Public, Society Benefit

OPERATION SECOND CHANCE INC

  • Germantown, MD
  • www.operationsecondchance.org

Mission Statement

We are patriotic citizens committed to serving our wounded, injured and ill combat veterans. We support Veterans and their families by building relationships and identifying and supporting immediate needs and interests. We are dedicated to promoting public awareness of the many sacrifices made by our Armed Forces.

Main Programs

  1. Operation Giving Back
  2. Morale, Welfare and Recreation
  3. Essential Daily Assistance
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

Our veterans literally put their lives on the line to protect our freedoms. Some of them come back with terrible wounds and struggle to make ends meet on a day-to-day basis. At Operation Second Chance, we give our wounded veterans the financial and emotional support they need to pay their rent, fix their cars, or even feed their families. OSC has provided assistance to veterans in nearly every state in the nation and Puerto Rico.

ruling year

2005

President and Founder

Self-reported

Cindy McGrew

Keywords

Self-reported

Wounded, injured, ill, service members, military, veterans, family

Notes from the Nonprofit

Operation Second Chance is celebrating over 10 years of service to our wounded, injured and ill Veterans, and we are reminded daily that our mission must continue. When we turn on the news, we hear that the war is winding down. Yet the reality of what we really need to hear more of is despite the fact that the war is winding down, “wounds last a lifetime." Our families need us now more than ever!

It is estimated that 1 in 5 Veterans suffer from PTS. Notice I left off the “D." Even though the “D" stands for “Disorder," We personally believe that the final letter should be “I" for “Injury." Post-traumatic stress can affect anyone who has had personal experience with a tragic event. Smells, sounds, anniversary dates and other related circumstances can trigger flashbacks, nightmares, and increased emotions just to name a few.

Back-to-back multiple deployments have also taken a toll on our Veterans. War does not discriminate. When a family member is wounded, those wounded trickle down to the youngest members of the family. At Operation Second Chance, we are doing our best to change lives and to help our best to change lives and to help our heroes move on with dignity and love. We continue to provide emergency financial assistance for a wide range of needs, from rent and utility payments, to travel and groceries. We provide awesome retreats and day trips to get our Veterans out of the hospital. We offer caregiver and spa days, family bowling nights and so much more.

We have maintained the “grassroots" approach and never want to lose sight of where we came from or where we are going. My life has been so blessed over the years. Not a day passes when I don't cry for our Veterans and wish I could do even more. I love our Veterans for all they stand for. I love our Veterans for their selflessness, their service and their sacrifice, and we will never forget those Veterans that paid the ultimate price for our freedom, or the families that mourn them. It is with heartfelt thanks that I thank everyone who supports Operation Second Chance and our Veterans. May God continue to richly bless America and those that serve our great Nation.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014.
Register now

EIN

20-2624345

 Number

1821738514

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Military/Veterans' Organizations (W30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

We are patriotic citizens committed to serving our wounded, injured and ill combat veterans. We support Veterans and their families while they recover in military hospitals, by building relationships and identifying and supporting immediate needs and interests. We are dedicated to promoting public awareness of the many sacrifices made by our Armed Forces.

Each year, Operation Second Chance provides over 150 families (over 400 individuals) with personal, financial, emotional, logistical and physical support they need to overcome their current crisis and prepare for their future as a family.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Operation Giving Back

An internship program for wounded, injured, or ill Veterans and their family members. This internship provides a living stipend and an opportunity to give back.

Category

Internships

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

Budget

$128,000.00

Program 2

Morale, Welfare and Recreation

When our veterans come home wounded, ill or injured from a combat zone, some of them have obvious medical problems, such as severe burns, or an amputation. Others have “hidden” problems, such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or Traumatic Brain Injuries. Either way, these brave men and women face considerable challenges when they begin the process of reuniting with their families and assimilating to civilian life. OSC offers a variety of morale activities for our injured soldiers and their families, for the purpose of bonding as a family, assimilating to civilian life and preparing for the challenges they will continue to face long after they
have left the hospital. Our retreats and day trips include quiet, private settings as well as group outings to local sporting events, restaurants, shows, and other recreational activities. We offer spa days for spouses and caregivers and family-oriented fun days to include children.

