Human Services

HAVEN FOR HOPE OF BEXAR COUNTY

  • San Antonio, TX
  • www.havenforhope.org

Mission Statement

The establishment of the Haven for Hope campus was a direct response to an unmet and serious community need. In 2006, business and civic leader Bill Greehey began to recognize the serious growing problem of homelessness in Bexar County. With the support of City leaders, Mr. Greehey then began the effort to create Haven for Hope as an independent 501 (c) 3 nonprofit organization. The Haven for Hope “one stop" design was born after 18 months of research of over 200 homeless shelters across the country. Today, Haven for Hope works together with over 90 Partner agencies; over 35 of those agencies provide over 150 comprehensive services directly on the campus to address barriers to self-sufficiency such as medical care (primary, dental, vision), food, legal services, mental health, substance abuse, child care, spiritual needs and much more.

Haven for Hope serves men, women and children experiencing homelessness. The Transformational Campus is open to men, women and families that are actively working towards goals of permanent housing. On any given day, there are 877 residents living on the Transformational Campus. This includes 401 single men, 165 single women, 247 family members (158 children with an average age of 6) and 64 veterans. The Haven for Hope Courtyard is available to people experiencing homelessness that are not immediately physically or emotionally ready to begin working on goals towards housing. Traumatic experiences, other mental health issues and substance abuse and dependency are some of the issues that might keep an individual from making any program commitments. However, The Courtyard is an open door to medical care, therapy, detoxification and the complete system of care. The Courtyard has a psychiatrist and medical doctor, psychiatric and registered nurses, a complete staff of compassionate, understanding people ready to offer their expertise. Guests at The Courtyard also have access to food, safe sleeping, shower facilities and more. The Courtyard serves approximately 600 individuals overnight and over 770 individuals during the day. In addition, Haven for Hope serves approximately 300 individuals and families who have recently transitioned from living at Haven for Hope into permanent housing by providing assistance in their homes. This support is provided for up to one year to help address any issues that may occur that could cause returns to homelessness.

Main Programs

  1. Assistance to People Experiencing Homelessness
Service Areas

Self-reported

Texas

Haven for Hope serves people experiencing homelessness in San Antonio/Bexar County, Texas.

ruling year

2007

President and CEO since 2016

Self-reported

Kenneth L Wilson

Keywords

Self-reported

homeless, job training, education, behavioral health care, shelter, mental heath

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Also Known As

Haven for Hope of Bexar County

EIN

20-8075412

 Number

4689378756

Physical Address

1 Haven for Hope Way

San Antonio, TX 78207

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

We are in the business of engaging people experiencing homelessness who are working to transform their lives. We conduct our work with over 80 community partner agencies that provide a network of care that starts on our campus and moves into the community. Our focus is to address the root causes of homelessness and meet people where they are.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Assistance to People Experiencing Homelessness

Haven for Hope works together with over 90 Partner agencies; over 35 of those agencies provide services directly on the campus to address some of the common causes of homelessness in San Antonio, including lack of affordable housing, unemployment, underemployment, mental illness and substance abuse. Haven for Hope serves men, women and children experiencing homelessness. The Transformational Campus is open to men, women and families that are actively working towards goals of permanent housing. On any given day, there are 877 residents living on the Transformational Campus. This includes 401 single men, 165 single women, 247 family members (158 children with an average age of 6) and 64 veterans. The Haven for Hope Courtyard is available to people experiencing homelessness that are not immediately physically or emotionally ready to begin working on goals towards housing. Traumatic experiences, other mental health issues and substance abuse and dependency are some of the issues that might keep an individual from making any program commitments. However, The Courtyard is an open door to medical care, therapy, detoxification and the complete system of care. The Courtyard has a psychiatrist and medical doctor, psychiatric and registered nurses, a complete staff of compassionate, understanding people ready to offer their expertise. Guests at The Courtyard also have access to food, safe sleeping, shower facilities and more. The Courtyard serves approximately 600 individuals overnight and over 770 individuals during the day. In addition, Haven for Hope serves approximately 300 individuals and families who have recently transitioned from living at Haven for Hope into permanent housing by providing assistance in their homes. This support is provided for up to one year to help address any issues that may occur that could cause returns to homelessness.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Homeless

