ALS Association Nevada Chapter

aka ALS of Nevada   |   Las Vegas, NV   |  www.alsanv.org

Mission

To discover treatments and a cure for ALS, and to serve, advocate for, and empower people affected by ALS to live their lives to the fullest throughout the state of Nevada.

Ruling year info

1990

Executive Director

Ms. April Mastroluca

Main address

3191 E Warm Springs Rd

Las Vegas, NV 89120 USA

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Formerly known as

ALS of Nevada

EIN

20-1531344

NTEE code info

Neurology, Neuroscience (G96)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Respite Program

In home care for ALS patients relieving care givers. Licensed home health agencies are paid for by The ALS Association Nevada Chapter

Population(s) Served
People with physical disabilities
Caregivers

Patients come to the clinic every 3-6 months. Clinic is once a month and offers a neurologist, dietitian, social worker, speech pathologist, occupational therapist, respiratory therapist, LPN.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We have various types of large and small equipment that we loan or give to patients and families to help them with their ALS. These items include manual and power wheelchairs, toileting and shower chairs, foam tubing, zipper pulls, special bowls and cups, etc.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Caregivers

As the disease progresses, people with ALS will lose the ability to speak and therefore will not be able to communicate with their loved ones and their caregivers. The communications program allows them to try different types of communication devices before they need them to discover which one will work best. Once a person has lost the ability to speak, it is difficult for them to learn how to use a device. The program is designed to be proactive.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Thanks to funding from the Christopher Reeve Foundation and seed money donated by TeamCurtis4aCure, we are now able to provide funds for transportation for medical and non-medical trips including: monthly multidisciplinary ALS clinics, restaurant visits, museum trips, art and music events, movies, sporting events, and family events.

Population(s) Served
People with physical disabilities
Caregivers

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Henderson Chamber of Commerce Member 2020

Chamber of Commerce Reno Sparks 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of timely caseworker visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total Care Coordinator engagements per year.

Number of support groups offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number of support groups decreased in 2020 due to the pandemic and moving to virtual support groups.

Number of respite hours provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Respite Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of respite hours provided were reduced due to the pandemic and families not wanting to have people in their homes.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our Guiding Principles are:
People with ALS and their families come first
One team, one vision, one mission
Accountability and transparency
Diversity and inclusion
Open communication and dialogue
Innovation
Collaboration

Strategic Outcomes:
Recognized interdependence between care and research.

People with ALS and their families have:
Access to consistent care, treatment and services
Resource and support services that enhance quality of life
Quality care and support leveraged by collaboration with partners

We strive to have collaboration between our three monthly ALS clinics to ensure we are providing consistent care. To accomplish this; our staff attends each clinic every month, we provide stipends to cover services that may be missing, and we provide the same follow up for each patient, regardless of where in the state they are living.

Our support services are designed with the end user in mind. We survey the patients and families every 2 years to see if the services we are offering are beneficial to them.

Our staff has been building relationships in the community with other organizations who we can partner with to fill in any gaps in service that may exist.

Our staff members are professionals in their fields and are in a position to accomplish our institutional goals. In addition, our board members have connections in the healthcare community and help us in reaching out to find additional resources and partnerships.

We provide support and services to over 130 people with ALS. In addition we provide services and support to their families. This is an increase from 2014 when we were serving 65 people in Nevada with ALS. Our outreach to the community has been a success. We recently added a communication program which will allow ALS patients to try out various types of communication equipment before they actually need it. Once a person has lost their ability to speak, it is very difficult to teach them how to use a communication device. This program will proactively help the patient and families discover the best resource for themselves before investing in an expensive piece of equipment they don't know how to use.

Out next steps include expanding our support groups to have additional groups for caregivers and for children. We are also working on a Kids Day Out program that will take children and grandchildren of ALS patients to an activity that will allow them to be a kid for a day. Many times, children end up acting as caregivers for their parents or grandparents and we want them to have a few days during the year where they can have fun and connect with other kids in the same situation.

We are starting plans for a training room where caregivers can come and see what equipment is available for use in the home and they can receive training on the equipment if necessary.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

ALS Association Nevada Chapter
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ALS Association Nevada Chapter

Board of directors
as of 1/21/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

John Houston

MVTRAC

Term: 2020 - 2022

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/21/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/21/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.