The Family Pantry of Cape Cod (Family Pantry of Cape Cod Corp The)

We err on the side of generousity

aka Second Glance Thrift Shop   |   Harwich, MA   |  thefamilypantry.com

Mission

The Family Pantry of Cape Cod’s mission is to provide food and clothing to All who need it.

Ruling year info

1995

Executive Director

Ms Christine Harmon Menard

Main address

133 Queen Anne Road

Harwich, MA 02645 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-3079904

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Family Pantry of Cape Cod is committed to providing food equity across Cape Cod.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Program

The Family Pantry food program provides food to over 8800 clients annually. We distribute over 93,000 bags of food valued at over $3.9 million dollars. The Family Pantry has moved from an emergency pantry helping those who might have lost a job or had an illness to a "sustaining pantry". We keep families in their homes and on Cape during the winter months when employment opportunities are greatly reduced. 65% of our families have one if not two working adults in the household. In addition to providing food and clothing for the Family Pantry Clients, the Pantry acts as a cross dock facility for the Greater Boston Food Bank. The Food Bank delivers 2 tractor trailers of product to the Pantry every Monday. The local, smaller pantries come to our warehouse to pick up their load delivered by the Greater Boston Food Bank, saving them a long and expensive trip to Boston. This partnership furthers our mission of providing food for those in need across the Cape and the Islands.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Family Pantry Garden is 9000 square feet and affectionately referred to as "the beast". She is tough but generous, in 2021 she produced over 6500 pounds of produce for the Family Pantry. So much product that we were able to share with the other Pantries on Cape who pick up their loads at our warehouse.. Volunteers work on M/W/F so the produce is in the Pantry and ready for distribution on T/Th/Sat. The garden saved the Pantry roughly $26,000 in produce food costs in 2021

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

The Healthy Meals in Motion mobile pantry was launched in September 2016. The business plan for the mobile pantry was built and paid for by an "intellectual grant" from Blue Cross. A committee from Blue Cross and the Family Pantry spent nearly a year researching mobile pantries across Massachusetts to determine best practices and more importantly what to avoid when launching a mobile operation. The Mobile Pantry focuses on the senior populations on the lower Cape, including Dennis, Chatham, Harwich, Brewster, Orleans and Provincetown. These towns were identified by Feeding America's "map the meals" survey as not having the capacity to provide their citizens at least two meals per day. The Cape has very little mass transportation and struggles with year round employment. The mobile pantry makes it easy for seniors to access healthy foods without having to drive a great distance.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Seniors

The Family Pantry distributes donated clothing each time food is distributed. Clients who cannot afford their food cannot afford clothing. A client is allowed to shop in the Pantry Boutique each time they come to the Pantry. The Pantry distributes clothing to men, women and children along with books, limited health and beauty care items, linens, soft goods and small home goods.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Children and youth

Foods to Encourage is a weekly program where a nutrition educator, and two county nurses are scheduled at The Pantry to take the blood pressure and blood sugar of people who concerns about high blood pressure, heart disease and or diabetes. The information is logged weekly and the results are reviewed with the client. The nutrition educator provides a recipe and the "fixings" for a healthy meal the clients can cook at home. The goal is track the results and help the clients improve their overall health through better nutrition.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Through a partnership with Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen's Alliance we provide locally caught flash frozen fish to our clients 5 times a year. This serves three purposes:
1. provides a nutritionally superior source of protein to people who otherwise could not afford it.
2. provides further employment to fishermen who sometimes become clients in the off-season.
3. promotes lesser known but equally tasty and nutritious species of fish which helps to sustain the fishing industry

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator

Awards

Service Enterprise Accreditation 2017

1000 Points of Light

Citizens Bank Champion in Action 2011

Citizens Bank

Community Partner Award 2012

Greater Boston Food Bank

Grant and Helene Wilson Outstanding NonProfit of the Year 2017

Cape and Islands United Way

DCU Fox News Home Town Hero 2013

Fox News

Organization of the Year 2014

Harwich Chamber of Commerce

Kip Tiernan Founders Award 1992

Greater Boston Food Bank

Grant and Helene Wilson Excellence in Non Profit 2019

United Way

Affiliations & memberships

Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

Cape Cod Hunger Network 2020

Lower Cape Leadership Forum 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Food Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Pounds of Food Distributed Annually

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth

Related Program

Food Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total weight of materials recycled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Clothing Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We recycle any clothing that is not acceptable for use in our client boutique or our Second Glance Thrift Shop.