Category

Services for Specific Populations

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

Budget

$300,000.00

Program 3

Essential Daily Assistance

The purpose of OSC’s Essential Daily Assistance program is to meet the ever-increasing needs of the wounded warriors’ families experiencing the trauma of medical crisis and the resulting financial hardship. These wounded Veterans are no longer receiving active duty pay, but have not yet begun to receive veterans retirement benefits. This lag time, often six months or longer, coupled with the fact that the soldier's spouse must often take a leave of absence from his or her employment, means the family has little or no income to sustain themselves. Essential Daily Assistance aims to provide support where it is needed most, to help our families through this financial crisis.

Category

Emergency Assistance

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

Budget

$225,000.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    We are patriotic citizens committed to serving our wounded, injured and ill combat veterans. We support Veterans and their families while they recover in military hospitals, by building relationships and identifying and supporting immediate needs and interests. We are dedicated to promoting public awareness of the many sacrifices made by our Armed Forces.

    Operation Second Chance serves soldiers and marines receiving or recently completing long-term rehabilitative care at one of the larger national military hospitals, such as Walter Reed National Medical Military Center in Bethesda, MD. Our programs are designed for the benefit of the entire family.

    We contribute to lasting, meaningful change by providing a spectrum of support for our families that addresses immediate needs and prepares them for their future. 1) Our financial assistance helps them with their current household crisis. 2) Our retreats help to heal our soldiers’ inner wounds and realign their lives to new horizons. 3) Our local activities reconnect service members with their families and build community with other families in similar situations. 4) Our mentoring and internship programs prepare injured service members for the challenges they will continue to face in the years to come.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Our strategic program portfolio includes a spectrum of activities designed to provide holistic solutions for wounded service members in crisis and their families:
    • The Essential Daily Assistance and Airfare Program—direct financial assistance and travel funding for special situations
    • No Person Left Behind—fully accessible sport outings for disabled combat veterans
    • Operation Giving Back—internships for soldiers and their spouses re-entering the workforce or retraining for new careers
    • Retreats and Day Trips—opportunities for families to re-bond after deployment
    • Hospital Visitations—for staff and volunteers to meet with wounded, ill or injured service members and provide them with encouragement and support
    Through a combination of these services, each family is provided with an immediate and supportive community, guidance through the changes they are experiencing, and a plan for the future.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Operation Second Chance serves soldiers from all over the U.S. and has established regional operations in a dozen communities. OSC has an annual budget of just under $900,000 and a staff of 3 full-time employees.

    OSC draws on the expertise and resources of over 90 committed volunteers and receives over $200,000 of in-kind services annually. Our volunteers serve as mentors, retreat organizers, outing escorts, hospital visitors, legal advocates, administrative assistants, fundraisers and others. We collaborate with dozens of community partners to serve our families. Every year we continue to add to our growing roster of caring individuals, corporations, service clubs, churches, social agencies and others who lend service to our programs and provide financial or other program support.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Operation Second Chance tracks the participation of our families on a large scale as well as a very personal one. We aggregate our program data to determine how many individuals and families receive services each year (approximately 400-500), and the dollar value of those services. However, Operation Second Chance is not focused merely on “keeping up our numbers.” It is vitally important to us that the soldiers and their families who go on our retreats or outings, who receive assistance or who speak with our hospital visitors are touched in a positive and life-changing way. We are there to make a significant impact in the lives of each and every one of our soldiers and their families. We solicit feedback at every activity and draw upon our families’ experiences to refine our programs.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Operation Second Chance recently completed a strategic planning session to set us on our path to success in the next five years. We are excited about the growth potential of OSC, yet we have made a strategic decision to maintain the in-depth and personal quality of our services. We have recently expanded our retreat program to include 6 locations, and we have begun replicating our hospital visitation program, first implemented at Walter Reed, at other larger military hospitals in Texas, Tampa and are currently working to establish a relationship in California. Our national board has stepped up to formalize and refine our internal financial processes and program quality controls to facilitate our growth, and each year our fundraising exceeds the year before. We have expanded our staff to reflect our growth and expected increase in demand for near-term and long-term services. Our commitment to our nation’s wounded veterans will continue after the war’s end. We are preparing now to extend our outreach to soldiers and their families over the long-term and adapt our services to the changing needs of our communities. We will never forget our nation’s military heroes.
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

