ADIRONDACK HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION

Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake

aka Adirondack Experience   |   Blue Mountain Lake, NY   |  http://www.theadkx.org

Mission

The Adirondack Experience (ADKX) expands the public understanding of Adirondack history and the relationship between people and the Adirondack wilderness, fostering informed choices for the future. The ADKX welcomes more than 50,000 annual visitors and more than 4 million to date. Visitors come primarily from New York State, the New England States, Canada and beyond. Outreach programs are offered to K-12 students throughout the Adirondack Park serving 10,000 students annually.

Notes from the nonprofit

To learn more about the museum's commitment to access for all, visit https://www.theadkx.org/adkx-commitment-to-access-for-all/

Ruling year info

1992

Executive Director

Mr. David M Kahn

Main address

PO Box 99

Blue Mountain Lake, NY 12812 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-5635801

NTEE code info

History Museums (A54)

Libraries, Library Science (B70)

Museum & Museum Activities (A50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Adirondack Experience works to expand public understanding and appreciation of Adirondack history and the Adirondack wilderness, fostering informed choices for the future.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adirondack Experience Programs

Museum visitors observe and learn about the history of the Adirondack region through activities, exhibits, programs, workshops, lectures, and artisan demonstrations. Demonstrations include rustic furniture making; basket-weaving; quilt making; fleece spinning, wool carding, yarn dying, and knitting; traditional blacksmithing; Swedish rug weaving; and Apple Pressing with a steam-powered cider press. Rustic mirrors, rustic tables, pine needle baskets, pressed flowers, Adirondack pack baskets, birch bark containers, and porcupine quillwork workshops are held. Ongoing hands-on activities include a boat shop for kids, a row on the pond in a restored nineteenth-century skiff, and an active guideboat builder's shobut predominately the eastern United States.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Accreditation 2010

American Museums Assocaition

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of audience members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2020, due to COVID-19, the museum did not open to the public for the season. Constituents were served with virtual programs and educational outreach. In-person visitation was tracked previously.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In 2014, the Adirondack Experience developed the first Exhibition Master Plan in its history. The driving force behind the creation of the Exhibition Master Plan is to make sure that the museum is in a strong position to continue conveying the story of the Adirondacks to its visitors in the most engaging possible manner. The plan laid out a blueprint for bringing the museum's 65,000 square feet of exhibitions up to date through the introduction of more interactive, hands-on learning opportunities, and a greater focus on the contemporary world and regional diversity. Complementing this plan is the 2018 Campus Master Plan, which surveyed the extensive museum's campus with an eye toward better engaging audiences in multiple spaces by activating the whole campus.

In keeping with museum practice, evaluation will take place throughout exhibition planning to guarantee that ideas generated by the planning team resonate with potential future visitors to the Adirondack Experience. All evaluation will be the responsibility of Dr. Jeffrey Hayward of People, Places & Design Research. Dr. Hayward will review visitor studies commissioned by the Adirondack Experience. The purpose will be to develop a concrete profile of the museum's audience and to generate hypotheses about the needs and interests of existing and aspirational audiences. The organization will then begin testing receptiveness to specific exhibition and visitor experience ideas. The results of this research will be used to reshape, as necessary, the planning team's ideas about future visitor experiences at the Adirondack Experience. The final stage of exhibition planning involves both quantitative and qualitative testing of the planning team's ideas. This process was used to develop the 2017 exhibition and will also be used to develop and refine other planned permanent exhibitions.

The museum has a staff of 32 year round and 65 seasonal employees, an operating budget of $5M, and is financially sound with an endowment of approximately $50M. In 2011, the museum's board mounted a national search for a new Executive Director. David M. Kahn was hired in September 2011 and charge with the task of reimaging the Adirondack Experience for contemporary visitors. Kahn's previous experience includes serving as Executive Director of the Brooklyn Historical Society, the Connecticut Historical Society, the Louisiana State Museum, and the San Diego History Center. The board, Mr. Kahn, and members of the senior staff team regularly review and update the institution's long-term goals and strategic vision for the museum's future.

In 2017, the ADKX realized the first priority in the Exhibition Master Plan and opened an $8M 19,000-square-foot interactive permanent exhibition, Life in the Adirondacks. Housed in an existing building, the new interactive exhibition was designed by Gallagher & Associates and Richard Lewis Media Group. It provides an orientation to both ADKX as a whole and the story of the Adirondacks. It is now every visitor’s starting point when touring the campus. Additional improvements that have been completed recently include a new nature trail, a boathouse that enables visitors to experience rowing historic craft on a pristine body of water, Minnow Pond, and infrastructure improvements that have enhanced universal access and wayfinding.

In future years, additional projects identified in a 2014 Exhibition Master Plan and a 2018 Campus Master Plan will be realized to further invigorate the visitor experience. The current priority is an exhibition to showcase ADKX’s extensive fine and decorative arts collections.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

ADIRONDACK HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ADIRONDACK HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION

Board of directors
as of 8/31/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Anne Van Ingen


Board co-chair

Robert Searle

Michael Bird

Anne Bodnar

E. Darcie Corbin

Lucy Craske

Timothy Delaney

Peter Falco

Drew Forhan

Nancy Keet

Benita Law-Diao

William Locke

Ann O'Leary

Geoffrey Robillard

David Rockwell

Nancy Sayer

Richard Scordato

Robert Searle

Scott Stevens

Sally Svenson

Garrett Thelander

James Townsend

Anne Van Ingen

Sarah Underhill

Gregory Wolcott

Anne Van Ingen

Sally Svenson

James Townsend

Anne Van Ingen

Anne Van Ingen

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/2/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/02/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.