FAMILIES UNITED FOR RACIAL AND ECONOMIC EQUALITY

aka FUREE   |   Brooklyn, NY   |  www.furee.org
This organization has not appeared on the IRS Business Master File in a number of months. It may have merged with another organization or ceased operations.
This organization's exempt status was automatically revoked by the IRS for failure to file a Form 990, 990-EZ, 990-N, or 990-PF for 3 consecutive years. Further investigation and due diligence are warranted.

Mission

Families United for Racial and Economic Equality (FUREE) is a Brooklyn-based multi-racial organization that organizes low-income and working families to promote equality, improve economic conditions, and build collective power to win systemic changes at the local, state and national level. Primarily led by women of color with an emphasis on community and family, FUREE uses direct action, leadership development, community organizing, and political education to achieve our vision and goals.

Ruling year info

2004

Principal Officer

Michelle de la Uz

Main address

388 Atlantic Avenue 2nd Floor

Brooklyn, NY 11217 USA

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EIN

20-0092728

NTEE code info

Minority Rights (R22)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

Voter Education/Registration (R40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Downtown Brooklyn Campaign

The purpose of the Downtown Brooklyn Campaign is to organize for community-led economic development and against gentrification.

All over the United States, developers and corporate interests - aided by politicians at all levels of government - are initiating large-scale building projects in low-income communities that in many instances threaten the social and economic fabric, history and identity of those communities.

In Downtown Brooklyn, the story is no different. The Mayor?s Downtown Brooklyn Plan calls for 5.4 million square feet of ?upscale? office and retail at the Fulton Mall in what is currently a busy, successful retail district that caters to low and middle income Brooklynites, particularly from the Black community. This plan, like many development plans happening around the City, places millions of dollars of public subsidies into the hands of developers who will permanently transform ? and possibly eliminate ? low-income communities.

Residents of Fort Greene, particularly on Myrtle Avenue, directly across Flatbush Avenue from Metrotech, are affected by massive development due to the Downtown Brooklyn Plan?s rezoning. Land that for 30 years held a grocery, Laundromat and a 99-cent housewares store has now been emptied for a development project three years away. Local residents are at a loss without basic services. Senior citizens from the community are forced to travel over 15 city blocks to purchase food and medication. Yet many communities in Brooklyn need public dollars for basic infrastructure and services like schools, housing, parks and job training, not stadiums or skyscrapers.

The existing community which lives, works and shops around Downtown Brooklyn and Fulton Mall has been shut out of the decision making process regarding redevelopment plans for decades. There is ample reason to believe that if these developments are allowed to go forward, the social and economic fabric of the community will be destroyed, and one more Black urban Downtown, rich in history and culture, will fall prey to gentrification. In order to prevent this from happening, FUREE is organizing to build power to make sure development happens for ? not at the expense of ? surrounding low-income communities of color.

Population(s) Served

The Child Care Campaign aims to prevent the mass shutdowns of family day care centers in low-income and working communities while working to win better wages, benefits and working conditions for family day care providers: FUREE is organizing the 8,000 plus licensed family daycare providers who are paid by contract with the City of New York. These workers, the overwhelming majority of whom are women of color, provide subsidized home-based day care (also known as ?family day care?) to low-income families in the City. Child care is recognized as a major factor in community economic development, both as a means to allow parents to work, and as a local industry which employs NYC residents who then spend their money in their communities. Unfortunately, much of this potential is squandered because child care work, particularly for family day care providers, is grossly undervalued. Most family daycare providers paid by the City of New York earn less than $15,000 per year. As a result, a staggering 30% of family daycare providers are forced to leave the sector each year.

Our long term organizing goal is to work in partnership with unions and advocacy and community based organizations to win better wages and working conditions for these caregivers. In the short term, we are building our base through a number of local issues vital to providers? survival. These issues include fighting for increased pay and continuing to pressure the State?s Office of Children & Family Services (OCFS) to change policies that threaten the existence of hundreds of family day care centers.

Population(s) Served

This campaign builds low-income people?s electoral and legislative power. FUREE serves as an anchor organization in NY VOTE, a non-partisan voter engagement coalition of unions, faith-based and community-based organizations. NY VOTE seeks to build low-income and working peoples? capacity to influence the outcome of elections, and bring their voices into local, state and national policy debates. To date, we knocked on 8,000 doors and turned out thousands of infrequent voters in our target neighborhoods. In 2006, we built on our success by turning out more than 2,000 infrequent voters for the gubernatorial race and worked with ally organizations to organize two town hall meetings in Brooklyn with State Assembly and U.S. Congressional representatives and candidates.

Population(s) Served

FUREE has always taken an intergenerational approach to building a community base and platform?our membership is comprised of whole families, including several youth who have grown up in FUREE and participated in meetings, events and actions. In full support of our youth members and in line with the mission of our organization, FUREE designed a youth organizing initiative to promote youth-led change in Brooklyn. We are developing a core of 25 youth who are working on a campaign to open a community center in their neighborhood and actively engaging 100 youth and adults in the process. The initiative builds on the existing strengths of FUREE?s large and growing membership base, demonstrated campaign victories, a strong commitment to leadership development, and a strategy of combining our organizing work with forming strategic coalitions to build our power to win systemic change. It affords low income youth of color intensive organizing and leadership training and incorporates youth development activities including group and individual educational support and college preparation, health and wellness, and artistic expression/creative outlets for our members.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

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Financials

FAMILIES UNITED FOR RACIAL AND ECONOMIC EQUALITY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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FAMILIES UNITED FOR RACIAL AND ECONOMIC EQUALITY

Board of directors
as of 8/20/2018
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Zakiyah Lloyd

Nahyshene Molina

Nitza Nieves

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No