons), we offer workforce preparation and job placement; substance use disorder and trauma treatment; youth mentoring and support; court advocacy; alternatives to incarceration; parenting education; health support; advocacy; and reentry services. In two years, we will open the Fulton Reentry Center, a former-prison-turned-community-hub supported by a 20 year operating contract from NYC Dept. of Homeless Services, with 135 transitional beds and workforce and related programs for formerly incarcerated NYers. We are also engaged in two supportive/affordable housing projects (led by L+M Development Partners and Xenolith Partners, respectively) that, when complete, will enable us to offer services in 80+ supportive housing units in Brownsville for recently released people.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Osborne Association, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Osborne Association, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/30/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. James Rubin

Meridiam North America

Term: 2020 - 2024

Jeffrey Smith

Wolf Haldenstein Adler Freeman & Hertz LLP

Mark Walter

Publishing Executive

Katrina vanden Heuvel

The Nation

Lithgow Osborne

Self-employed

Lucretia Wells

Pennsylvania Association of Independent Schools

Dr. Zelma Weston Henriques

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Victor Germack

Rate Financials, Inc.

Alfonso Wyatt

Strategic Destiny

Caren Hendren

Real Estate

David Goldberg

Donahue & Goldberg, LLP

Adam Hellegers

L+M Development Partners

Michael Ryan

Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton

Brian Fischer

NY State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision (retired)

Alison Novak

The Hudson Companies

Andrew Potash

Distinguished Programs Group

Yasmin Cornelius

L+M Development Partners and C+C Apartment Management

Angela Diaz

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Esther Fein

Rachel Fine

PTA Link

James Rubin

Meridiam NA

Page Travelstead

Wells Fargo

John Valverde

YouthBuild USA

Mathew Wambua

NYC Housing Development Corporation

Frank Baker

Siris Capital

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/13/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/13/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.