AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE HQ

Global Jewish Advocacy

aka AJC   |   New York, NY   |  www.ajc.org

Mission

American Jewish Committee's mission is to enhance the well-being of the Jewish people and Israel, and to advance human rights and democratic values in the United States and around the world.

Ruling year info

1929

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. David Harris

Main address

165 East 56th Street

New York, NY 10022 USA

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EIN

13-5563393

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

International Peace and Security (Q40)

Intergroup/Race Relations (R30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Programs

AJC has solidified its identity as the leading global Jewish advocacy organization. We have been lauded by government officials and partners from other faith and ethnic groups for our role in advancing the interests of Israel, world Jewry, and all people.

AJC's programmatic resources are focused on the following advocacy priorities:

• Combating antisemitism and all forms of hate
• Strengthening Israel’s place in the world and cultivating new allies
• Promoting pluralism and protecting democratic values

AJC achieves results through our 4-pillar advocacy model, which combines global diplomacy, political advocacy, coalition-building, and strategic communications. These pillars are active locally, nationally, and globally through our network of 24 U.S. Regional Offices, 13 overseas posts, and 37 international Jewish community partnerships.

Population(s) Served
Jewish people

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

AJC is fighting for a safer, more peaceful future for the Jewish people, Israel, and all humanity. With more than 30 offices worldwide, plus partnerships with 37 international Jewish community organizations, AJC works globally to enhance the well-being of Jews in the United States and around the world, and to safeguard the rights and freedoms of all people.

AJC's top advocacy priorities are:

• Combating antisemitism and all forms of hate
• Strengthening Israel’s place in the world and cultivating new allies
• Promoting pluralism and protecting democratic values

These priorities are underpinned by a profound belief that we must work to ensure the strong leadership role of the U.S. in global affairs as the best protection for our nation's interests, the preservation and advancement of democratic values and human dignity, and the security of our closest allies, especially Israel.

Diplomacy:

AJC has developed unrivaled access to decision-makers across the globe, including heads of state, diplomats, and other world leaders. There are 193 UN member states. Over the past year, AJC has held high-level meetings with the top government officials of more than half of them. Through strategic, long-term diplomacy based on these established relationships, AJC is able to affect policy on the critical issues of our time.

AJC enlists the support of governments to denounce publicly all manifestations of extremism and antisemitism, and calls on them to unleash the vast resources at their disposal in an effort to stem hatred, bigotry, extremism, and terrorism.

AJC proactively seeks to help expand Israel's ties with strategically important countries around the world by identifying new areas for cooperation. We also urge government leaders to reject unfair boycotts of Israel and confront antisemitism masked as criticism of the Jewish state.

Political Advocacy:

Through AJC's Washington-based Office of Policy and Political Affairs and our 24 Regional Offices, AJC advocates with the U.S. Administration and Congress to take action and pass legislation that furthers our priorities. Our Regional Offices also connect with state and local elected officials to build understanding of, and support for, AJC's positions.

Coalition-building:

AJC builds alliances among diverse ethnic and religious groups to advance issues of common concern. AJC is a pioneer in advancing interfaith understanding. Fundamental to our mission is the belief that the well-being of the Jewish community is linked to that of other faith and ethnic groups in the United States and around the world. Building coalitions to advance shared interests and supporting democracy and pluralism has been central to our work since our founding in 1906.

Strategic Communications:

AJC leverages traditional and social media to amplify our advocacy efforts. Through television interviews, press releases, social media, and op-eds in leading global publications, AJC experts influence the public debate on our top advocacy priorities. AJC leaders are quoted widely and are sought-after analysts on a full range of breaking news issues.

With Facebook and Twitter accounts in multiple languages and more than three million followers, AJC uses social media as a powerful advocacy tool to gain international support for initiatives and spread our message to followers around the world, including many diplomats, elected officials, and media elites.

Because of its access, credibility, record of impact, and the level of trust it has garnered, AJC is uniquely positioned among Jewish organizations to effect change on the global, national, and local levels. We leverage these qualities to shape the opinions and policy decisions of those in power.

AJC Project Interchange:

Project Interchange (PI), an educational institute of AJC, serves this goal. PI helps dispel negative stereotypes and build support for Israel by providing a broader understanding of the country's security dilemmas and economic and social challenges for some of the world's most influential figures. In 2019, PI held 25 seminars, bringing policy and opinion leaders to Israel in order for them to experience the country firsthand. In total, PI has brought 6,000 leaders from all 50 U.S. states and over 110 nations.

Alumni have advanced Israel’s positioning through academic exchange programs, bilateral research agreements, positive media articles, international policy decisions, mutually-beneficial business development, and much more.

Global Reach and Influence:

AJC has a unique global architecture that spans six continents, distinguishing us from all comparable organizations. AJC has 13 overseas posts and regional institutes that serve as our advocacy hubs in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East. Plus, we have 37 partnerships with international Jewish community organizations, with whom we frequently collaborate on important initiatives. Within the U.S., AJC has 24 Regional Offices that support the organization's global priorities on a local level.