Our veterans literally put their lives on the line to protect our freedoms. Some of them come back with terrible wounds and struggle to make ends meet on a day-to-day basis. At Operation Second Chance, we give our wounded veterans the financial and emotional support they need to pay their rent, fix their cars, or even feed their families. OSC has provided assistance to veterans in nearly every state in the nation and Puerto Rico.

Social Media

Blog

Videos

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Operation Second Chance Inc
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

Sign In or Create Account to view Revenue and Expenses information

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

OPERATION SECOND CHANCE INC

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

President and Founder

Cindy McGrew

BIO

Cindy worked full time for 17 1/2 years for Smith Barney, formerly Legg Mason. She left her full time job to concentrate her efforts more fully to the organization. Cindy enjoys riding her Harley every chance she gets. Cindy began this mission of hope out of love for our country, pride in being an American and a huge respect for those serving in the military.

I learned Patriotism and a love for Country at a very young age. I have four older brothers that served in various branches of the military. Three of my brothers went off to war (Paul, Bruce, Kenneth). My brother Ted, went to West Point. My oldest brother was injured while serving his country. I remember how my brothers were treated when they returned home from Vietnam, and I vowed to do all I could to see that future heroes were not treated that way again. As a teenager I wore a special POW/MIA bracelet as a constant reminder we still had soldiers missing... to this day, they are not forgotten.

Saying the Pledge of Allegiance everyday in school as a child taught me to be proud of my country. I still get chills when I say the Pledge of Allegiance or hear our National Anthem. I am so proud of all of our young men and women that answer the call to duty. God Bless you one and all.

Cindy's admiration and respect for all individuals involved in the military sparked her visits to Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) in Washington, D.C. Cindy continues her daily visits with the soldiers she met in the hospital, even as they transition to the Mologne House and Fisher House. There has hardly been a day since September of 2004 that she has missed going to WRAMC to visit with her new friends.

STATEMENT FROM THE President and Founder

"Our Founder's Story

In September 2004, Cindy McGrew began a mission of hope. When her friend, Montgomery County, MD Police
Officer Sgt. Mike Russo went to Iraq as an International Police Advisor in June of 2004, Cindy began reading
online daily for updates to ongoing situations. She heard about three soldiers that were injured and en route to
Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) in Washington DC. Immediately, Cindy sent emails to the families,
letting them know she lived fairly close to WRAMC, offering her support and assistance as a contact in the area
in the event they needed anything.

Cindy began visiting families at the request of other soldiers and Marines she had met. Soon, word spread and
she seemed to be branching out to even more families, wanting to help in any way possible.
In November 2004, Debbie and Alaina Sacramo joined Cindy in her daily visits to the hospital. All three were
able to visit with the soldiers, Marines and their family members, picking up groceries, clothing and any other
essential items that were needed to make their stay more comfortable. They met families with small children
and saw the need for them to have playpens in their rooms, so the parents could put their children down and
tend to their wounded spouses. This also allowed for the children to nap in comfort. At the request of some of
the soldiers, they stopped at local restaurants, bringing them milkshakes and meals.

Friendships began to develop with the soldiers, Marines and their family members, making the trip to WRAMC
part of their daily routine.

In March 2005 it became apparent that this simple mission could become something much larger than any of
the individuals involved imagined. Ride Allegheny offered a fundraiser for the wounded soldiers and Marines,
Freedom Ride 205, thus creating the need for a non-profit organization. The foundation for Operation Second
Chance, Inc. was thus established in March 2005."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ms. Cindy McGrew

Operation Second Chance

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Race & Ethnicity
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members and Full-Time Staff.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members and Full-Time Staff.

Diversity Strategies
No
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity