Adirondack Mountain Club, Inc.

Working for Wilderness

aka ADK   |   Lake George, NY   |  www.adk.org

Mission

ADK (Adirondack Mountain Club) is dedicated to the conservation, preservation, and responsible recreational use of the New York State Forest Preserve and other parks, wild lands, and waters vital to our members and chapters. ADK is the only nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting and advocating for New York State’s wild lands and waters while also teaching people how to enjoy natural places responsibly. Since 1922, the organization has offered people opportunities to stay and play in as well as protect, discover, and explore the outdoors. Today, ADK has 30,000 members in 27 chapters statewide and is served by a professional, year-round staff. The organization is recognized as a vital voice in the commitment to environmental stewardship and ethical outdoor recreation in NY State.

Ruling year info

1958

Executive Director

Mr. Neil F. Woodworth

Chief Operating Officer

Wes Lampman

Main address

814 Goggins Rd

Lake George, NY 12845 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

15-0586270

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

ADK is dedicated to preserving the integrity of the Adirondack Forest Preserve through education, conservation, advocacy, and responsible recreational use. Alpine plants in the Adirondack High peaks are imperiled, due in large part to trampling by hikers. The Adirondack High Peaks Summit Stewardship program, a collaboration between ADK, the Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, works to protect these delicate and rare alpine plant species.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

ADK protects and advocates for New York State's wild lands and waters

ADK's Conservation and Advocacy Program develops policies and implements initiatives that promote the responsible recreational use, protection, stewardship, and acquisition of New York's wild lands, parks and waterways. Working with ADK's Conservation Committee and various chapter conservation committees, our advocacy work advances these goals in the areas of government, legal, and public affairs.
ADK's Education Program provides opportunities for individuals and groups to develop knowledge, skills, understanding, and an appreciation of the natural environment.
ADK's Trails Program promotes land stewardship through the development and maintenance of a quality, all encompassing trail system while encouraging responsible use and protection of New York State's Forest Preserve, Parks and other wild lands and waters.
ADK Recreation Programs promote responsible enjoyment of our natural areas. ADK's 27 chapters located in New York State, New Jersey, and Massachusetts, offer over one thousand recreational activities each year including hiking, canoeing, cross-country skiing, and snowshoeing.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We aim to protect, preserve, and encourage responsible recreational use of the public lands and waters of New York State.

One strategic objective is through the Summit Steward Program, which protects New York’s alpine habitat through education, trail work, and research. Every year, Summit Stewards educate thousands of visitors about the fragile alpine ecosystem found atop the highest mountains in the Adirondacks. We also complete trail projects, annually maintaining hundreds of feet of small scree walls, brushing in areas to aid in restoration, packing loose soil to prevent erosion, maintaining and rebuilding cairns. Summit Stewards participate in research projects, monitoring populations of rare species, using a repeat photography study to evaluate the health of the alpine vegetation, mapping the alpine vegetation, and assisting other research with projects ranging from moss fragments to marten tracking.

Summit Stewards are on Mt. Marcy and Algonquin Peak, the two highest peaks in the state, seven days a week. ADK also provides coverage on Wright Peak (a heavily climbed mountain adjacent to Algonquin) five days a week and Mt. Colden every two weeks. ADK covers Cascade Mt., the most accessible of the 4000’ peaks, on weekends. Finally, Summit Stewards visit every peak with alpine vegetation on it at least once a season to complete monitoring and trail work projects.
Coverage of Cascade Mt represents a huge education opportunity for the Summit Steward program. An additional seasonal steward would also allow the program to expand the number of mountains that are stewarded, including weekday coverage of Cascade Mt. This past summer, stewards spoke to over 8,200 hikers on Cascade in 42 days of coverage. For many, it is the first high Peak they will climb, so introducing a stewardship message at this time can have a tremendous impact on their hiking behavior later.

Summit Stewards are involved in a number of different types of research. This summer, they have conducted the third population sub-sampling of rare, threatened, and endangered alpine species to determine if these plant communities are changing as the climate changes. Stewards also make phenological observations as part of a northeast regional effort to track changes to the life cycle of plants related to climate change. Through the Photopoint Monitoring Project, Summit Stewards track recovery in the alpine ecosystem related to human trampling, which allows for evaluation of the effectiveness of the Summit Steward Program and to help prioritize conservation projects. The previous round of analysis took place in 2009, before the recent surge in hikers. Traditional methods of alpine stewardship to protect the alpine zone have been effective. Continued support for this program will ensure the most traveled peaks are protected for generations to come.

Financials

Adirondack Mountain Club, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Adirondack Mountain Club, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 6/6/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

John Gilewicz

Executive Committee

Term: 2014 - 2015


Board co-chair

Robert Manning

Executive Committee

John Sheehan

Albany Chapter

Steve Baker

Algonquin Chapter

Cynthia Stewart

Black Rock Chapter

James Robertson

Finger Lakes Chapter

Walt Lane

Foothills Chapter

Dean Melville

Hurricane Chapter

Thomas Blackstone

Iroquois Chapter

Betsy Richert

Keenve Valley Chapter

Mike Vetrano

Long Island Chapter

Terri Maxymillian

Lake Placid Chapter

Jean Claude Fourere

Mid-Hudson Chapter

Mary Hilley

New York Chapter

Stephen Opela

Northville-Placid Chapter

Marilyn Gillespie

Northwoods Chapter

John McCoy

Onondaga Chapter

Al Martel

Susquehanna Chapter

John and Kathy Gansfuss

Albany Chapter

Robert Strebel

Binghamton Chapter

Ken Shea

Cold River Chapter

Tammara Van Ryn

Glens Falls-Saratoga Chapter

Bill Wasilauski

Glens Falls-Saratoga Chapter

Beulah Wood

Director Emeritus

Dan Kane

Glens Falls-Saratoga Chapter

Dave and Jill Nichols

Genesee Valley Chapter

Tom Ortmeyer

Laurentian Chapter

Carol Furman

Adirondack Loj Chapter

Ned Gardner

Member-At-Large

Joseph Seymour

Member-At-Large

Fred Wilcox

Member-At-Large

Leslie Millman

Mohican Chapter

Rob Laing

Niagara Frontier Chapter

John Jurasek

NJ-Ramapo Chapter

Jon Bowen

Onondaga Chapter

Roy Keats

Schenectady Chapter

Janet Empsall

Shatagee Woods Chapter

Jim Slavin

Albany Chapter

Phil Erickson

Algonquin Chapter

Patrick Connors

Binghamton Chapter

Janine Johnson

Black River Chapter

Greg and Ellen Schaefer

Cold River Chapter

Jack Langan

Finger Lakes Chapter

Kathi Noble

Glens Falls-Saratoga Chapter

Bill Lindenfelser

Genesee Valley Chapter

Christine Barnes

Hurricane Chapter

Paul Sirtoli

Iroquois Chapter

Lisa Godfrey

Lake Placid Chapter

John Barron

Laurentian Chapter

Michael Vaughn

Long Island Chapter

Debbie Erenstone

Adirondack Loj Chapter

Daniel Jones

Mid-Hudson Chapter

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No