Arts, Culture, and Humanities

PRINCE WILLIAM HISTORIC PRESERVATION FOUNDATION INC

  • Dumfries, VA
  • http://www.preservepw.org

Mission Statement

We proudly support Prince William County's efforts to preserve our past and fund projects that restore county-owned historic properties and structures.
Prince William, Virginia

Main Programs

  1. The Brentsville Jail
  2. Rippon Lodge
  3. Ben Lomond Historic Site
  4. Brentsville Courthouse Historic Centre
  5. Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park

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Service Areas

Self-reported

Virginia

Prince William County Virginia

ruling year

2006

President of the Board of Directors

Self-reported

Mark Trbovich

Co Principal Officer

Self-reported

Meaghan Reddick

Keywords

Self-reported

Historic Preservation, Restoration, and Education

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Also Known As

PWHPF

EIN

20-1076906

 Number

0192828609

Physical Address

Williams Ordinary 17674 Main Street

Dumfries, VA 22026

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Historical Societies and Related Activities (A80)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

The Brentsville Jail

T o restore the Brentsville Jail and to create museum exhibits at the jail as well as to provide interpretive services for the “ Old Jail”, which is the final building to be restored at the 29 acres Brentsville Courthouse Historic Centre, an open-air museum centered around the restored 1820s courthouse. The “Old Jail”, has a colorful and tragic history, and among other things, will be used to interpret seventy years of murder and mayhem in early Prince William County.

The Brentsville Jail Museum will house a number of period rooms such as the Jailor’s Office, Maximum Security Cell, Debtor’s Cell, Victorian era dormitory (reflecting the building’s history as a school), and a Korean War era master bedroom (reflecting the building’s history as a private residence). Each of the ten exhibit spaces will have a special focus. Some of the themes include 19th century crime and punishment, the history of slavery and African American history, historic architecture and building techniques, and local history.

One of the old jail cells on the first floor will recreate a furnished jail cell of the early 19th century. Brendon Hanafin, the county’s Historic Preservation Division Chief, says, “We’re going to make these rooms so they’re like what they looked like then. They were dark. There was no ventilation. There was no heating, no cooling, little windows, and bars on the doors. So you’re going to walk into these things, and you’re going to be immersed in how horrible it would have been to have been in there.”

The “Old Jail” at Brentsville will be one of only a handful of jails in the nation that have been restored to the look and feel of pre-Civil War America, and the only one in the Washington D.C. Metro region.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Adults

Budget

400,000

Program 2

Rippon Lodge

Rippon Lodge is one of the oldest known homes in Prince William County. Built circa 1747 by Richard Blackburn, the house is situated between Neabsco Creek, the Potomac River, and the historic King's Highway (present day Route 1). Mr. Blackburn, and his son Thomas, had extensive land holdings in the county where they grew tobacco, wheat, and other commodities. With the home located just north of the bustling port town of Dumfries, the Blackburn's could easily export their goods and merchandise to England. Mr. Blackburn and Thomas were both active in local politics, and Thomas served in the Revolutionary War as a militia member.



By 1842, the Atkinson Family called Rippon Lodge home for about 90 years before the property was sold to Wade Ellis in 1924. Ellis, and his wife Dessie, purchased 500 acres and began extensive renovations to the home, turning it into the Colonial Revival residence visitors see today. Ellis, a prominent lawyer from Washington D.C., is regarded as being responsible for preserving much of the history of Rippon Lodge.



005022.jpg Admiral Richard Blackburn Black, the last private owner of Rippon Lodge, purchased the home in 1952, and continued to preserve the home and history as Wade Ellis had. Admiral Black was a direct descendent of the original builder Richard Blackburn, and has been linked to many important historical events, including his exploration of Antarctica with Admiral Richard Byrd. Admiral Black's daughter sold the property to Prince William County in 2000.

Extensive restoration work began at Rippon Lodge soon after, and was completed in 2007 when the site opened for public tours. Rippon Lodge Historic Site consists of 43-acres, the Blackburn and Atkinson Family cemetery, formal gardens, and walking trails. The site interprets the history of the house and owners from 1747 to 2000. Visitors are welcome to stroll the grounds and gardens. Stunning views of the Potomac River allow for boat and bird watching of all kinds.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Adults

Budget

Program 3

Ben Lomond Historic Site

Originally part of an extensive Northern Virginia land grant, the site of Ben Lomond was one of numerous plantations that Robert “Councillor” Carter III owned in Colonial Virginia. After Carter died his large land-holdings were divided amongst his heirs. One, Benjamin Tasker Chinn, inherited the site of Ben Lomond in 1830 and within two years had built the two story main house along with the dairy, smokehouse, and slave quarter. Chinn leased the property out the Pringle family prior to the Civil War. Both the Chinns and Pringles used their enslaved workforce to farm corn and wheat and to care for the nearly 500 Merino sheep that were part of the property.


006087.jpgImmediately after the Battle of 1st Manassas the house was converted into a Confederate field hospital. For nearly a month wounded soldiers were crammed into the house with many more covering the grounds. Confederate troops encamped near the house in the winter, requiring the house to be re-established as a hospital treating diseased men. After the Confederates evacuated the area in 1862, Federal soldiers ransacked the house, destroying furniture and littering the interior with graffiti.

E.A Craighill was a medical aid at Ben Lomond after the Battle of 1st Manassas.