None

Budget

18,625,000

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    To help individuals experiencing homelessness to find income and housing through comprehensive transformational services.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    FIVE TENETS OF MEMBER ENGAGEMENT WITH HAVEN FOR HOPE

    STRIVING FOR RECOVERY AND HEALING
    Health and wellness (mental, physical, spiritual) are center and forefront for people at Haven for Hope who are striving to reach their full potential and live a self-directed life. Every person engaged in services with Haven for Hope has the strength to heal from the past and overcome the obstacles keeping them from a full, healthy life in the community.

    PURSUING SUSTAINABLE INCOME
    Sustainable income is essential in supporting permanent housing and all the household expenses a Graduate will incur when they leave Haven for Hope. For some, their income pursuit will be employment. For others, the primary income source will be social security. Some may receive income from both social security and part-time employment.

    ENGAGED IN A HOME PLAN
    Taking steps toward permanent housing is key difference in expectation between Haven for Hope and traditional shelter services. Haven's focus is on both meeting basic emergency needs and guiding Members toward through a plan toward stable and sustainable housing. Some examples of housing include market rate apartments, subsidized apartments, permanent supportive housing, group/multi-person housing, family re-integration, home ownership and permanent residential care. Members are expected to engage in the following:
     Readiness or clear interest in taking steps toward housing, and,
     Active engagement with the H4H Housing Team toward sustainable permanent housing.

    IMPROVING FINANCIAL LITERACY
    Financial literacy is the ability to make smart and informed decisions regarding money, a skill that is essential to maintain a home and create a plan to pay household expenses. Every Member is expected to engage in literacy lessons as a critical skill needed to break the cycle of poverty. At Haven for Hope, focus on these skills includes:
     Addressing the values that play a key role in making financial decisions
     Understanding how to differentiate between needs and wants
     Looking at issues that are unique to low-income households (i.e. impact of opening a savings account on public assistance)
     Applying learned skills to their own household budgets in classroom time
     Working to improve money management, household budgeting, saving money, paying off debt and credit scores

    BUILDING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES
    Community provides the needed relationships and resources (social capital) that sustain an independent and interdependent future. Every Member is expected to engage in service offerings that will build a healthy community at Haven and also in their new home and neighborhood. At Haven for Hope, these are the modalities utilized with and among those served at Haven to prepare for (re)integration within the San Antonio Community at-large:
     Shared Living Responsibilities
     Independent Living/Life Skills
     Faith Home Connections
     Volunteer Opportunities
     Relationships and Resources
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    It would be nearly impossible as well as inefficient for one organization to provide all of the direct services that are needed by individuals and families experiencing homelessness to achieve long-term self-sufficiency. With a common goal in mind, Haven for Hope and our Partner organizations provide a comprehensive constellation of services to meet the needs of our residents.

    In addition, Haven for Hope provides numerous critical support services that allow Partner agencies to focus their time and funding efforts on their own core competencies and align direct services. Although the physical co-location of partners on a single campus is critical to the success of Haven for Hope, it takes much more than merely being in the same location for the whole continuum of services to collaboratively maximize their resources. The following Supportive Services represent the glue factors that drive successful collaboration and efficient service delivery at Haven for Hope: Partner Relations and Support, Quality Assurance and Data Collection, Technological Services, Facility Maintenance and 24/7 Life Safety operations.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Haven for Hope serves as the City of San Antonio's centralized Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) provider and provides support to the San Antonio continuum. HMIS is a highly configurable database designed to track every Member, program and service on the Haven for Hope Campus. HMIS is utilized by all Partner agencies with real time data sharing, providing true interagency collaboration and communication. HMIS was designed to administer multiple organization databases and also allows our Partners to better track a Member's/ Prospect's/ Community Member's progress. Haven for Hope outcomes and metrics are closely reviewed on a monthly basis at multiple staff levels in order to address, evaluate and respond to any spikes or declines in services.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Haven for Hope is evolving as a learning organization which allows us to create structural and programmatic changes based on outcome information from various sources. Over time, Haven for Hope programs have evolved into a hybrid of best practices.

