Adirondack Council

Preserving Water, Air and Wildlands

Elizabethtown, NY   |  http://www.adirondackcouncil.org

Mission

The mission of the Adirondack Council is to ensure the ecological integrity and wild character of the Adirondack Park. We envision an Adirondack Park composed of large core wilderness areas and clean water and air, connected to working farms and forests, and augmented by vibrant communities.

Ruling year info

1978

Executive Director

Mr. William (Willie) C. Janeway

Main address

PO Box D- 2 103 Hand Avenue, #3

Elizabethtown, NY 12932 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

14-1594386

NTEE code info

Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management (C32)

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Adirondack Council is a non-profit, non-governmental organization created in 1975. Its mission is to ensure the ecological integrity and wild character of the Adirondack Park for current and future generations. The Council’s vision is of an Adirondack Park with clean water and air and large wilderness areas, surrounded by working forests and farms and vibrant local communities. The Adirondack Council is committed to ensuring that New York’s six-million-acre Adirondack Park will forever offer vast areas of undisturbed open space as a sanctuary for native plant and animal species, as a natural haven for human beings in need of spiritual and physical refreshment, and as a place that preserves and protects clean water, air and land.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Communities

The Adirondack Park is a global model of how public and private lands can sustainably coexist in environmental and economic harmony, with eco-friendly, resource-based local economies and vibrant communities in a park-like setting.

Supporting a better, more resilient, sustainable Adirondack Park, including vibrant local communities. Goals include:

Support science-based improvements at the Adirondack Park Agency, including smart conservation design.
Expand mutual respect and collaboration with local communities through state support for village and hamlet smart growth planning.
Increase the number of municipalities in the Park coordinating project review with the Adirondack Park Agency while maintaining resource protection.

Population(s) Served

Defending and promoting the wild character and ecological integrity of the Adirondack Park and the "Forever Wild" Forest Preserve. Goals include: Secure additional acres of public land for the Adirondack Forest Preserve. Increase the Forever Wild acres that are protected with a Wilderness designation or Wilderness management. State adoption of comprehensive conservation area complex planning. Improve stewardship of state lands and waters. Propose provisions to strengthen and improve Article XIV of the Constitution, the Forever Wild Clause.

Population(s) Served

Clean water is the greatest ecological and economic resource of the Adirondack Park. Thousands of lakes and streams provide habitat, recreational opportunities and drinking water. Acid rain and air pollution have long damaged the Park’s waters. Climate change threatens native species and the winter economy.

Fighting for clean water and clean air; combating invasive species and climate change. Goals include: Reduce acid rain and mercury impacts by 90 percent. Decrease the regional carbon program cap by 20 percent. Buy and retire 2,500 tons of carbon pollution credits Increase funding to combat invasive species to $10 million per year. Distribute strong science that strengthens programs and policies to address ecological threats.

Population(s) Served

Well-stewarded privately owned forests and farm land are an important historic and ecological element of the Adirondack Park that contributes significantly to its open space character.
Preserving the open space qualities of large tracts of private land and supporting working forests and farms. Goals include: Increase the acres of private Adirondack forest land where sustainable forestry standards or best management practices are followed. Conserve working forests and working farmland through conservation easements and other programs. Retain at least 5,000 acres of working farmland in the Champlain Valley and the greater Adirondack region.

Population(s) Served

Government agencies, not-for-profit organizations and citizen leadership can and must build a vision for a healthier, and politically, ecologically, economically and socially sustainable and resilient Adirondack Park.

Leading, expanding and diversify the Park’s constituency; advocating and monitoring policies and encouraging citizen engagement to get results that matter for the Adirondacks.

Goals include:

Expand funding in the Environmental Protection Fund from $153 to $250 million/year by 2020.
Support expansion of common ground networks in the Park and across the state.
Produce a new visioning publication for what the Park should look like in the year 2050.
Update the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan.
Actively engage 50,000 constituents for the Park by 2020.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

4-Star Rating 2018

Charity Navigator

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Defending and promoting the wild character and ecological integrity of the Adirondack Park and Forest Preserve.

2. Supporting a better, more resilient, sustainable Adirondack Park, including vibrant local communities.

3. Fighting for clean water and clean air; combating invasive species and climate change.

4. Preserving the open space qualities of large tracts of private land and supporting working forests and farms.

5. Leading, expanding and diversifying the park’s constituency.

The Adirondack Council, using the best science, works to protect and build a better Adirondack Park with wild character and vibrant communities. The Adirondack Council works in collaboration with partners, listening to and understanding diverse opinions, seeking consensus regarding a long-term vision and only standing alone when truly necessary. To achieve our vision for the Park, we sponsor and publish research; educate the public and policy makers; advocate for regulations, policies and funding to benefit the Park’s environment and communities; monitor compliance, proposals, legislation and policies impacting the Park; and, take legal action when necessary to uphold constitutional protections and agency policies established to protect the Adirondacks.

When necessary, we challenge those that fail to protect the Adirondacks. We applaud those who defend, promote and enhance the Adirondacks.

For 45 years the Adirondack Council has worked to protect and build a better Adirondack Park with a wild character and vibrant local communities. It has done so using a full set of tools: science, legal process, public education, persuasion, negotiation, organizing supporters, coalition building, confronting adversaries, social networking, and publishing. The skilled full-time staff with skills and knowledge in conservation, government relations, and advocacy communications, contract professionals with expertise in environmental law, mapping, and other specialty capabilities, and annual interns interested in conservation and advocacy are capable and the Council’s most important asset.

The Adirondack Council from its very beginning assembled individuals and groups interested in the future of the Adirondacks. It continues to collaborate with partners, listen and understand diverse opinions, seek consensus regarding a long-term vision for the Park, and develop relationships with governmental officials and other NGOs. But, it does not hesitate to challenge those whose outlook and actions endanger the ecological integrity and wild character of the Adirondack Park.

Accomplishments: The Adirondack Council played a key role in exposing the connection between acid rain and power plant emissions and has advocated for the Clean Air Act and stronger emission regulations ever since. The Council recently celebrated a successful advocacy result, the addition 35,000 acres of motor-free wilderness to the largest wilderness area in the Adirondacks. The popular High Peaks Wilderness is now 275,000-acres. Since the Clean Water Infrastructure Act passed in 2015, the Adirondack Council’s advocacy has helped secure $53 million in water quality improvement grants for rural Adirondack communities, helping Park communities and keeping sewage and other pollutants out of our lakes, streams and drinking water. The Council recently secured the second is year of $250,000 in state funds for the Adirondack Diversity Initiative to staff and organize a coalition of organizations working to make the Adirondacks more welcoming to all.

What’s Next: The Adirondack Council is working with the state to develop comprehensive planning for Adirondack Park to address overuse, ensure visitor safety, protect natural resources and preserve the wilderness experience. Working with legislative leaders, we are advocating for policies to strengthen policies and programs to mitigate the spread of aquatic invasive species, reduce pollution from road salt, and update private land development policies in the Park. Working with citizens across New York State, we will advocate for a ballot vote and passage of the proposed Restore Mother Nature bond act.

Financials

Adirondack Council
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Adirondack Council

Board of directors
as of 4/16/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Robert Kafin

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No