006089.jpgAfter the Civil War, both the Chinns and Pringles struggled to rebuild. Eventually, the Chinns sold the property. A succession of various owners called Ben Lomond home, including John F. Rixey, chief doctor to President Theodore Roosevelt.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Program 4

Brentsville Courthouse Historic Centre

The Town of Brentsville was established on 50 acres in 1820 to become the County seat of Prince William County. By 1820, many residents had moved farther west for better farm land and the old county seat of Dumfries was too far east for the western residents to travel conveniently. The new town of Brentsville was centrally located in Prince William County along the major east/west road that led from the port of Dumfries to the Shenandoah Valley. In 1893, the county seat moved to Manassas and Brentsville became a rural community, which allowed it to retain much of its 19th century character.

What is Here Today?

The 28-acre Brentsville Courthouse Historic Centre includes five historic buildings: 1822 courthouse, 1822 jail, 1874 church, 1850 farmhouse, and a one-room schoolhouse built in 1928. There is also a mile-long nature trail that traverses the park. There are also places to picnic.



Brentsville in the Civil War



Brentsville was the Prince William County seat during the Civil War. In response to John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry in 1859, the Prince William Cavalry (Co. A Virginia Cavalry) was formed here on the courthouse lawn in January 1860. The ladies of Brentsville made a flag and presented it to the company. Other Confederate units from Prince William County such as Ewell Guards (Co. A. 49th Virginia Infantry) were organized and drilled here.



Like many Virginian towns, Brentsville suffered heavily at the hands of both armies. Confederate General Eppa Hunton, a Brentsville resident and lawyer, had his house and other buildings destroyed. The Hampton Legion, among other units, was posted here on scouting missions. Several homes and churches served as hospitals. The county clerk's office was torn down and its bricks used for camp chimneys. Part of the ca. 1822 courthouse roof was torn off and many county records were either destroyed or taken by soldiers as souvenirs. Capt. Andrew McHenry of the 13th Pennsylvania Infantry wrote of Brentsville in 1864 "the houses generally are in ruin."



The Battle of Bristoe Station fought three miles west on Oct. 14 1863 brought combat to Brentsville's doorstep. During the battle, Federal General John Buford's cavalry was posted here to protect the Federal supply train. Confederate partisan units operate in Brentsville until the end of the war.



Brentsville Timeline



1686- Brent Town Grant made by King James II to Brent family including present location of Brentsville

1779- Commonwealth of Virginia confiscates the land from the Bristow family due to their British loyalties

1779-1820- Land was rented by the Commonwealth for farming and timber

1820- Town of Brentsville established by the Virginia General Assembly as the new Prince William County seat

1822- Brentsville courthouse, jail, clerk of court's office, and tavern completed

1853 Samuel Haislip built a new farmhouse off of Vint Hill Road now located on Brentsville site

1861 (April 1) Prince William County magistrates vote to endorse Virginia's secession

1862 (March 3) Last day of court in Prince William County until end of war

1870 (Oct. 17) First County Board of Supervisors meeting in courthouse with five supervisors

1874 Brentsville Union Church completed

1893 County seat moved to Manassas

1928 Brentsville one room schoolhouse built for grades 1-5 school was previously held in the courthouse

2004 Prince William County Historic Preservation Division assumes management of site

2006 Courthouse and Union Church restored

2008 Haislip/Hall house restored

2010 Jail stabilization begins

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Adults

Budget

Program 5

Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park

Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park is a 140-acre historic site in western Prince William County. Park grounds and trails are open every day from sunrise to sunset free of charge. Guided tours are offered at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. on the second and fourth weekend of the month from May through October. Special group tours can be arranged by calling 703-366-3049. No restroom concessions or camping facilities are available on site.

Here, Federal and Confederate soldiers fought the Battle of Kettle Run on August 27, 1862 and the Battle of Bristoe Station on October 14, 1863.

This peaceful landscape features more than 2.7 miles of walking and equestrian trails. Wildlife abounds in the fields, woods, and ponds.

What Happened Here?

A quiet section of Prince William County for hundreds of years, during the American Civil War two battles and numerous troop encampments occurred at Bristoe Station. While small compared to other Civil War battles, the August 1862 Battle of Kettle Run and the October 1863 Battle of Bristoe Station produced hundreds of casualties that were felt from Minnesota to New York and from North Carolina to Louisiana. Evidence of people who occupied this land remains in the park's road traces, buildings, and cemeteries.



Civil War Encampments

Drawn by the railroad and the nearby water supply, from 1861 through 1864 numerous encampments sprang up around Bristoe Station. After 1st Manassas a large Confederate encampment known as Camp Jones spread throughout the fields at Bristoe. Later many Federal camps were located here, with the largest being made by Pennsylvanians in 1863.
Battle of Kettle Run

In August 1862 the Civil War returned to Prince William County. As part of the 2nd Manassas Campaign, Confederate soldiers under Stonewall Jackson captured the railroad at Bristoe Station before capturing the warehouses of food at Manassas. On the afternoon of August 27, 1862 the small, but deadly, Battle of Kettle Run was fought at Bristoe Station, the first of a series of battles known as 2nd Manassas.
Battle of Bristoe Station

In the fall of 1863 both the Northern and Southern armies were recuperating after the Battle of Gettysburg. After troops from both armies were sent west to Tennessee, Confederate General Robert E. Lee attempted to repeat his 2nd Manassas Campaign. Unlike the previous August, Lee's campaign was defeated on October 14, 1863 at the Battle of Bristoe Station.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Service Areas

Self-reported

Virginia

Prince William County Virginia

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Operations

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PRINCE WILLIAM HISTORIC PRESERVATION FOUNDATION INC

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

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  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
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President of the Board of Directors

Mark Trbovich

Co Principal Officer

Meaghan Reddick

STATEMENT FROM THE President of the Board of Directors

"We proudly support Prince William County's efforts to preserve our past and fund projects that restore county-owned historic properties and structures. "

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mark Trbovich

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

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BOARD COMPOSITION

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BOARD PERFORMANCE

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