Cambodian Childrens Fund

Transforming country's most impoverished kids into tomorrow leaders

aka CCF   |   Santa Monica, CA   |  www.cambodianchildrensfund.org

Mission

CCF believes that with quality education and leadership, one child has the potential to lift an entire family out of poverty and a generation of educated children has the power to change society. By investing in the health, education and well-being of impoverished children and youth, we are building the skills, confidence and integrity they need to become leaders of positive change in their communities. We take a holistic, on-the-ground approach to developing integrated yet simple solutions to the complex issues of poverty. We work hand-in-hand with local families to deliver support programs, strengthen self-governance and grow safe, supportive communities where children can thrive.

Ruling year info

2004

Principal Officer

Mr. Scott Neeson

Main address

2309 Santa Monica Blvd. PMB #833

Santa Monica, CA 90404 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-0764162

NTEE code info

International Relief (Q33)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2020 and 2019.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CCF was established in 2004 to aid children living and working on the notorious Steung Meanchey garbage dump in Phnom Penh, one of the largest garbage dumps in southeast Asia. It was home to more than 1,500 children and families scavenging for recyclables, while under constant threat of violence, sexual abuse, trafficking, and disease. CCF dedicates itself to helping thousands of vulnerable children escape a world of forced labor, child trafficking and desperate poverty into safety and independence. Children living in slums around the former garbage dump do not have access to food, potable water, healthcare or education. Together, these barriers to social inclusion mean the most impoverished of Cambodians are systematically omitted from a large majority of interventions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education

CCF’s educational facilities provide a high-quality intensive academic curriculum to children once deemed “unreachable” by the public school system. Students focus on developing English, Khmer, mathematics, science and digital literacy skills, while also exploring Cambodian history, arts and culture.

Across CCF, attendance rates average at 97%.

The Neeson Cripps Academy (NCA) opened in 2017, introducing a new level of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) based education in Cambodia. Currently, nearly 400 students study at the NCA, where the public school curriculum is combined with advanced learning spaces and equipment including computer and science labs, 3D printing, robotics and media production.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

CCF’s Leadership Program prepares students for their futures as leaders by equipping them with the tools, training and knowledge to have a meaningful and significant impact on their community. CCF trains students in governance, human rights, gender issues, empathy, community building, critical thinking, communication and other key qualities of leadership. The program runs a range of activities to encourage young leaders to support and empower their communities including trips to rural communities where they run activities that build upon their leadership and social work skills, intensive three-day, peer-lead youth leadership camps, and community support activities such as caring for senior citizens, volunteering as classroom assistants, mentoring younger students and visiting families to advocate for hygienic and safe practices within the home.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The Career and Life Skills (CLS) Program focuses on preparing students for a successful life beyond the education they receive at CCF. It provides career counseling, university scholarships, vocational training, internships and job placement to students in CCF’s care.

CLS is designed to enable young adults to complete tertiary education or vocational education and earn the skills they need to acquire and maintain gainful employment and independence. CCF aims to provide all students with a university education, but we understand that university isn’t for everyone. For students who may most succeed on a path other than university and students who do not qualify for university (including students who arrived at CCF too late to make the grade for university), we offer vocational training. This component of CCF’s programming is invaluable for older children who have come to CCF with limited schooling, as they are unlikely to finish high school and proceed to higher studies.

Our approach is ambitious, starting with self-esteem building and personal management, and culminating with training in work areas that are relevant to Cambodia. Overall, at the beginning of 2020, 81.92% of 166 students who are still in CCF university support programs are either employed or have an internship. The rest of the students without employment/internship are those who have tight study schedules, overseas study, or recent high school completion.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Young adults

Since most families have migrated from rural provinces, they do not always have documentation to claim their citizenship, excluding them from receiving public healthcare. CCF’s medical clinic, the only free medical clinic in Cambodia, provides basic treatment, vaccinations, and minor surgical procedures to more than 8,000 people annually.

Additionally, CCF provides dental and eye care. It is the only free medical clinic of its kind in Cambodia – serving Cambodians of all ages, regardless of their ailments.

