Youth Development

College Access Plan

  • Pasadena, CA
  • www.collegeaccessplan.org

Mission Statement

College Access Plan prepares underserved students to succeed in college.

At CAP, our goal is to ensure that all students have equal access to college preparation and success, each student is regarded as a unique, complete individual, and college is an affordable option for every student.

Main Programs

  1. Campus Support at Pasadena High Schools
  2. Campus Support at Pasadena Middle Schools
  3. Community Workshops
  4. I Heart College
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Pasadena and Altadena

ruling year

2007

Executive Director since 2006

Self-reported

Monique Hyman

Keywords

Self-reported

college access readiness pasadena high school john muir blair high school washington middle school

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EIN

20-8371402

Physical Address

871 E Washington Blvd Ste. 207

Pasadena, CA 91104

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

We offer accessible, high quality college readiness support through one-to-one advisement and workshops that meet students' individual needs. We bridge the college support gap through locally-responsive, educator-designed curriculum. While some students rise to the top of their class, most have below a 3.0 GPA and are excluded from other available college readiness programs. CAP serves a full third of the district's graduating seniors, and our recent evaluation of PUSD's class of 2015 illustrated that students with a 2.0-3.0 GPA were two-and-a-half times more likely to attend a four-year college if they attended CAP, and students with above a 3.0 GPA were more than twice as likely to right-match with a more competitive UC over under-matching and attending a CSU campus.

This provides strong evidence of CAP's efficacy in improving college-going rates and college choices in PUSD. At 43% male, CAP's served population is more gender-balanced than populations typically served by college access and success programs.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Campus Support at Pasadena High Schools

CAP partners with Pasadena’s John Muir, Blair, Marshall, and Pasadena high schools and Pasadena LEARNs after school program to provide college readiness workshops and one-to-one college advisement after school to all students on a drop-in basis. Because students do not need to enroll in our programs permanently, they are free to access the help they need, when they need it. We work closely with instructors and counselors to ensure our programs fit curriculum needs.

Additionally, CAP provides individualized counseling supports to students attending three alternative high schools.

Lastly, CAP provides general college readiness and awareness presentations and informative planning portfolios in classrooms in partnership with teachers and counselors.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Young Adults (20-25 years)

None

Budget

Program 2

Campus Support at Pasadena Middle Schools

CAP provides interactive and fun in-class and after school college, academic, and career readiness classes to students at Washington Middle School.

Category

Youth Development, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Program 3

Community Workshops

Through meaningful partnerships and collaboration, CAP provides periodic workshops to youth-serving organizations in our community. In the past, topics have included: Financial Aid and FAFSA preparation, General College Readiness Presentations, and Personal Statement Writing.

Category

Population(s) Served

None

Budget

Program 4

I Heart College

IHC supports selected CAP program alumni (up to 100 per graduation class) through college success.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Young Adults (20-25 years)

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Number of clients participating in educational programs

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years)

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

2. Percent of students who persist in college

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years), Adults

Connected to a Program?
I Heart College
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Goal I: Increase college-going rate in PUSD by 10% in five years
    Goal 2: Create college graduation pipeline beginning in 6th grade that builds early college-focused habits
    Goal 3: Support 75% six-year college graduation rate for all consistently-attending CAP alumni
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    -Provide middle and high school students with holistic support focused on self-advocacy, effective communication, technical writing strategies, study skills, and more
    -Provide drop-in support for all students regardless of postsecondary aspirations, grades, and ability to attend
    -Provide responsive workshops open to all students at all high schools with focus on financial aid, SAT/ACT preparation, application filing, goal-setting, and career/college searching
    -Track and follow up with students to identify necessary areas for intervention
    -Provide students and parents with resources to help make effective decisions about colleges and careers
    -Build online, in-person, and peer-to-peer mechanisms that support alumni
    -Build relationships and attendance rates with colleges and programs that provide additional support to students while they are in college
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    CAP not only has a close and collaborative relationship with the school district and other local organizations; we have the trained and specifically skilled staff members to make it happen. CAP's programs, at under $300 per student, are sustainable as well as impactful.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    -Increase in number of participants and frequency of visits; measured against previous years' attendance
    -Higher number of qualified CAP students attend 4-year colleges than in the general PUSD population
    -Higher number of non-eligible CAP students attend college than in the general population
    -Graduation & transfer rates exceed average due to I Heart College Program
    -Measure effectiveness of CAP SAT/ACT prep courses; determine ability to increase scores by 10%
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    -Increased attendance year over year
    -more A-G eligible CAP students attend 4-year college than in general PUSD population
    -more A-G ineligible CAP students attend any college than in the general PUSD population
    -Classes of 2013-2015 currently have 93% retention rate (as of April 2016)
Service Areas

Self-reported

California

Pasadena and Altadena

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

CAP's top financial driver is always salaries because our work depends most on trained, effective, and exceptional staff who can build relationships with students and foster pivotal moments that galvanize student self-efficacy. Because we partner with PUSD and other local organizations, our overhead remains low and we can serve on a large number of students on a lean budget that prioritizes impact and outcomes.

Videos

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

COLLEGE ACCESS PLAN
Fiscal year: Aug 01-Jul 31

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

College Access Plan

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2015 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Executive Director

Monique Hyman

BIO

As one of CAP's founders, Mo can't think of anywhere else on earth she'd rather be. The students she meets every day inspire her to work hard and laugh a lot. It's easy for her to be passionate about college: it was as an undergraduate at Michigan State University receiving a BA in English that Mo developed into a scholar, became a community advocate, and made the friends of a lifetime. She has since gone on to obtain an MA in English from the University of New Mexico and an Masters of Public Administration from USC. Eight summers leading adventure trips for high schoolers at a camp based in Michigan fueled her love of nontraditional education; over a decade in the classroom as a community college professor at Pierce College and Pasadena City College in the Los Angeles area built her passion for educational equality and access. CAP allows her to combine these passions and work shoulder-to-shoulder with the most amazing students, staff, board, and community she could have ever imagined.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

LaWayne Williams

Tournament of Roses

Term: Aug 2016 - July 2018

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.
Race & Ethnicity
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Diversity Strategies
No
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity