Zaman International

Hope for Humanity

aka Zaman International   |   Inkster, MI   |  www.zamaninternational.org

Mission

To facilitate change and advance the lives of marginalized women and children, by enabling them to meet essential needs common to all humankind.

Ruling year info

2005

CEO

Mrs. Najah Bazzy RN

Main address

26091 Trowbridge St

Inkster, MI 48141 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-1946065

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Zaman serves severely impoverished and/or crisis-stricken women through its urgent needs and job skills training programs. Our objective is to break the cycle of generational poverty by stabilizing female heads-of-household through the provision of food, clothing, shelter, and other essential needs and helping them obtain the skills, tools, and resources necessary to become self-reliant. Zaman’s work is concentrated in Inkster, Dearborn, and Dearborn Heights, urban areas bordering the city of Detroit. This part of southeast Michigan has been slow to benefit from the positive effects of the state’s economic recovery, resulting in high unemployment, stagnating wages, and increasing poverty rates. These conditions are exacerbated by substandard public transportation, few options for reliable, affordable childcare, and a lack of lucrative employment opportunities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Bayt Al Zahra

A crisis assistance center and “one-stop-shop” for wrap-around services in the form of food, clothing, and household goods.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adults

The adult literacy and vocational sewing programs offer tuition-free classes to clients to help them secure the skill sets needed to enter the job market or start a small business.

The Culinary Arts Kitchen is a no-cost multi-level curriculum teaching skills in food preparation, safe handling, and nutrition education readying students for food industry jobs. The kitchen also provides hot meals for clients and teaches age-appropriate community cooking classes.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Immigrants and migrants

The Plots for Tots Infant Burial Program assists families that cannot afford a proper funeral for their fetus, infant, or toddler by providing a free burial plot and bereavement services.

Population(s) Served
Families

Located within the Hope for Humanity Center, the shop supplies free items to clients in crises and is open to the public with purchases supporting Zaman’s programs and overhead

Population(s) Served
Families

Donor-guided campaigns conducted in partnership with International Medical Corps to support disaster relief in communities around the world.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Helps children in greater Detroit who have lost one parent with assistance that may include stipends, backpacks, coats, and other essentials.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, People of African descent, People of Middle Eastern descent

Related Program

Bayt Al Zahra

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number of beneficiaries receiving food from client choice pantry. Beneficiaries increased significantly in 2020 and 2021 because we provided food to people in the community in addition to clients

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Meals served through the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP). Numbers dipped in 2020 because of COVID.

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Financial donations received from individuals through campaigns and direct asks.

Number of clients still enrolled after the first week of training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People of Middle Eastern descent, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, People of African descent

Related Program

Building Ongoing Opportunities through Skills Training (BOOST)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Numbers dipped in 2020 and 2021 because of COVID.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Zaman’s goal is to break the cycle of generational poverty by stabilizing female heads of household. We give women living in extreme poverty the skills, tools, and resources necessary to secure consistent wages and achieve self-reliance.

Zaman believes the most effective way to break the cycle of generational poverty and help marginalized women with dependents realize opportunities is through a two-step intervention of stabilization and skills training. Under the guidance and close supervision of a caseworker, clients turning to Zaman in crisis or extreme poverty complete a self-assessment survey identifying their immediate needs and longer-term personal goals. Zaman furnishes material items (e.g., food, shelter, clothing, utility assistance, school supplies) for up to 12 months to stabilize clients and their families. Clients are then offered literacy instruction and job skills training to help them obtain reliable income to support themselves and their dependents.

As Michigan’s unemployment rate continues to decline, employers are challenged to find workers with the skills, education, and training to fill no fewer than 90,000 jobs. Topping the list of vacancies are positions in the construction, manufacturing, health care, and service industries. If Michigan doesn’t address its workforce needs, the state’s continued economic recovery could be jeopardized.
Employers, economists, and academics agree that recruiting women for non-traditional occupations and providing hands-on training are essential to help solve the labor shortage. The TA Zaman offers through its pre-apprenticeship programs focus on preparing women for jobs in the service and manufacturing industries – specifically, culinary arts and sewing. Additionally, we provide wraparound assistance, job-readiness skills, and literacy. As we work with a large Middle Eastern North African immigrant population, we also offer ESL and help our clients acclimate to their new home.

With a $60,000 grant from Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan, two grants totaling $84,000 from Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), and donations of equipment, and supplies, Zaman launched literacy and sewing programs in January 2016. We also received curriculum development and evaluation expertise from more than 20 community-based partners.
During our first year, Zaman trained 70 women, refined its multi-level curricula, incorporated entrepreneurial, financial and physical/behavioral health workshops, outfitted 22 sewing stations, acquired a paper-based and electronic library of 15 multi-level, integrated instructional series, and provided students with community-based service projects and sales opportunities to earn income from their handmade items. Nearly three-quarters of the first-year literacy students advanced to a higher literacy level, while 80 percent of sewing students advanced to higher skill levels. In its sophomore year, 18 percent of graduates reported being employed. The strength of our literacy and sewing program outcomes gives us confidence about advancing our culinary arts program.

Zaman’s story is one of vision-guided growth, beginning in 1996. Zaman CEO and founder, Najah Bazzy, encountered desperate poverty in metro Detroit while making house calls to refugees and immigrants as a registered nurse. Starting with family members and friends, Bazzy mobilized a grassroots network of donors willing to provide necessities to these marginalized families. This humble initiative grew steadily to become Zaman International. Today, Zaman has assisted more than 247,493 local families and nearly two-million individuals through its international work.

In 2016, Zaman established the Hope for Humanity Center, a 40,000 square-foot building in Inkster. It is the organization’s headquarters and houses the crisis assistance center and resale store as well as the culinary arts, sewing, and literacy training hub. Hundreds of women have benefitted from its programs, moving further along the continuum toward self-reliance.

Looking forward, Zaman is continuing to build the infrastructure necessary to be a world-class workforce development center for the women it serves. In 2019, it was designated as an apprenticeship program by the Department of Labor, which means it can offer a more robust, paid, and accredited training opportunity. Capital improvements to create a commercial sewing studio and expand the culinary arts training kitchen will allow the organization to grow the apprenticeship program and enhance the learning experience for all students.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Zaman targets crisis-stricken women with serious hurdles to employment. Even with government assistance, nearly 100% of them live below the federal poverty level, earning less than $12,000/yr. Zaman's work concentrates on Inkster, Dearborn, and Dearborn Heights, urban areas bordering Detroit. Data from 2018 documents Inkster's unemployment rate as 7.5%, among the highest in Michigan. Conversely, Dearborn and Dearborn Heights rates are among the lowest at 3.3 and 3.7%, respectively. According to the ACS, poverty rates in Inkster, Dearborn, and Dearborn Heights are 33.2, 29.1, and 19.2%, respectively—all among the highest in the state. This suggests that while Dearborn and Dearborn Heights' unemployment rates are low, many families are not earning enough to change their economic reality.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Changes occurring as a result of feedback include loaning Chromebooks to clients enrolled in the literacy and vocational training programs because many of them did not have access to reliable technology. Zaman also hired a digital literacy coordinator to help students with remote learning because many of them said they needed help navigating a virtual environment.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Zaman has always sought client feedback, so nothing has changed in our relationship. Our use of the feedback we receive makes the people we serve feel honored, respected, and cared for. Our "client at the core" philosophy centers their needs, and we seek to create an environment that prioritizes their cultural needs. As a result, they are comfortable coming to our center and talking candidly with staff about their goals.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Zaman International
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Zaman International

Board of directors
as of 03/10/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Gehad Alawan


Board co-chair

Dr. Colleen Ezzeddine

Moheeb Murray

Bush Seyferth & Paige PLLC

Gehad Alawan

Nader Bazzi

Najah Bazzy

Zaman International

Colleen Ezzeddine

Joffer Hakim

St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Oakland

Sumreen Ahmad

Accenture

Farah Harb

Ford Motor Company Fund

Amanda Jawad

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Arab
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/16/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.