CCF’s Maternal Care Program was founded in 2010 to address the persistent issues of maternal and infant death in Steung Meanchey, which are markedly higher than the national average. The program provides pre- and post-natal care, education, counseling, medical supervision,food and transportation assistance. In the program’s first year, infant mortality decreased by 96% in the target population.

By the end of 2020, 1,373 children have been born with no maternal deaths among mothers enrolled in the program.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CCF at times identifies some children as “most at-risk,” if they were abandoned by their families, are violence survivors, or at constant risk of abuse or hunger. Many are referred to CCF by the National Police/Child Protection Unit. For these children, CCF has special 24-hour care facilities, including a nursery. We aim at removing the most at-risk children from the hazardous situation and promoting best welfare including physical and emotional. The program provides support services include provision of safe accommodation, food, healthcare, clothing, educational entertainment, counseling, and so forth.

Recently, due to the safety and stability of CCF’s World Housing villages that have been created for CCF families, and also in accordance with the government’s nationwide strategic plan to reduce children in care facilities and to reunite them with their families or community-based care as a matter of priority, CCF has decided to expand our community-based care project.

Since January 2021, majority of our residential care students has been transferred to community based care, either in foster care, kinship care, or group living. There is only one residential facility remaining open, and it is largely for accommodating children who are in a need for temporary emergency accommodation only.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Young adults

CCF works directly with the families of high-risk children, rather than trying to put a wedge between the kids and their families. Since 2004, we’ve been working with some of the most impoverished communities in Cambodia, centered around the former garbage dump at Steung Meanchey.

While the garbage dump was officially closed in 2009, the need for CCF’s services continues as Steung Meanchey remains an entrypoint into Phnom Penh for destitute families with no option but to try and make a living through scavenging or begging on the city streets. The families that come to CCF for support live in conditions that the World Bank defines as “absolute poverty”. The Community Outreach Program supports these communities in need and brings new hope to destitute children and families. We know that if CCF children are to fully prosper, their families must be supported. Our programs cater to their families and extended communities: from isolated, elderly men and women to people stuck in cycles of substance abuse.

The CCF Community Centre was set up in order to provide reliable care services and support for the Steung Meanchey community, and the development of satellite schools throughout impoverished communities has allowed us to extend our support services to provide for thousands of families. Impoverished people living in the area are provided access to our community services ranging from food, shelter, fresh water, loans, healthcare, childcare, counselling and advocacy, social bonding events, housing and other necessary provisions.

CCF established Community Based Care Project in 2015. The aim is to get children who are at risk in their family and community to another new family and community environment where care, safety, and opportunities for schooling and other human development services are provided. CCF families who are stable and have the capacity to take on additional children are considered for CCF’s extended foster care program. The foster parents are responsible for providing basic needs for the children including comfortable shelter, sufficient food, clean water, clothing, etc., and are entrusted with the protection of the children from child labor, trafficking, exploitation, abuse, neglect, violence, discrimination, use of drugs and other substances, and practices that put them at risk. These families are supported with additional food, rice and funding to be able to successfully take care of the foster children and provide the safe, loving family environment they need.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Q Prize 2007

Harvard School of Public Health & Quincy Jones

Bill Graham Award for Children's Rights 2007

Rex Foundation

Peace Award 2008

Ambassadors for Children

ASEAN award for Outstanding Social Welfare and Development in Cambodia 2022

ASEAN

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

From kindergarten to high school including Education Assistant Package

Number of students who graduated high school

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Annually

Number of students showing interest in topics related to STEM

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of students enrolled in STEM Clubs

Number of youth who demonstrate leadership skills (e.g., organizing others, taking initiative, team-building)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Leadership

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of youth who lead program activities

Number of nursery children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Related Program

Childcare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of high school graduates who are persisting in college

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Career and Life Skills

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of students who graduated high school going to tertiary education

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Career and Life Skills

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of new employment placements of the year, both university and vocational

Number of treatments and consultations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Health

Related Program

Healthcare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Annual figure.

Number of houses built

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Community Outreach

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Accumulative total figure of houses provided to the community

Number of children placed in foster homes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Community Outreach

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

# of placement each year

Number of Community people receiving support from CCF

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Community Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of grannies enrolled in CCF 'Granny Program'

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors

Related Program

Community Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of community people participated in community trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Community Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Community training was not available in 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Number of participants who felt that they have been provided with a range of options for future employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Career and Life Skills

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of students receive career counseling.