This worldwide network of offices and affiliates, combined with AJC's unparalleled access to top leaders, gives us the reach and influence we need to advance our priorities. Our teams are able to mobilize at a moment's notice when urgent issues relating to our advocacy priorities arise.

And our global presence allows us to engage in long-term diplomacy as well. Around the world—from the hallways of the UN in New York to the corridors of the European Union in Brussels to the countries of Asia—AJC is changing perceptions and positions that build support for Israel in international forums and encourage prompt denunciation of antisemitism and extremism.

AJC has solidified its identity as the leading global Jewish advocacy organization. We have been lauded by government officials and partners from other faith and ethnic groups for our role in advancing the interests of Israel, world Jewry, and all people. AJC has achieved tangible results—government policies, strong alliances, and hard-hitting legislation. Below are some recent accomplishments:

A. AJC’s #ShowUpForShabbat campaign, a global response to the Tree of Life synagogue attack in 2018, became the largest-ever expression of solidarity with the American Jewish community, with the hashtag being viewed by over 250 million people on social media alone. It showcased AJC’s ability to work with political, civic, religious, and ethnic leaders of all backgrounds and persuasions to say no to violence and hate. One year after the attack, we again brought people across America together to honor the memory of those we lost in Pittsburgh and to inspire policymakers to take action against antisemitism and all forms of hatred.
Shortly after this anniversary, AJC launched Translate Hate, an innovative digital resource aimed at enabling Americans of all backgrounds to understand and expose antisemitic tropes and to take action against hate speech. Presented in the form of an illustrated glossary, Translate Hate lays out terms and expressions that are examples of antisemitism, explains the antisemitic nature of certain words or phrases when used in specific contexts and provides brief histories of their harmful usage. Translate Hate follows on the release of AJC’s groundbreaking survey of American Jews’ experiences and perceptions of antisemitism in the United States. The survey has been widely-covered in the media and has garnered the attention of top senior government officials and civil society leaders, who are recognizing that the time for action is now.

B. AJC launched a major advocacy campaign, urging the European Union to designate Hezbollah—in its entirety—a terrorist organization. Banning the group’s military wing but recognizing its supposed “political wing” as a legitimate player in Lebanese politics, as many countries do, enables this terrorist organization to raise funds and recruit operatives. AJC, in conjunction with the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT), prepared a robust, widely-covered report refuting the common arguments against banning Hezbollah. During the opening of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA), AJC also published a full-page New York Times ad and produced a series of television and social media ads, calling out the European Union for its failure to unambiguously label Hezbollah a terrorist organization. The ads garnered attention from senior government officials from many countries. AJC also continues to raise this as a priority in our diplomatic meetings with world leaders. The campaign has been gaining momentum. The UK and Argentina recently joined the list of countries that fully designate Hezbollah’s terror, a step highly recommended by AJC.

C. For years, AJC has urged countries worldwide to adopt the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) Working Definition of Antisemitism, as a vital tool to mobilize against antisemitism. Recently, Greece, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Hungary, Luxembourg, and Moldova joined the growing list of nations that have adopted the Working Definition. Originally drafted by AJC, and formally adopted by the IHRA, the comprehensive Working Definition describes all forms of antisemitism, including anti-Zionism. AJC will continue to advocate for nations, especially those in Europe, to adopt and implement the definition, so there is a universal understanding of what constitutes antisemitism and concrete, practical methods to combat this evil. AJC has also prompted several European governments to appoint special commissioners to address rising hatred against Jews.

D. AJC initiated the creation of the congressional Bipartisan Task Force for Combating Antisemitism. Now, with more than 170 members, most recruited by AJC, it crafts policies to address rising antisemitism in the U.S. and abroad. As antisemitic incidents multiply across our country and around the world, its role grows ever more important. For this reason, AJC has made it a core goal to help recruit additional members of Congress to join the task force.

E. When Malaysia’s Prime Minister, known for his history of antisemitic rhetoric, tried to ban Israeli athletes from competing in the 2019 World Para Swimming Championships, set to be held in the Malaysian city of Kuching, AJC mobilized thousands of people from over 70 countries to sign our petition and speak out against this discriminatory decision. In the aftermath of AJC’s advocacy, the International Paralympic Committee Governing Board stripped Malaysia of its role as host and stood alongside the Israeli athletes who had been targeted.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE

Board of directors
as of 11/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Anthony E. Meyer

David Harris

Richard Berkman

John Shapiro

Marvin Israelow

Kim Pimley

Ned Dubilo

Suzanne Jaffe

Allan Reich

David Inlander

Michael Tichnor

Rene-Pierre Azria

Roberta Baruch

Martin Krall

Linda Mirels

Harriet Schleifer

Matthew Bronfman

Matthew Coen

Henry Dubinsky

Frank Linde

Robert Newmark

Steven Wisch

Steven Zelkowitz

Robert Lapin

Anthony Meyer

Ben Plotkin

Debra Saidoff

Jeffrey Stone

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/01/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data