Pounds of produce distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Food Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Family Pantry strives to provide at least 33% of all distributed foods to be fresh produce.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Family Pantry of Cape Cod has the vision to eliminate hunger on Cape Cod, supported by the mission of providing food and clothing to those in need regardless of who you are or where you live. The Cape is know as an affluent seasonal community. However, as in many seasonal community the year round workforce often struggles to make ends meet during the off season. The Pantry is no longer an "emergency pantry" helping to offset a job loss or significant injury. The Pantry is now a "sustaining" pantry, one that allows the seasonal worker to remain on Cape during the off season. Over 60% of our clients have one if not two working members in the household. We estimate that approximately 25% of our clients leave us due to better circumstances, better jobs or relocation. However, in 2018 we have seen an 11% increase in new clients, predominately in the service industry. The Family Pantry makes it possible for these people to afford to live on the Cape, and raise their families in a safe and welcoming community. The service industry labor force is critical to the economical welfare of the Cape community.

The Family Pantry is the only pantry of the Cape to serve the entire Cape and without restrictions. We base our food distributions on the Federal Poverty Guidelines when determining how much food a family can receive. However, no family or individual leaves the Pantry without food. We are a choice pantry meaning that clients select the foods they would like to receive, ensuring the food is consumed and not wasted. The Pantry is known for providing a vast selection of foods including dry goods, meat, produce, dairy, seafood, & bread. The Pantry is proud to provide at least 33% of all foods distributed as fresh produce. The Pantry also supports the Foods To Encourage program where the community is encouraged to come to the Pantry weekly to sit with a registered dietician and nurse to monitor blood pressure, diabetes and heart issues. The Healthy Meals on Motion mobile pantry is a means to serve clients on the lower cape who carry the additional burden of limited year round employment and transportation. Lastly, but certainly not least is our own Family Pantry garden, each year the garden produces over 3 tons of produce that is freely distributed to clients without restrictions.

The Family Pantry has a strong sustainability plan. The Pantry owns the Second Glance Thrift Boutique which is known as "the Nordstrom's" of thrift on Cape Cod. Sales at Second Glance now cover almost 33% of the operating expense of the Pantry. In addition, the bottles and can recycling revenue stream provides another 3% to the food program and the textile recycling stream contributes almost 2% to the food program. The Family Pantry is a member of the Cape Cod Hunger Network and is on the advisory council of the Greater Boston Food Bank. The Pantry also partners with the Cape Cod Fishermen's Alliance encouraging the Fishermen to provide species that are not as well known, such as skate, mackerel and scup for consumption at the Pantry. This partnership keeps the fishermen fishing, provides a valuable protein source for the clients and introduces lesser known species to the Cape community. The Family Pantry operates a satellite food pantry on the Cape Cod Community College Campus in Hyannis to help lessen the food insecurity of College students, staff and faculty. Over 200 families access the campus pantry and are able to choose a full bag of non-perishable groceries each week. It is difficult to concentrate when a person is consumed with where their next meal will come from. This small pantry is working to break the cycle of poverty, providing food to students, so they can concentrate on earning their degree.

The Family Pantry mission is very simple: provide food and clothing for those in need. The focus remains firmly on these two areas. There are many organizations across the Cape that meet other demands of the community. Having enough to eat is fundamental to well being, the Pantry ensures that children, individuals and families have food to eat and clothes to wear. Last June we increased the food and clothing distributions to every 14 days, eliminating much of the stress felt as a home pantry empties.

In 2021 the Pantry continued to face the Pandemic head on and was able to continue providing a "choice" pantry for our families. We feel it is critical that our families are able to choose the foods they want to offer their families. We were able to do this by moving to a curbside operation and leveraging the shopping list that is used in our Mobile Food Pantry operation. The Pantry served over 9,500people in 2021 and distributed over 93,000 bags of food. The Pantry has re-engaged the "reimagine committee" concept to move us forward post Covid-19 incorporating all of the efficiencies learned during the Pandemic. We continue to distribute over 33% of fresh produce and we are pleased that our clients can shop with us every 14 days.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The Family Pantry redesigned the entire food distribution area to accommodate natural light. We built a new entrance and re-engineered the flow of the Pantry We are currently surveying clients and volunteers to determine best practices post Covid-19

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

The Family Pantry of Cape Cod (Family Pantry of Cape Cod Corp The)
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Family Pantry of Cape Cod (Family Pantry of Cape Cod Corp The)

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Matt Kelley

Matt Kelley, Esq

Term: 2016 - 2022

Matt Kelley

Lawyer

Nancy Poor

Retired

Toni London

Monomoy School District

Larry Lyford

Thirwood Place

John DeVito

Cape Cod Five Cents Savings Bank

Craig Morong

Self Employed

Richard Roy

Rick Roy Construction

Melissa Massi

Para Legal

CESAR ALCANATRA

Manager

CONNOR FRANCIS

student

Mary Kate Gallagher

Banker

Kathy McNamar

Cape Cod Community College

Patricia Nadle

Health Care

Matt Pitta

Health Care

Justin Tavano

Emergency Services

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/23/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.