Number of children in Residential Care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Childcare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

As a result of the expansion of community based care project.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CCF aims to transform the country's most impoverished kids into tomorrow's leaders, by delivering education, family support and community development programs into the heart of Cambodia's most impoverished communities.

By investing in the health, education and well- being of impoverished children and youth, we are building the skills, confidence and integrity they need to become leaders of positive change in their communities.

We take a holistic, on-the-ground approach to developing integrated yet simple solutions to the complex issues of poverty. We work hand-in-hand with local families to deliver support programs, strengthen self-governance and grow safe, supportive communities where children can thrive.

Our mantra is that the suffering of these children ends with this generation. We believe that with the right education and support, one child has the potential to lift an entire family out of poverty and that a generation of educated children has the power to change a whole society. Through intensive, long-term investments in children, CCF is helping students build the skills, confidence and integrity they need to become the progressive leaders of change in their communities.

Our approach is based on a fundamental belief that education will provide children pathways out of poverty and that by developing the leadership potential of our students, leaders will emerge that will create generational change and a better future for Cambodia.

At CCF, the child is the nucleus of our programs, but the change sought is broader. We invest in each child’s development of a mindset of eagerness to use the skills they have developed to bring positive change into their communities. Such an undertaking requires a range of interdependent community services and programs, from clean water and nutrition to learning local values and history, to developing the skills and resources necessary to achieve independence. Our approach to poverty reduction and community development is based on three key principles:

1. Access to quality education for those who have fallen outside the public school generational cycle of poverty;

2. Removing the barriers to education, addressing urgent food, clean water and healthcare needs, and addressing issues such as domestic violence, to ensure that the access to quality education is most effective;

3. If children are to prosper, their families must be supported, so CCF spends a great deal of time and energy in creating a community environment around the children that is safe, caring and supportive. This environment in-tills pride, integrity and respect into community members.

CCF offers simple but innovative solutions to deal with the complex issues and deeply rooted challenges of poverty. It is consistently generating a path to higher education and employment for the poorest and most vulnerable of Cambodians by creating an environment where food security, housing and health care remove the most ingrained barriers to education. Merely creating classrooms was never going to be enough; children would soon be pressured to go back to work in order to support their struggling families.

In our approach to community development, CCF operates 64 inter-connected projects across six core program areas – Education, Leadership, Community Outreach, Healthcare, Childcare and Career & Life Skills. While not all programs are education-focused, each plays an essential part in ensuring children (once labeled “unreachable," by the public school system) and their families are prepared for and have access to the supports needed to support participation in a high-quality education.

CCF's talented team is made up of passionate and skilled individuals from all over the globe with diverse backgrounds, and along with the support of dedicated sponsors, donors and volunteers, the entire team is dedicated to ensuring CCF's programs are transforming lives.

CCF’s five international offices work diligently to encourage support of CCF’s mission across the globe.

More than 97% of CCF's 450 staff are Cambodian, many from the Steung Meanchey community, including local mothers who are hired and trained as childcare staff, and former CCF students who have graduated and seek employment with CCF in hopes of helping younger generations of students just as those older helped them.

Additionally, CCF has formal partnerships with numerous government ministries, local hospitals, medical clinics, schools, colleges, universities and other NGO's (Marie Stopes – Maternal Health, Pour un Sourire d'Enfant – vocational training, World Housing – secure accommodation, Reproductive Health Association Of Cambodia – healthcare check-ups for child victims of rape, Australian Centre for Education – English language training for staff and students, University of Nottingham) and more than 200 Phnom Penh businesses that provide internships and employment opportunities to CCF students. Additionally, international corporate partners such as Velcro Companies, Credit Suisse, GE, and Microsoft provide financial support while also providing critical capacity development, e.g. skilled employee volunteers, equipment, supplies and technical expertise.