    The initial service delivery on campus was based off of behavioral-based “best practices" in which services were delivered in a “one size fits all" approach. What we immediately learned was that this model of delivering services fostered positive changes for some but not all. The urgency of this problem called for the creation of a task force consisting of Haven for Hope staff and Partner staff. These meetings spearheaded multiple structural changes at Haven for Hope including a system for providing specialized services to different subsets of the homeless population, including veterans, seniors, those who have one or multiple disabilities and families.

    Although graduation rates and overall program success rates drastically increased after this change, Haven for Hope began to discover other practices that could increase program success even more. This discovery occurred by analyzing the success of one of our most successful programs on the campus, our In-House Recovery Program (IHRP), managed by the Center for Health Care Services. IHRP, which launched in October of 2010, is a substance abuse program with a strong foundation of peer support. Haven for Hope immediately began to notice rapid success with the program; where we had envisioned participants completing IHRP prior to joining campus, many completed the program and went straight into the job market bypassing Haven for Hope services completely. This realization led to further analysis of how services in the entire continuum were provided and spearheaded system-wide changes.

    Haven for Hope is now focusing efforts on applying evidence-based practices to our programs. After extensive research and consultations with experts in the field of recovery (Yale University, National Center on Family Homelessness, Via Hope, Center for Social Innovation, etc.), Haven for Hope began to integrate a recovery model to all program services on campus. The recovery model has been used historically for treating symptoms of mental health and addictions, but the significant correlation between recovery, trauma, mental health, addictions and homelessness provides Haven for Hope the opportunity to become a national pioneer for applying recovery-oriented systems of care to homelessness. These practices include integrating trauma-informed care and person/family-centered planning into our services on campus.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Texas

Haven for Hope serves people experiencing homelessness in San Antonio/Bexar County, Texas.

Social Media

Funding Needs

Funding is needed for on-going Operations of the Campus. Operations refer to expenses of the educational and job training programs, case management, security, facilities and adminstration.

Videos

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Haven for Hope of Bexar County
Fiscal year: Oct 01-Sep 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

HAVEN FOR HOPE OF BEXAR COUNTY

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
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  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2015 and 2014
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
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President and CEO

Kenneth L Wilson

BIO

Kenny Wilson joined Haven for Hope as president and CEO in April 2016 after being unanimously selected by our Board of Directors. He leads Haven for Hope's 200-plus employee workforce in our mission to save and transform the lives of persons who are experiencing homelessness.

Prior to Haven for Hope, Wilson served as Market President for Bank of America in San Antonio, a position he has held since 2000. He also served U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, as Managing Director and Market Executive, overseeing the investment management, credit, trust, and banking services for high net worth individuals and families in San Antonio, Austin, and Midland.

Throughout his career Wilson has been highly active in the San Antonio community, currently or previously serving in such leadership roles as chairman of the Greater San Antonio Chamber of Commerce, chairman of the University of Texas at San Antonio development board, chairman of the San Antonio Economic Development Foundation, chairman of the San Antonio Symphony, and board chair for the Free Trade Alliance. He is currently a board member of the San Antonio Museum of Art, the P16 Education Council and is a former member of the executive committee of The United Way of San Antonio and Bexar County. He has served as chairman of the Endowment Committee for the Christus Santa Rosa Children's Hospital Foundation, for which he was awarded a lifetime membership to the Board, and was founding president of the Luminaria arts festival. Wilson has received numerous awards and recognitions for his public service, including the 2015 City Year Award and the 2015 Briscoe Friends of Youth Award.

Wilson is a native of Fort Worth. He earned a bachelor's degree from Abilene Christian University and completed post-graduate work in finance and accounting. His wife, Sharon, is the former Children's/Student Minister at Oak Hills Church in San Antonio. Two of their daughters are teachers, and their youngest daughter founded and operates a non-profit organization in El Salvador. The Wilsons have three grandchildren.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Bill Greehey

Chairman of NuStar Energy L.P. and NuStar GP Holdings, LLC

Term: Nov 2006 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?