Since 2004, we have successfully supported more than 2,900 Steung Meanchey children and over 8,000 family and community members with our poverty reduction model. Statistical data provided (2015) by the local authorities indicates there are 16 villages in Steung Meanchey. There are 11,930 families and a total population of 75,121 people. CCF operates in four of the poorest of these villages where there are 4,537 families and a total population of 26,898. CCF’s services are reaching 30% of the local population at various points of ground-level contact. As a model for replication, escalation of reach at 30% of the population in Cambodia alone could reach 600,000 of the 2.2m Cambodians living under the national poverty line.

In 2019, 16.7% of females in Cambodia aged 18-24 were enrolled in university. At the same time 76% of CCF females of that age were enrolled in university. CCF’s model intrinsically drives gender equality placing girls, young women, single mothers and grandmothers at the heart of the model, providing access to internationally recognized academic curricula and resources, maternal care, social housing and community and cultural services.

As of today, 7 CCF students (all female) have been successful in obtaining international university scholarships to study their undergraduate degree in Australia and France.

Of the first 210 students to join CCF, 88% are at university (22% going onto vocational training or being reintegrated with families prior to completing Grade 12 with CCF).

By 2020, a total of 94 students have graduated from University since the first year of graduation inauguration. Of the 12 graduated students in 2020, and 99% of these students are on employment.

According to the spread of COVID19, either international and local Robotic competition has been postponed, but CCF arranged the Internal Robotics competition held at NCA with senior and junior categories within 40 participants.

The introduction of a STEM curriculum coincides with CCF’s long term strategy to improve the quality of education. The NCA will be the flagship of CCF’s STEM curriculum where hands-on, experiential classes will be taught. This advanced learning center also focuses on teacher training of CCF teachers as well as educators from the whole country, essential to build capacity so teachers have the skills to produce quality education for all Cambodian children. The NCA offers a real opportunity to effectively enhance Cambodia’s education quality across all levels, from primary to graduate school.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Impoverished children and communities of Steung Meanchey former dumpsite.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    CCF takes feedback from community members, relevant stakeholders, and partners seriously. Through feedback from our community students on the community environment, CCF carried out a student-led project "Waste Management Project" where our students were involved in the waste management and recycling process in their community. CCF's Child Protection Unit (CPU) has become a member of the Cambodia National Council for Children as the result of the feedback through our partnership with the Cambodian National Police. CCF-CPU has actively contributed to Cambodian Action Plan to Prevent and Respond to Violence Against Children. CCF responded to the global concern on residential facilities by integrating children in residential care to community-based care including foster care.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Independent researcher/evaluator,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our programs and projects were developed in response to the need of the communities we serve. We listen to their problems and provide our support.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Cambodian Childrens Fund
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Cambodian Childrens Fund

Board of directors
as of 4/26/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr Warren Share

Cambodian Children's Fund

Warren Share

Warren is a Fixed Income Sales Manager for BNY Mellon Capital Markets. Previously, he was an attorney specializing in real estate & commercial litigation. Warren has been a mentor to children in the NYC area for the past 11 years and sponsors two CCF students. He's been involved with CCF since 2011

Tom Zuber

Tom Zuber is Managing Partner at Zuber Lawler, a corporate law firm headquartered in Los Angeles, with additional offices in Austin, Chicago, Denver, New York, Phoenix, and Silicon Valley.

Cammie Rice

Cammie is a senior level executive in the technology and financial service industries. She is the Vice Chairman of Usher’s New Look Foundation. She and her husband sponsor three children.

Scott Neeson

Scott is the Founder & Executive Director of CCF. After 26 years in the film industry, Scott's final position was as the president of 20th Century Fox International. He then moved to Cambodia to set up Cambodian Children's Fund.

Matt Greene

Matt Greene resides in Hawaii. He co-founded Red Leaf Resources as its initial investor in 2005 and served as CFO until 2013. Matt founded a family foundation, the MJG Foundation. Matt and his family sponsor four children.

Ralph Sudfeld

Ralph was named the President & CEO of Assist International in May 2015. For the past five years, Ralph has led Assist International in the growth and development of their partnerships with in-country programs that target the needs of vulnerable children, through orphan village development and edu.

Jeffrey Shiu

Jeffrey Shiu, Senior Managing Director, is the Head of Innovative Equity Ventures team in Macquarie Capital. Jeff is based in Seattle and is responsible for IEV’s global strategy and relationships.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/24/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability